VS Code github.com

Run VS Code on any server over SSH

sshcode is a CLI to automatically install and run code-server over SSH. It uploads your extensions and settings automatically, so you can seamlessly use remote servers as VS Code hosts. If you have Chrome installed, it opens the browser in app mode. That means there’s no keybind conflicts, address bar, or indication that you’re coding within a browser. It feels just like native VS Code.

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Diego Bernardes github.com

Flare – a service that notifies of HTTP endpoint changes

Flare listens to changes on HTTP endpoints and notify subscripted clients about the changes. It help reduce the pressure on APIs by avoiding the clients to do pooling requests to search for new/changed content and the need of the APIs to develop workers to notify the clients about the. Pitched as useful for microservice architectures, but could find lots of uses outside of that context too.

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DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

How to build and install Go programs

From the how to code in Go series on DigitalOcean’s Community site from our friends at Gopher Guides (Mark Bates & Cory LaNou). In Go, the process of translating source code into a binary executable is called building. Once this executable is built, it will contain not only your application, but also all the support code needed to execute the binary on the target platform. This means that a Go binary does not need system dependencies such as Go tooling to run on a new system, unlike other languages like Ruby, Python, or Node.js.

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Matthias Endler matthias-endler.de

Ten years of Vim

Matthias Endler shares his Vim experience by looking back after using the venerable text editor for 10 years. Would he go back and learn it all over again? On one side, I would say no. There’s a steep learning curve in Vim and seeing all those modern IDEs become better at understanding the user’s intent, editing text became way easier and faster in general. On the other side, Vim is the fastest way for me to write down my thoughts and code. As a bonus, it runs on every machine and might well be around in decades to come. In contrast, I don’t know if the IntelliJ shortcuts will be relevant in ten years (note: if you read this in the future and ask yourself “What is IntelliJ?”, the answer might be no). Definitely click through to read his takeways, too. Oh, and it’s worth mentioning that the JS Party panel went deep on Vim (by accident?) for the next episode.

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Anil Dash Medium

What if JavaScript wins?

Very insightful post from Anil Dash about the impact of network effects on JavaScript and coding culture. Anil writes on his Medium: What this suggests is that JavaScript may be reaching escape velocity as a network, and as an ecosystem of related technologies. To be clear, there’s no winner-takes-all here — domain-specific languages will always have their uniquely valuable areas of focus. But for general-purpose coding? Everything from spreadsheet macros to Internet of Things hardware seems to default to having JavaScript be one of the primary ways to make things programmable.

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Netflix Technology Blog Icon Netflix Technology Blog

Open sourcing Zuul 2

Netflix open sourced their cloud gateway: The Cloud Gateway team at Netflix runs and operates more than 80 clusters of Zuul 2, sending traffic to about 100 (and growing) backend service clusters which amounts to more than 1 million requests per second. Pretty impressive. Click through to get the details of how Zuul 2 works and how they use it inside Netflix. I love when companies who are operating at webscale (😏) share their practices and code with the rest of us.

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Mislav Cimperšak github.com

An Awesome™ List of useless and funny dev projects

I bet everybody has heard about popular lists such as awesome-python, awesome-shell, awesome-cms and such and find them incredibly valuable. Well… Awesome Dev Fun list is on the other side of that spectrum. It’s a curated list of awesome funny libs/packages/languages that have no real value or purpose but to make a developer chuckle. If we can’t have fun (and poke fun at ourselves), what’s the point of it all? Also this list is embarrassingly short, y’all. Gentlepeople, fire up your PR engines…

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GitPrime Icon GitPrime – Sponsored

20 patterns to watch for in your engineering team

20 Patterns is a collection of work patterns GitPrime has observed in working with hundreds of software teams. Each chapter provides actionable and straightforward advice on how to respond to various work patterns as they arise. As I read this, I could picture the engineers I’ve worked with: those who helped level up their team, those who made our codebase more maintainable, and those who may have caused more problems than they solved. This book will be wildly helpful as engineering managers look for opportunities to coach and celebrate their teammates. —Lara Hogan, Engineering Leadership Coach and Consultant at Wherewithall Learn more and download the book.

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Node.js hackernoon.com

A crash course on Serverless with Node.js

If you’ve heard of serverless’ virtues, but have never taken that first step toward trying it out, this crash course is for you. Here’s how you might feel by the end: What a journey. You have now witnessed the transition from traditional web development into the serverless revolution. With these simple tools we now have everything we need to create awesome, scalable, and reliable applications. In my humble opinion, this is all still too much work for most of us to go through. AWS needs some serious competition in this space. Said competition is undoubtedly on the way.

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JavaScript debuggerdotbreak.judahgabriel.com

I built a PWA and published it in three app stores. Here’s what i learned...

Judah Gabriel starts this post off with the question “Why even put your app in the app stores? Just live on the opened web!” — and I don’t fully disagree, until you think about where your users will come from. The answer, in a nutshell, is because that’s where the users are. We’ve trained a generation of users to find apps in proprietary app stores, not on the free and open web. There are many more lessons learned about the process — from creation to submission — but here’s the tldr… Turning a web app into a Progressive Web App (PWA) and submitting it to 3 app stores requires about a month of work, a few hundred dollars, and lots of red tape. (We’re planning a deep-dive on PWAs for an upcoming episode of JS Party. Subscribe to be notified.)

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Pēteris Caune healthchecks.io

Healthchecks – a watchdog for your cron jobs

I’ve wanted this for years, but apparently never enough to build it myself: A passive monitoring tool written in Python & Django. Set up your cron jobs, backup scripts, weekly email sending scripts, nightly data import jobs etc. to ping this service when they complete. When they don’t send a ping on time, you receive an alert. The service offers a generous 20 free checks before you start paying. And since it’s an open source Django app, you can set it up to run on your own infrastructure too.

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React docz.site

Docz – it has never been so easy to document your things!

Docz’ high-level principles give you an idea of what they’re all about: Zero config and easy. No unnecessary build steps with confusing setups. Blazing fast. Always use the fastest things to build our tools. Easy to customize. Create something that will be easy to use and customize. MDX Based. Have the best standard to write documents. Pluggable. Plugins are the best choice when you need to be custom and flexible. Watch the demo video on the homepage to see just how nice this tool is to use.

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