Chris Siebenmann utcc.utoronto.ca

Go is Google's language, not ours

Fellow Gophers and Go Time fans out there, I’d love to hear your thoughts on this post from Chris Siebenmann. Go has community contributions but it is not a community project. It is Google’s project. This is an unarguable thing, whether you consider it to be good or bad, and it has effects that we need to accept. For example, if you want some significant thing to be accepted into Go, working to build consensus in the community is far less important than persuading the Go core team. In general, it’s extremely clear that the community’s voice doesn’t matter very much for Go’s development, and those of us working with Go outside Google’s walls just have to live with that.

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GoCD Icon GoCD – Sponsored

Continuous delivery for microservices blog series

If you run and deploy microservices, this blog series from the GoCD will be a great guide for you and your team as you navigate testing, feature toggles, and more. 5 considerations for continuous delivery of microservices Test strategy for microservices Trunk based development and feature toggles Environment strategy for continuous delivery of microservices Configuration strategy for continuous delivery of microservices

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freeCodeCamp Icon freeCodeCamp

CSS rules that will make your life easier

This is a solid set of recommendations from Nick Gard that will help you keep your CSS in order and in good shape. There’s a lot of rules that relate to accessibility, others to consistency, and some just to simple maintainability, but all are good to at least consider. After years of writing and maintaining a couple of very large web projects and numerous smaller ones, I have developed some heuristics for writing maintainable CSS. I have used BEM, SMACSS, and CSS Modules for naming, though this article is not about naming, per se. (I tend to use a mix of atomic classes and BEM-ish naming.) This article is more about the properties and values I use or avoid.

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Go github.com

Get unlimited Google Drive storage by splitting binary files into base64

A clever hack that is now being investigated by Google’s internal forums. How it works: Google Docs take up 0 bytes of quota in your Google Drive Split up binary files into Google Docs, with base64 encoded text Encoded file is always larger than the original. Base64 encodes binary data to a ratio of about 4:3. A single doc can store ~1 million characters. This is around 710KB of base64 encoded data.

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JavaScript jrsinclair.com

Elegant error handling with the JavaScript Either monad

This is an absolute mindbender if you’re not already deeply in the functional world, but this post by James Sinclair is also a readable & fascinating look at how to incrementally move from a try/catch error management approach to a fully functional approach. In this article, we’ll assume you already know about function composition and currying. If you need a minute to brush up on those, that’s totally OK. And a word of warning. If you haven’t come across things like monads before, they might seem really… different. Working with tools like these takes a mind shift. And that can be hard work to start with.

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Brain Science cognitiontoday.com

You procrastinate because of emotions, not laziness

Hey fellow Brain Science fans, this one is for you. I’ve had a relationship with procrastination that’s similar to this headline and, with time, I’ve found that it’s an emotional state, not a permanent personal quality. Quotable: “People procrastinate or avoid aversive tasks to improve their short-term mood at the cost of long-term goals.” TL;DR our unconscious mind is looking to be kind to us, not harm us. By changing the internal narrative, we can adjust our response.

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Stephen Wolfram blog.stephenwolfram.com

Free Wolfram Engine for developers

From Stephen Wolfram himself on his personal blog: Why aren’t you using our technology? It happens far too often. … Sometimes the answer is yes. But too often, there’s an awkward silence, and then they’ll say, “Well, no. Could I?” Here’s the kicker for open source developers… If you’re making a free, open-source system, you can apply for a Free Production License. In the license it says “Open-source projects approved by Wolfram,” which seems like they’re going to maintain a list of approved projects, but Stephan mentioned that they’re still working out the kinks in usage and licensing and they “are committed to providing predictable and straightforward licensing for the long term.”

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Rollbar Icon Rollbar – Sponsored

Where are JavaScript errors logged?

Have you ever wondered how and where JavaScript errors are logged? Unlike other web languages, JavaScript was originally a client-side language. As a result, error handling is designed with the client side in mind, rather than the server side. Rather than dealing with log files, rotation, permissions, and all the other fun things that come with server-side languages, JavaScript errors are dealt with inline.

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Owen Williams char.gd

GitHub's new features show it's finally listening to developers

The news about GitHub Sponsor is making the rounds. This post from Owen Williams highlights how GitHub is listening and putting their money where their mouth is, for the good of all of us. GitHub, it seems, is thriving again. It just showed the fruits of that labor, and what it looks like when a company is participating in the discussion in the open, listening to the developers that know it best. At an event called GitHub Satellite, the company unveiled the biggest set of new features in memory, all designed to address glaring problems the platform has faced for years. They’re designed to help make GitHub a better place to work, and contribute to the open source community as a whole.

