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Culture

Beliefs, behavioral patterns, thoughts, and institutions of the developer community.
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Eric Clemmons Medium

Work on features, not repositories

In response to a recent Twitter poll from Kent C. Dodds, Eric Clemmons shared concerns about how organizational boundaries are impacting where development happens. Kent tweeted... Hey folks who have a decoupled client-server application (no server rendering, server is just an API server). Where is your client code and server code located? (#) Together in one repo? In separate repos? Eric writes in his response on Medium: Software is like Jello: poke it in one place, and another place jiggles. In my experience, a repository should house all of the code necessary to make developing & shipping features relatively frictionless. This isn't an exact 1:1, but this was a big part of the reason why Segment transitioned back to a monorepo.

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Away from Keyboard Away from Keyboard #5

Justin Dorfman’s passion is advocating for developers

After a very difficult 2014 that put Justin Dorfman in the hospital, he vowed to never go back. Justin has Bipolar I disorder, so coming to terms with his limitations and the sacrifices he needs to make to stay healthy hasn't been easy. He talks to me about his early BMX dreams, his transition from engineering to marketing, and the stigma around mental health.

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Martin Fowler martinfowler.com

The state of agile software in 2018

Martin Fowler reflects on the journey of agile software development... Our challenge at the moment isn't making agile a thing that people want to do, it's dealing with what I call faux-agile: agile that's just the name, but none of the practices and values in place. Ron Jeffries often refers to it as "Dark Agile", or specifically "Dark Scrum". This is actually even worse than just pretending to do agile, it's actively using the name "agile" against the basic principles of what we were trying to do, when we talked about doing this kind of work in the late 90s at Snowbird. The three main challenges we should focus on are: fighting the Agile Industrial Complex and its habit of imposing process upon teams, raising the importance of technical excellence, and organizing our teams around products (rather than projects).

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Josh Comeau Medium

Lessons learned as a conference speaker

How do you develop an idea for a talk, determine the conferences to pitch, actually deliver the talk, and whether or not it's even worth doing? Joshua Comeau writes on Medium: I’m still very much at the beginning of my career. I’m only ~5 years into what will likely be a 40-year career, so I’m only about 1/8th through! That thought is simultaneously liberating and dizzying; it means I don’t have to feel rushed when it comes to making the most of every available opportunity, but it also means I have no clue what’s ahead. Conference-speaking is a worthwhile endeavor, but it’s one heck of a bumpy ride, and not always worth it. I’ll continue to prepare talks — as long as folks still want to hear what I have to say... Joshua ends with an invitation ... 👏 I encourage you to give it a shot. Feel free to reach out to me, I’m always happy to give your proposal a quick read :)

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Hongli Lai gdprbusters.com

Top GDPR questions for developers and startups

Prominent startup/developer forum Hacker News has shown us how shaken these two groups were. Most GDPR articles received hundreds of upvotes and comments. The reactions had a feeling of mass hysteria. This motivated me to embark on a mission to bring knowledge and peace of mind to the software developer and startup world. ... I initiated a number of AMAs -- Ask Me Anything discussions -- on a variety of forums. Here are the top questions I received... Hongli went on to answer questions like "Where do I begin with making sense of GDPR and what to tackle first?", "What are the most valuable online resources for getting actionable advice?", "Given that you have no business presence or interest in the EU, what is the worst thing that can happen if you're not compliant?" ...

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Harj Taggar Y Combinator

How to hire your first engineer

How do you convince an engineer to join your start up? Harj Taggar shares this advice on the Y Combinator blog: This post is advice for early stage startup founders who are hiring their first engineer. Hiring your first engineer at a startup is incredibly hard. As a founder you’re already stretched dangerously thin on time. There are bugs to fix, customers to close and any number of urgent existential fires that demand your full attention. You know you should be spending more time on hiring but it’s a battle to find it. This is an exhaustive post going through all the details. If you're a startup founder or among the first engineers to join a startup, you should check this post out or recommend it to your founder.

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Docker github.com

Docker can't be downloaded without logging into Docker Store

750 downvotes and counting on the comment below from Joao Fernandes, the Docs Lead for Docker Enterprise Edition. I know that this can feel like a nuisance, but we've made this change to make sure we can improve the Docker for Mac and Windows experience for users moving forward. As far as I can tell, the docs don't need changes, so I'll close this issue, but feel free to comment. Lots of comments are stacking up on Hacker News too.

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freeCodeCamp Icon freeCodeCamp

We fired our top talent. Best decision we ever made.

Would you fire your top contributor — someone with a deep understanding of your product’s architecture and a ton of domain-specific knowledge? Jonathan Solórzano-Hamilton writes on the freeCodeCamp blog about this exact scenario... “You will never be able to understand any of what I’ve created. I am Albert F#@$ing Einstein and you are all monkeys scrabbling in the dirt.” He declared this in front of the product design team, developers, management, and pre-launch customers. One of our project sponsors had the temerity to ask when the problem crippling our product would be fixed. No one gets a pass on being a jerk. I personally subscribe to the "no asshole rule," and do my best to purge the assholes as soon as possible. The sooner the better, for everyone. Have you heard of the book on the subject? Here's why Robert Sutton wrote 'The No Asshole Rule'

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Sarah Perez TechCrunch

Is Twitter breaking Twitter?

