Daniel Stenberg daniel.haxx.se

This is how I git

Daniel Stenberg:

Every now and then I get questions on how to work with git in a smooth way when developing, bug-fixing or extending curl – or how I do it. After all, I work on open source full time which means I have very frequent interactions with git (and GitHub). Simply put, I work with git all day long. Ordinary days, I issue git commands several hundred times.

I have a very simple approach and way of working with git in curl. This is how it works.

Russ Cox github.com

Russ Cox's experimental new refactoring tool for Go

It’s just 18 commits deep at the time of logging, but when one of Go’s authors fires up a new project (and a refactoring tool at that), it’s worth following along to see what develops.

Just how raw is this effort? The README only states:

rf is an experimental refactoring tool. It is very much a work in progress. rf is incredibly rough and likely to be buggy and change incompatibly.

I gave the repo a quick cloneing to see what I could see, but go get failed due to a missing file reference so it’s definitely in a “wait and see” status unless you’re up for some hacking.

Tidelift Icon Tidelift – Sponsored

Best practices for managing your open source artifacts

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Does your development team struggle to manage the hairball of open source components that are now part of your applications and keep them up to date and secure? Do you ever dream about having one place where you can find and store “known good” open source packages that are pre-vetted and pre-approved for use in building applications?

Watch this on-demand webinar to hear JFrog senior product manager Mark Galpin and Tidelift co-founder Havoc Pennington share the latest best practices organizations can use to manage their open source dependencies well.

Go roland.zone

Benchmarking the M1 with the Go standard library

We are in a time where the open source tooling and developer story around Apple’s new M1 chip is all over our feeds. Among these was this interesting benchmark. It even highlights where a somewhat older Intel can still beat the M1, such as highly optimized crypto. In general, if your code relies on the Go parts more than native optimized code the M1 looks like a performance win.

Angie Rojas stackbuilders.com

Does Deno mean goodbye to Node.js?

Angie Rojas shared some insights into what Deno brings to the TypeScript ecosystem and whether or not it will “render Node.js obsolete.”

During the last 10 years, Node.js has become a big player in the backend framework market, powering several large scale applications across the globe. Meanwhile, JavaScript has also evolved greatly, not only because of the efforts of its development team, but also based on community feedback. However, integrating some of these new language features into a 10-year-old framework is not really straightforward, and has a high level of complexity.

Therefore we could say that Node.js’ architecture hasn’t evolved as fast as the language. As a basic example, Node.js is still based on callbacks, while there are far better ways to deal with asynchronicity in modern JavaScript. This is something that its creator, Ryan Dahl, has acknowledged in the past few years, and it has moved him to work on a new framework that addresses some of these issues. It is called Deno, and in the following article, we would like to explore some of its concepts to determine if it will render Node.js obsolete.

Morris Brodersen github.com

A case study on vanilla web development

It’s a TeuxDeux clone in plain HTML, CSS and JavaScript. More importantly, it’s a case study showing that vanilla web development is viable in terms of maintainability, and worthwhile in terms of performance.

There’s no custom framework invented here. Instead, the case study was designed to find minimum viable patterns that are truly vanilla (see the rules). The result is maintainable, albeit verbose and with considerable duplication in certain areas.

If anything, it shows the value frameworks provide, but also highlights how effective standard web technologies can be used.

DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

Use the 'Deploy to DigitalOcean' button to easily deploy open source apps

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With the recently released DigitalOcean App Platform in place — you can now deploy code by simply pointing to a GitHub repository, and the App Platform will do all the heavy lifting of managing the infrastructure, app runtimes, and dependencies.

DigitalOcean loves open source. Many of the libraries and frameworks we use at DigitalOcean are open source, and we always support initiatives that help the open source community thrive. We are excited to introduce the ‘Deploy to DigitalOcean’ button to help maintainers, contributors and consumers of open source software. Simply embed this button and associated link in your README.md files in GitHub repos, or web pages, and let us handle the app deployment process.

Rust github.com

An independent Rust text editor that runs in your terminal

Ox is a code editor. It was written in Rust using ANSI escape sequences. It assists developers with programming by providing several tools to speed up and make programming easier and a refreshing alternative to heavily bloated and resource hungry editors such as VS Code and JetBrains. Ox is lightweight so it can be used on older computers.

Bear in mind, this is a personal project and is nowhere near ready to replace your existing tools just yet.

Ox is stealing good ideas from existing editors and provides a rundown of what that means in the README. It works on Linux, macOS, and Windows via WSL.

An independent Rust text editor that runs in your terminal

Vitor Paladini DEV.to

How I manage impostor syndrome, fear of failure, and other common programmer problems

I’ve been in the industry for a while and experienced a lot of the “no-code problems” that affect us, programmers. I’m talking about impostor syndrome, comparing yourself to others, that kind of stuff.

I decided to write (and promote!) this article as a way to share my experience with beginners and help them deal with that kind of stuff.

Learn github.com

A roadmap to becoming an AI expert in 2020

Below you find a set of charts demonstrating the paths that you can take and the technologies that you would want to adopt in order to become a data scientist, machine learning or an ai expert. We made these charts for our new employees to make them AI Experts but we wanted to share them here to help the community.

I didn’t embed the roadmap images because they are too many and too vertical to fit. It sound like an interactive version is Coming Soon™️, but don’t wait on that to get started here. 2020 is almost over. 😉

Raspberry Pi raspberrypi.org

A $70 desktop Raspberry Pi in a keyboard (!)

You likely already saw this, but I don’t even care because I have to link to it because it is so freakin’ cool!

We’ve never been shy about borrowing a good idea. Which brings us to Raspberry Pi 400: it’s a faster, cooler 4GB Raspberry Pi 4, integrated into a compact keyboard. Priced at just $70 for the computer on its own, or $100 for a ready-to-go kit, if you’re looking for an affordable PC for day-to-day use this is the Raspberry Pi for you.

A $70 desktop Raspberry Pi in a keyboard (!)

Go github.com

Maddy – a composable all-in-one mail server

Maddy Mail Server implements all functionality required to run an email server. It can send messages via SMTP (works as MTA), accept messages via SMTP (works as MX) and store messages while providing access to them via IMAP. In addition to that it implements auxiliary protocols that are mandatory to keep email reasonably secure (DKIM, SPF, DMARC, DANE, MTA-STS).

It replaces Postfix, Dovecot, OpenDKIM, OpenSPF, OpenDMARC and more with one daemon with uniform configuration and minimal maintenance cost.

IMAP storage is still in beta, but this is one to watch as it could dramatically simplify your infrastructure.

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