Zack Whittaker zdnet.com

I asked Apple for all my data. Here's what was sent back.

Zack Whittaker writes for Zero Day:

Apple gave me all the data it collected on me since I bought my first iPhone — in 2010.

This is what has largely stood out to me in the ongoing discussion about what data the four have on me and how they use it…

As insightful as it was, Apple’s treasure trove of my personal data is a drop in the ocean to what social networks or search giants have on me, because Apple is primarily a hardware maker and not ad-driven, like Facebook and Google, which use your data to pitch you ads.

Want to request your data? It takes just a few seconds…

DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

Kubernetes for full-stack developers

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Whether you’re curious to know more about Kubernetes, just getting started, or have experience with it, this curriculum on DigitalOcean’s Community will help you learn more about Kubernetes and running containerized applications.

You’ll learn about core Kubernetes concepts and use them to deploy and scale applications in practical tutorials. By the end of this curriculum you’ll be able to create your own Kubernetes cluster from scratch and run your own applications on it. You will also learn how to set up monitoring, alerting, and automation for your applications on Kubernetes.

Oh, and if you’re creating a new DigitalOcean account head to do.co/changelog get $100 in credit to your account.

VS Code github.com

Run VS Code on any server over SSH

sshcode is a CLI to automatically install and run code-server over SSH. It uploads your extensions and settings automatically, so you can seamlessly use remote servers as VS Code hosts.

If you have Chrome installed, it opens the browser in app mode. That means there’s no keybind conflicts, address bar, or indication that you’re coding within a browser. It feels just like native VS Code.

Run VS Code on any server over SSH

JavaScript serviceworke.rs

The Service Worker Cookbook

a collection of working, practical examples of using service workers in modern web sites.

From caching strategies, to web push, to going offline and optimizing performance; this cookbook is chocked full of great recipes. There’s also a comments section at the bottom of each recipe where people are answer the question, “Has it been useful?” Now that’s useful!

Matthias Endler matthias-endler.de

Ten years of Vim

Matthias Endler shares his Vim experience by looking back after using the venerable text editor for 10 years. Would he go back and learn it all over again?

On one side, I would say no. There’s a steep learning curve in Vim and seeing all those modern IDEs become better at understanding the user’s intent, editing text became way easier and faster in general.

On the other side, Vim is the fastest way for me to write down my thoughts and code. As a bonus, it runs on every machine and might well be around in decades to come. In contrast, I don’t know if the IntelliJ shortcuts will be relevant in ten years (note: if you read this in the future and ask yourself “What is IntelliJ?”, the answer might be no).

Definitely click through to read his takeways, too. Oh, and it’s worth mentioning that the JS Party panel went deep on Vim (by accident?) for the next episode.

Diego Bernardes github.com

Flare – a service that notifies of HTTP endpoint changes

Flare listens to changes on HTTP endpoints and notify subscripted clients about the changes. It help reduce the pressure on APIs by avoiding the clients to do pooling requests to search for new/changed content and the need of the APIs to develop workers to notify the clients about the.

Pitched as useful for microservice architectures, but could find lots of uses outside of that context too.

Anil Dash Medium

What if JavaScript wins?

Very insightful post from Anil Dash about the impact of network effects on JavaScript and coding culture.

Anil writes on his Medium:

What this suggests is that JavaScript may be reaching escape velocity as a network, and as an ecosystem of related technologies. To be clear, there’s no winner-takes-all here — domain-specific languages will always have their uniquely valuable areas of focus. But for general-purpose coding? Everything from spreadsheet macros to Internet of Things hardware seems to default to having JavaScript be one of the primary ways to make things programmable.

Rust github.com

Look ma, no Electron!

A desktop Kanban board app built with Elm and Rust. How do they do it sans Electron?

it uses native WebView (WebKit for Linux/macOS, and MSHTML on Windows)

For more details see here. I’d love to see how this app performs in terms of memory use when compared to an Electron-based version. How big are the wins? Is the trade-off worth it? Sounds like great fodder for blog post…

Look ma, no Electron!

Node.js hackernoon.com

A crash course on Serverless with Node.js

If you’ve heard of serverless’ virtues, but have never taken that first step toward trying it out, this crash course is for you. Here’s how you might feel by the end:

What a journey. You have now witnessed the transition from traditional web development into the serverless revolution. With these simple tools we now have everything we need to create awesome, scalable, and reliable applications.

In my humble opinion, this is all still too much work for most of us to go through. AWS needs some serious competition in this space. Said competition is undoubtedly on the way.

JavaScript debuggerdotbreak.judahgabriel.com

I built a PWA and published it in three app stores. Here’s what i learned...

Judah Gabriel starts this post off with the question “Why even put your app in the app stores? Just live on the opened web!” — and I don’t fully disagree, until you think about where your users will come from.

The answer, in a nutshell, is because that’s where the users are. We’ve trained a generation of users to find apps in proprietary app stores, not on the free and open web.

There are many more lessons learned about the process — from creation to submission — but here’s the tldr…

Turning a web app into a Progressive Web App (PWA) and submitting it to 3 app stores requires about a month of work, a few hundred dollars, and lots of red tape.

(We’re planning a deep-dive on PWAs for an upcoming episode of JS Party. Subscribe to be notified.)

Practices volument.com

Minimalism — the most undervalued development skill

If you want a cheap trick to make a difference — here’s one: minimalism. Focus on the bare essentials and get rid of the rest. It’s an easy way to differentiate, because most others are doing the opposite: tons of crap.

This article is brimming with superb advice. The thing about minimalism is that it’s extremely easy to talk about doing, but difficult to put in practice. Those who master it can truly differentiate themselves.

Netflix Technology Blog Icon Netflix Technology Blog

Open sourcing Zuul 2

Netflix open sourced their cloud gateway:

The Cloud Gateway team at Netflix runs and operates more than 80 clusters of Zuul 2, sending traffic to about 100 (and growing) backend service clusters which amounts to more than 1 million requests per second.

Pretty impressive. Click through to get the details of how Zuul 2 works and how they use it inside Netflix. I love when companies who are operating at webscale (😏) share their practices and code with the rest of us.

Mislav Cimperšak github.com

An Awesome™ List of useless and funny dev projects

I bet everybody has heard about popular lists such as awesome-python, awesome-shell, awesome-cms and such and find them incredibly valuable. Well… Awesome Dev Fun list is on the other side of that spectrum. It’s a curated list of awesome funny libs/packages/languages that have no real value or purpose but to make a developer chuckle.

If we can’t have fun (and poke fun at ourselves), what’s the point of it all? Also this list is embarrassingly short, y’all. Gentlepeople, fire up your PR engines…

Kyle Mathews gatsbyjs.org

GatsbyJS raised a $3.8M seed round and is now a startup

Well, Gatsby is officially a startup! They just announced the formation of Gatsby Inc. and have raised a $3.8M seed round to fund the effort. Wow, congrats Kyle and team.

Kyle Matthews writes on the Gatsby blog:

I’m thrilled to announce the formation of Gatsby Inc. Based on the open source project Gatsby I founded, Gatsby the company will make feature-rich and blazing-fast websites easier to build and run.

What is Gatsby?

Gatsby is…

  • a blazing fast static site generator for React.js
  • a powerful and flexible modern website framework that simplifies every step of starting, developing and running websites
  • helps you leverage open source innovations in the React, NPM, and Gatsby communities for your web projects
  • lets you pull data into pages from WordPress, Drupal, Contentful, markdown—and any other data source you can imagine
  • compiles and optimizes your site’s code to make your sites lightning fast—even on mobile
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