Twitter is at it again making controversial changes restricting how the developer community can use their APIs to develop 3rd party Twitter clients. Sarah Perez reports on TechCrunch: Twitter is breaking users' favorite third-party Twitter clients like Tweetbot and Twitterific by shutting off APIs these apps relied on. Worse still, is that Twitter isn't taking full responsibility for its decisions. In a company email it shared today, Twitter cited "technical and business constraints" that it can no longer ignore as being the reason behind the APIs' shutdown. This change sparked the #BreakingMyTwitter hashtag

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Mike McQuaid mikemcquaid.com

"This is why people don’t contribute to your open source project"

Do you want more contributors and maintainers on your project? Mike McQuaid, maintainer of Homebrew (macOS package manager), writes on his personal blog: Here are a a few guidelines in thinking about this: Most contributors were users first (“scratching your own itch”: most people start contributing to an open source project to solve a problem they are experiencing) Most maintainers were a contributor and user first (people don’t just jump into maintaining a project without helping to build it first) Maintainers cannot do a good job without remaining a user (to maintain context, passion and empathy) Combined, these start to look a bit like a sales funnel. People have to travel through each stage and there’s a fairly hefty drop-off at each one. Also check out ~> Open source maintainers owe you nothing

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The Changelog The Changelog #310

Open sourcing the DEV community

We talk with Ben Halpern the founder and webmaster of dev.to — a community for developers to talk about software. Last Wednesday they open sourced the codebase of the dev.to platform, so we wanted to talk through all the details with Ben. We talked through the backstory, how Ben realized this could become a business, how the team was formed, their motivations for open sourcing it and why they didn't open source it from the start, the technical stack, and their vision for the future of the site.

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Bryan Helmig zapier.com

The CTO journey at a small startup

Bryan Helmig writes on the Zapier engineering blog: As startups grow, we need to make tweaks to the way we work. I’ve found this especially true in engineering. As a co-founder and CTO, my own role has changed a lot over the years. My everyday duties and challenges have shifted, and I’ve had to alter my approach multiple times to help the company reach a new level. The growth stage between just the three of us and where we are today was pretty tricky. Read on for the lessons I've learned as I grew as a first time CTO... Hear Bryan's story on Founders Talk this Thursday.

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Richard Littauer Medium

How to get rid of maintainer guilt

If you're a maintainer who's feeling the burden of your open source software, you have a few options to consider according to Richard Littauer — you can... Onboard more maintainers - spread the burden to more of the community Clearly set expectations - explain your software is provided on an “as is” basis Hire a maintenance company - wait, what?! Is that we've come to? Are we now hiring code maintenance companies to maintain our open source? I'm actually quite interested in the economies around this, so let this post serve as an open invite to Richard to join me on Founders Talk for a discussion on the state of open source maintenance and his lessons learned building Maintainer Mountaineer.

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Bloomberg Icon Bloomberg

A big crypto sell-off is happening for Bitcoin and Ether

Bloomberg is citing a sell-off of Bitcoin, Ether, and dozens of smaller digital tokens. The "crypto exodus" is happening due to a "sense of panic" hitting crypto investors. It's been a brutal August for Bitcoin and Ether, with Bitcoin touching below $6,000. “The big story in the market today is the huge weakness in Ethereum,” Timothy Tam, chief executive officer of CoinFi said in a phone interview — “Bitcoin has held up relatively well versus Ethereum. It’s still quite weak versus the U.S. dollar.” While cryptocurrencies rallied in July on hopes that a Bitcoin-backed exchange-traded fund would attract new investors, U.S. regulators have yet to sign off on multiple proposals for such a product. The letdown has coincided with growing concern that entrepreneurs who raised crypto-denominated funds via initial coin offerings (ICO) are now cashing out of holdings such as Ether, the token for the Ethereum blockchain that is a popular platform for crypto projects. What do you think? Are you selling, buying, or holding?

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The New Stack Icon The New Stack

The people pushing for a decentralized web

David Cassel has a great recap of the recent Decentralized Web Summit and what it was all about. It’s a follow-up to a similar event in 2016, though now “People are starting to show real working code and real projects. They’re building whole technology stacks that are more decentralized, in large part fueled by the excitement of the cryptocurrency systems. The altcoins and Bitcoins are proving that interesting and complicated systems are starting to work out there.” Click through for lots of quotes and takeaways. I think Changelog might have to get involved if they do this again next year...

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Stack Overflow stackoverflow.blog

Stack Overflow has a new Code of Conduct

Stack Overflow began be telling their community to "be nice," but over time that proved to not be enough to ensure a safe place for the developer community. Tim Post, Director Of Community Strategy, writes on the Stack Overflow blog: Our CoC is what we call a living document. It’s designed to change over time to ensure that it remains relevant by continuing to meet the needs of our communities. Every six months or so, we plan to find out how folks feel about how things are going by asking both new and experienced users about their recent experiences on the site. Hopefully this change leads to a less toxic experience.

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Away from Keyboard Away from Keyboard #3

Ashley Baxter is excited about… insurance?

Thirteen years ago, Ashley Baxter inherited the family insurance business when her Dad passed away. Even though she's a talented photographer, and built a successful photography business, the insurance industry kept calling her name. Ashley talks about what excites her about insurance, the challenges of running a business, and how burnout forced her to focus.

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Lara Hogan larahogan.me

Lara Hogan's guide to writing a "Week in Review" doc

The important thing to remember about leading is you have to have clear lines of communication with those you lead. I love the ideas Lara shared in this guide to writing a "week in review" team update. This doc helped me set records straight, disseminate info to lots of people at once, and open up conversation internally, while reflecting on the themes that had come up in weekly one-on-ones, backchannels, team meetings, etc. What I chose to write about each time widely varied. Though the teams who reported to me were the primary audience for this doc, I kept it internally-public, meaning that anyone at the company could read and comment in it. I found that some other managers just weren’t talking about hard things that were happening...

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