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JavaScript is an object-oriented programming language used alongside HTML and CSS to give functionality to web pages.
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Crowdsourcing the evolution of text parsing with unified

unified –for the uninitiated– is an interface for processing text with syntax trees and transforming between them. Maybe you’ve never heard of it, but you’ve probably relied on it as part of your software infrastructure: [unified] has been OSS for years, but has recently gotten more traction. It’s used in fancy technology such as MDX, Gatsby, and Prettier, and used to build things like Node’s docs, freeCodeCamp, and GitHub’s open source guide. Project’s like unified are crucial to the JavaScript ecosystem, but they’re difficult to fund and support toward sustainability. Hence, the unified collective. Today, we are pleased to announce the creation of the unified collective. It’s an effort to bring together like-minded organisations to collaboratively work on the innovation of content through seamless, interchangeable, and extendible tooling. We build parsers, transformers, and utilities so that others don’t have to worry about syntax. We make it easier for developers to develop. Let’s show these maintainers some 💚 and share this around to those who should be supporting it.

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JavaScript 2018.stateofjs.com

The 2018 State of JS results are in! 🔥

The results are in and JavaScript continues to take over the world! Over 20,000 developers were surveyed about JavaScript including JS variants, frameworks, tooling, and demographics. Of particular interest is the Opinions sections which compares results to previous years to show how developer sentiment is trending regarding satisfaction with the language and the ecosystem.

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Scott Jehl filamentgroup.com

Inlining or caching? Both please!

I was exploring patterns that enable the browser to render a page as fast as possible by including code alongside the initial HTML so that the browser has everything it needs to start rendering the page, without making additional requests. Our two go-to options to achieve this goal are inlining and server push (more on how we use those), but each has drawbacks: inlining prevents a file from being cached for reuse, and server push is still a bit experimental, with some browser bugs still being worked out. As I was preparing to describe these caveats, I thought, “I wonder if the new Service Worker and Caching APIs could enable caching for inline code.” I’ve been dabbling a bit with service workers over on Brightly Colored to improve the loading time, so this exploration of caching inline CSS is fascinating. In fact, I used to completely inline all the CSS on the site, but switched to a file request because of the way I thought service workers, well… worked. Surprisingly, this implementation doesn’t look too difficult.

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JavaScript blog.mgechev.com

Guess.js - a toolkit for enabling data-driven user-experiences on the web

Our goal with Guess.js is to minimize your bundle layout configuration, make it data-driven, and much more accurate! In the end, you should lazy load all your routes and Guess.js will figure out which bundles to be combined together and what pre-fetching mechanism to be used! All this in less than 5 minutes setup time. That’s an excellent goal! But how will that work? During the build process, the GuessPlugin will fetch report from Google Analytics, build a model used for predictive pre-fetching and add a small runtime to the main bundle of your application. On route change, the runtime will query the generated model for the pages that are likely to be visited next and pre-fetch the associated with them JavaScript bundles. The tool was announced at Google I/O back in May, but as of today it’s still in alpha.

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Electron minbrowser.github.io

Min – a smarter, faster web browser

I love how people continue to experiment in browserland. Min has some cool stuff going: Tabs in Min take up less space, giving you more room to browse the web. Pages you haven’t looked at in a while fade out, letting you see what’s important, and Focus Mode hides your other tabs to prevent you from getting distracted. It also sports built-in ad blocking (table stakes for new browsers to compete?) and DDG integration in the search bar. Min is built on Electron, so while it may be fast it possibly isn’t memory efficient. But what browser is, these days? It’s also worth noting that Min runs on an older version of Chromium, so it’s likely missing some security fixes. (More on that right here.)

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Lee Byron Medium

Introducing the GraphQL Foundation

The Linux Foundation is essentially a foundation for foundations, and the newest member to join the ranks is the GraphQL Foundation. We’ve been tracking news and talking about GraphQL for some time now. Back in 2012 Nick Schrock, Dan Schafer, and Lee Byron got together at Facebook to build the next generation of Facebook’s iOS app powered by a new API for News Feed — what they arrived at was the first version of GraphQL. Lee Byron has this to say about today’s announcement: Today, GraphQL has been a community project longer than it was a Facebook internal project — which calls for its next evolution. As one of GraphQL’s co-creators, I’ve been amazed and proud to see it grow in adoption since its open sourcing. Through the formation of the GraphQL Foundation, I hope to see GraphQL become industry standard by encouraging contributions from a broader group and creating a shared investment in vendor-neutral events, documentation, tools, and support. So who’s involved? Well, GraphQL Foundation is being created in partnership with the Linux Foundation, Facebook, and nearly a dozen other companies. Those “other companies” are likely large scale companies who’ve contributed to or are using GraphQL in production and have a vested interest in its future.

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Electron github.com

Pennywise – a cross-platform app to open anything in a floating window

Sometimes you’re watching YouTube or referencing some documentation while you code and you just want that particular window to stay in view no matter what else you’re up to. This does just that (and only that). Pennywise allows you to open anything in a small floating window that always stays on top of the other applications all the time, allowing you to multitask with ease

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JavaScript ably.io

WebSockets – a conceptual deep-dive

This is a nice, deep primer on WebSockets. It includes some web history, describes WebSockets in detail, and catalogs available libraries you can use to get started with them. Here’s the intro to the topic: In a nutshell, WebSockets are a thin transport layer built on top of a device’s TCP/IP stack. The intent is to provide what is essentially an as-close-to-raw-as-possible TCP communication layer to web application developers while adding a few abstractions to eliminate certain friction that would otherwise exist concerting the way the web works.

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GraphQL github.com

A lightweight (and isomorphic) GraphQL client for JavaScript

GraphQL is based on a very simple HTTP transaction, which sends a request to an endpoint with query and variables. Many libraries require complex stacks to make that simple request. In any project you don’t use React, Relay, you’ll need a simpler client which manages your query and makes a simple request. Isomorphic, in case you were wondering, means it runs both on the client and the server.

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Alex Buzin Hackernoon

Writing a JavaScript tweening engine with Between.js

Alex Buzin: A month ago I decided to try my skills in writing own tweening engine and here’s how I did it… Tweening, in case you’re wondering, is the process of animating an object from one position to another. You specify the start/end positions (or images) and the tweening engine handles all of the inbetween states. This post by Alex is a great way to introduce yourself to the topic.

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React djangostars.com

What and how to test with Jest and Enzyme

Testing React components may be challenging for beginners and experienced developers who have already worked with tests. It may be interesting to compare your own approaches with the ones we use in our project. In order to cover the codebase, you have to know which components must be tested and which code exactly in component should be covered.

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Node.js medium.com

The Node.js Foundation and JS Foundation intend to push the merge button

Hot off the press: An intent to merge means that we the boards of both Foundations have agreed to public discussions related to a possible merger. We have not made any formal decisions at this point regarding a new or merged Foundation and its potential organizational structure, governance policies, technical framework or leadership. This will be formalized based on feedback from the Node.js and JavaScript communities. There will be a panel and Q&A at Node+JS Interactive next week and you know that the JS Party crew will be there with the full coverage. 💪

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