Zach Holman zachholman.com

UTC is enough for everyone, right?

Programming around time is the bane of pretty much every programmer’s existence. UTC works most of the time, but still has its flaws. Zach Holman writes on his blog: Programming time, dates, timezones, recurring events, leap seconds… everything is pretty terrible. The common refrain in the industry is Just use UTC! Just use UTC! And that’s correct…sort of. But if you’re stuck building software that deals with time, there’s so much more to consider. It’s time…to talk about time. Zach includes a lot of time-related puns and whole lot of wisdom about programming time.

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DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

DigitalOcean’s Managed Kubernetes service is now production ready

To coincide with the first day of CNCF’s Kubecon event, DigitalOcean has announced that their Managed Kubernetes services is now production ready and generally available. When we introduced DigitalOcean Kubernetes last year, we made it possible for you to spin up Kubernetes in minutes. With our simple and scalable Kubernetes service, all you need to do is define the size and location of your worker nodes, while DigitalOcean provisions, manages, and optimizes the services needed to run your Kubernetes cluster.

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OpenAI Icon OpenAI

OpenAI Fellows — Fall 2018 (now open)

As we gear up for the launch of Practical AI and more AI/ML/DS related news coverage, I wanted to bring to your attention to this 6-month apprenticeship (compensated) in AI research at OpenAI. We’re now accepting applications for the next cohort of OpenAI Fellows, a program which offers a compensated 6-month apprenticeship in AI research at OpenAI. We designed this program for people who want to be an AI researcher, but do not have a formal background in the field. Applications for Fellows starting in September are open now and will close on July 8th at 12AM PST. Apply here.

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Eileen Uchitelle GitHub

Upgrading GitHub from Rails 3.2 to 5.2

Eileen Uchitelle: In total the project took a year and a half to upgrade from Rails 3.2 to Rails 5.2. Along the way we took time to clean up technical debt and improve the overall codebase while doing the upgrade. Below we’ll talk about how we upgraded Rails, lessons we learned and whether we’d do it again. Congrats to Eileen and the team on this massive effort! Click through to read how they did it and the lessons the learned along the way.

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TypeScript github.com

A secure TypeScript runtime on V8

If you need a JS runtime that supports TypeScript out of the box and has security as a top-most priority, star this repo and come back when it’s no longer “Segfaulty”. Feature bullets! 👇 No package.json, no npm. Not backwards compatible with Node Single executable Defaults to read-only file system access Always dies on uncaught errors Supports top-level await EDIT: it’s worth noting that this project is by Ryan Dahl, inventor of Node.js.

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Rollbar Icon Rollbar – Sponsored

Reduce the noise in error monitoring with Grouping Suggestions

A major problem in monitoring is dealing with noise. We don’t want to miss important signals, but sorting through all the noise can be a CHORE. A feature just released from Rollbar will help you get closer to that optimal setup faster, with less work — it’s called Grouping Suggestions. The best part is the developer experience of this new feature. If you don’t have time right now to setup grouping, you can start with the default grouping rules, manually merge errors opportunistically while in Rollbar and accept grouping suggestions as you triage errors. Integrate Rollbar for free + get $100 to donate on OpenCollective — head to rollbar.com/changelog.

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Justin Sisley github.com

mostly – a full stack web app starter kit built on Node.js

mostly’s purpose is to serve as a lightweight, easy-to-comprehend starting point, with a focus on providing a great developer experience while helping you get high quality and maintainable web applications deployed rapidly. It uses Express for the server and React for the client. Worth a look if you’re starting up a new web project. I dig this point about it: Nothing is hidden, nothing is magical, and all of the “plumbing” is accessible and simple.

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Dimitri Fontaine tapoueh.org

Database modeling anti-patterns 🙅‍♀️

Dimitri Fontaine shares 3 classic data-modeling anti-patterns. The UUID section lacks strong argumentation, but the real gem in this article is his advice at the end. A snippet: My advice is to always normalize your database model first, and then only fix the problems you have with that when you actually have them. Well except in those 3% of cases where really, really, it should be done in the design phase of the project. It’s quite hard to recognize those 3% though, and that ability is hard gained with experience. Experience is the ultimate teacher.

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Nathan Sobo github.com

Xray – the Atom team's experimental new text editor

An exciting new project from Nathan Sobo and team: an experimental Electron-based text editor informed by what we’ve learned in the four years since the launch of Atom … this project is a testbed for rapidly iterating on several radical ideas without risking the stability of Atom Xray’s priorities are high performance, collaboration, extensibility, and web compatibility. Needless to say, we’ll be keeping our 👀 on this project over the coming months.

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Zack Whittaker zdnet.com

I asked Apple for all my data. Here's what was sent back.

Zack Whittaker writes for Zero Day: Apple gave me all the data it collected on me since I bought my first iPhone — in 2010. This is what has largely stood out to me in the ongoing discussion about what data the four have on me and how they use it… As insightful as it was, Apple’s treasure trove of my personal data is a drop in the ocean to what social networks or search giants have on me, because Apple is primarily a hardware maker and not ad-driven, like Facebook and Google, which use your data to pitch you ads. Want to request your data? It takes just a few seconds…

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