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GitHub dependabot.com

Dependabot has been acquired by GitHub

More news out of today’s GitHub Satellite event, this time from a security angle. The implications of this acquisition from the horse’s mouth: We’re integrating Dependabot directly into GitHub, starting with security fix PRs 👮‍♂️ You can still install Dependabot from the GitHub Marketplace whilst we integrate it into GitHub, but it’s now free of charge 🎁 We’ve doubled the size of Dependabot’s team; expect lots of great improvements over the coming months 👩‍💻👨‍💻👩‍💻👨‍💻👩‍💻👨‍💻 Congrats to Grey, Harry and Philip!

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Sophie Alpert Increment

The benefits (and costs) of corporate open source

Sophie Alpert writes on Increment: Releasing and maintaining an open-source project at a corporation takes a lot of work. I saw this firsthand working for four-plus years on React, a popular open-source JavaScript library developed by Facebook. Many companies hope that releasing an open-source project will pay dividends in the form of code contributions from people outside the organization—but I’ve never seen that work in practice. Responding to issues, answering usage questions, carefully planning release schedules: It all takes time. Even code contributions, despite their reputation as the big reward that’s supposed to make corporate open source worthwhile, are rarely the panacea they’re made out to be. If you’re looking to optimize your company’s open source development strategy, read this!

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Andy Sparks holloway.com

Fundamentals of product-market fit

For the entrepreneurial type: this is a great dive into the fundamentals of product-market fit by @sparkszilla. The whole read is worth it if you’re interested in raising funds in the future. The heart of the article stems from three axiomatic theories: Rachleff’s Law of Startup Success: Rachleff says, “The #1 company-killer is lack of market. When a great team meets a lousy market, market wins. When a lousy team meets a great market, market wins. When a great team meets a great market, something special happens.” Rachleff’s Corollary of Startup Success: “The only thing that matters is getting to product-market fit.” BPMF and APMF: The lives of startups are divided into two categories, before product-market fit (BPMF) and after product-market fit (APMF). And the Vohra questionnaire to see if you have PMF is one I’ll keep on hand for the future. 👌

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Alanna Irving medium.com

Babel’s rise to financial sustainability

Check out this interview from Alanna Irving (Open Source Collective Executive Director) with Henry Zhu sharing the backstory of what went well for Babel to reach financial sustainability. Our ultimate goal was to help the project thrive. My personal goal was to help fund Logan, given he was working on his own time, and I figured that if I ever quit my job I might get funded someday too (which has now happened). I knew we would need some momentum and time for that to be possible, so we decided to make a start. When we first started the Babel Collective, we weren’t even bringing in $1k/month. Slowly we built up to $4k/month, which is when I left my job to focus on Babel. Recently our budget looks a lot bigger thanks to a $100,000 grant from Handshake, which we split out as $10k/month. Once that’s over, the total will be around $20k/month. Also, check out Alanna’s book — Better Work Together

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Mozilla Icon Mozilla

Mozilla has published their 2019 Internet Health Report

The report focuses on 5 questions about the internet. Is it safe? How open is it? Who is welcome? Who can succeed? Who controls it? The answer is complicated, and the report doesn’t make any particular conclusions so much as share a series of research & stories about each topic. Includes some fascinating looks at what’s going on in AI, inclusive design, open source, decentralization and more.

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Amila Welihinda amilajack.com

compat-db determines the browser compatibility of ALL browser APIs

This tool aims to go above & beyond what MDN and caniuse have accomplished by automating the generation of the compatibility tables for others to use. Access to the output is programmatic, which scales to more developers via tooling such as static analyzers. Click through for a deep-dive on how it works (spoiler: browserstack is involved) and how Amila optimized its required test executions by 95%.

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GraphQL nilan.netlify.com

GraphQL trends in 2019

GraphQL is exploding in popularity, and I love to see it getting moved out of Facebook and becoming a clearly independent project. Neat to see all the stuff happening in the community around it. The GraphQL Foundation announcement last year was another reassurance that GraphQL is here to stay, after Facebook granted full patent rights to all GraphQL users two years ago. While the legal situation around GraphQL is in the clear now, 4 years after its open-source release, the best practices and developments surrounding the still-emerging technology are still rapidly evolving. If you like this stuff, you might also like a couple episodes of JSParty. Episode #38 is an interview with John Resig about GraphQL, while episode #72 is a panel discussion on the evolution of state management, including GraphQL.

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