Backstage Backstage #2

Gettin' Plexy wit it

Adam, Jerod, and Tim get together to talk about Plex! Plex is a media server which allows you to store your movies, TV shows, music, photos, etc. Turns out, you can actually use it together with an antenna to watch live TV and DVR content. They chat about what has Adam so excited, the pros and cons (or as Adam said, "trade-offs"), and how to get started.

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JS Party JS Party #47

The nitty gritty on BitMidi

Where does Feross get all those wonderful toys? He builds them with JavaScript, of course! BitMidi – a website for listening to your favorite MIDI files – is his latest creation. In this episode, Jerod “sits down” with Feross to learn all about it. How do MIDIs even work? Why won’t they play on the web anymore? Can WASM save the day (hint: yes)? How does Feross get so many eyeballs on his creations? Is Preact awesome for building sites like this? What’s the future of BitMidi look like? Don’t ask us, listen to the episode!

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DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

What serverless platform are developers primarily using?

DigitalOcean surveyed nearly 5,000 developers from around the world about their opinions on software development, the tools they use, and the challenges they face. When asked about serverless platforms, this is what they had to say. AWS Lamda - 58% Google Cloud Functions - 23% Microsoft Azure Functions - 10% Apache / IBM OpenWhisk - 2% OpenFaaS - 2% Iron.io - 1% Other - 4% Get answers to more questions like this about developer trends in the cloud from our friends at DigitalOcean in their quarterly report called Currents.

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kate Matsudaira ACM

How to get things done when you don't feel like it

Kate Matsudaira provides 5 excellent strategies for pushing through: Even if you love your job, you don't always feel like doing it every day. There are so many factors that influence your ability to show up to work with enthusiasm and then work hard all day long. From gamification to calendaring, Kate has a lot of good advice in this piece. I even learned a new word, "precrastination", which I've been doing a lot of without even knowing it! 💪

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CSS webflow.com

CSS Grid sorcery! (build CSS Grid layouts visually with Webflow)

This must be of the dark arts. Never before has this level of visual UI and control been given to the masses, carte blanche — wow, truly impressed. From Vlad Magdalin (Webflow co-founder and CEO) on Twitter: CSS Grid in @webflow is one of those features that makes me fall in love with our mission all over again. The power and flexibility this places in designers' hands is mind-blowing, and it the amount of creativity this can unleash is super inspiring! 😍https://t.co/mPlezTPgZv pic.twitter.com/INe3N0LEqI— Vlad Magdalin (@callmevlad) October 10, 2018 The video attached to this tweet has been viewed 23,000 times (so far)!

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Vue.js github.com

A renderless (?) and extendable rich text editor for Vue.js

Hot on the heels of Rails' announced rich text editor comes tiptap for Vue, which is built with Prosemirror. But what does "renderless" even mean? With renderless components you'll have (almost) full control over markup and styling. I don't want to tell you what a menu should look like or where it should be rendered in the DOM. That's all up to you. There is also a good article about renderless components by Adam Wathan. That's a great idea as long as you provide some default/swappable rendering for folks who just want to get started quickly. Full demo of tiptap in action right here.

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Away from Keyboard Away from Keyboard #8

Eryn O'Neil isn't afraid to speak her mind

Eryn O'Neil grew up in the southwestern suburbs of Chicago. When it came time for college, it was easy for her to move a few states over and go to college in a small town in Iowa. She now lives in Minneapolis, and after years of being self-employed, she just finished a months-long journey to find her next job. Eryn talks to me about being the first female engineering manager at her new company, what excites her about technology, the hurdles of married life, and staying healthy in a demanding industry.

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The Changelog The Changelog #318

A call for kindness in open source

Adam and Jerod talk to Brett Cannon, core contributor to Python and a fantastic representative of the Python community. They talked through various details surrounding a talk and blog post he wrote titled "Setting expectations for open source participation" and covered questions like: What is the the purpose of open source? How do you sustain open source? And what's the goal? They even talked through typical scenarios in open source and how kindness and recognizing that there's a human on the other end of every action can really go a long way.

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 Itamar Turner-Trauring codewithoutrules.com

Stabbing yourself with a fork() in a multiprocessing.Pool full of sharks

I really dig Itamar's writing style: It’s time for another deep-dive into Python brokenness and the pain that is POSIX system programming, this time with exciting and not very convincing shark-themed metaphors! There's a lot to learn here, and it's not all Python specific. Hop in, the water's warm (but filled with sharks)!

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Brenna Heaps Tidelift

How should you use funding for your open source project?

I think the consensus agrees that sustaining open source software takes more than just money. And yet money often remains a crucial part of a larger need for open source to sustain AND thrive. So, if that's the case...how should you use funding for your open source project? Brenna Heaps writes on the Tidelift blog: We’ve been speaking with a lot of open source maintainers about how to get paid and what that might mean for their project, and the same question keeps popping up: What do I do with the money? The tldr? Fund the project, community engagement, and pay it forward... But, it's a short read and worth it — so go read this and then share it with your fellow maintainers.

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Joseph Jacks docs.google.com

The $100M+ revenue commercial open source software company index

Have you seen this spreadsheet of open source software companies from Joseph Jacks? The criteria to be added to the sheet is; the company generates $100M+ revenue (recurring or not) OR generate the equivalent of $25M of revenue per quarter. These companies have found a way to build a very large business around one or many open source software projects. Anyone on this index surprise you?

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Nick Salloum callmenick.com

CSS only floated labels with :placeholder-shown pseudo class

Nick Salloum: When we’re dealing with inputs, there’s a host of techniques to consider in order to give users the best experience. We need to make sure that we’re giving users necessary information at all points in time, and that means finding the balance between too much and too little. Time and time again we've been told that having a proper label is a better UX. The thing is, having a bunch of labels on a form can start to look congested. This solution is a great one, and saves us from having to use JavaScript.

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Kubernetes kubernetes.io

Kubernetes now has a non-code contributor’s guide

Just in time for #Hacktoberfest! The Non-Code Contributor’s Guide aims to make it easy for anyone to contribute to the Kubernetes project in a way that makes sense for them. This can be in many forms, technical and non-technical, based on the person’s knowledge of the project and their available time. Most individuals are not developers, and most of the world’s developers are not paid to fully work on open source projects. Based on this we have started an ever-growing list of possible ways to contribute to the Kubernetes project in a Non-Code way!

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Rachel Andrew rachelandrew.co.uk

The way we talk about CSS

Rachel Andrew: There is frequently talk about how developers whose main area of expertise is CSS feel that their skills are underrated. I do not think we help our cause by talking about CSS as this whacky, quirky language. CSS is unlike anything else, because it exists to serve an environment that is unlike anything else. Rachel makes a great point. We give others permission to talk badly about CSS and the immensely valuable skill of writing it, when we also don't assign it the deserved respect.

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