JavaScript martinfowler.com

Micro frontends

What’s the front-end equivalent of a micro-services architecture? A micro-frontends architecture of course. This approach makes a ton of sense, though in my opinion you will definitely want to have an internal components library and some cross-frontend coordination so your UI doesn’t degrade into a series of disconnected, disjointed experiences. It’s hard to argue against the benefits stated by author Cam Jackson: Micro frontends are all about slicing up big and scary things into smaller, more manageable pieces, and then being explicit about the dependencies between them. Our technology choices, our codebases, our teams, and our release processes should all be able to operate and evolve independently of each other, without excessive coordination.

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freeCodeCamp Icon freeCodeCamp

CSS rules that will make your life easier

This is a solid set of recommendations from Nick Gard that will help you keep your CSS in order and in good shape. There’s a lot of rules that relate to accessibility, others to consistency, and some just to simple maintainability, but all are good to at least consider. After years of writing and maintaining a couple of very large web projects and numerous smaller ones, I have developed some heuristics for writing maintainable CSS. I have used BEM, SMACSS, and CSS Modules for naming, though this article is not about naming, per se. (I tend to use a mix of atomic classes and BEM-ish naming.) This article is more about the properties and values I use or avoid.

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Rollbar Icon Rollbar – Sponsored

Reduce the noise in error monitoring with Grouping Suggestions

A major problem in monitoring is dealing with noise. We don’t want to miss important signals, but sorting through all the noise can be a CHORE. A feature just released from Rollbar will help you get closer to that optimal setup faster, with less work — it’s called Grouping Suggestions. The best part is the developer experience of this new feature. If you don’t have time right now to setup grouping, you can start with the default grouping rules, manually merge errors opportunistically while in Rollbar and accept grouping suggestions as you triage errors. Integrate Rollbar for free + get $100 to donate on OpenCollective — head to rollbar.com/changelog.

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Julio Biason blog.juliobiason.net

Things I learnt the hard way (in 30 years of software development)

I just started reading this (estimated read time: 34 minutes) and I have to say there are some really great tips inside. This one on code comments is pure gold: If you have no idea how to start, describe the flow of the application in high level, pure English/your language first. Then fill the spaces between comments with the code. Better yet: think of every comment as a function, then write the function that does exactly that. Julio warns that many of his learnings are cynical, but it’s gotta be hard to not be cynical after 30 years in this industry…

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Monica Lent monicalent.com

7 absolute truths I unlearned as junior developer

This is a great set of insights about being a developer and the software industry. It’s so easy when you’re first getting into something to have unrealistic expectations or idealistic beliefs. Articles like this help pull back the curtain and show what it’s really like. Author Monica Lent describes what a junior developer can get from this post: Maybe you’ll find something here you currently believe, and get inspired to learn more about it and why the topic is so multi-faceted. Or maybe you’ll find this post encouraging because you’re already so far ahead of where I was at your stage.

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Hillel Wayne hillelwayne.com

At least one Vim trick you might not know

I’ve been using Vim for eight years and am still discovering new things. This is usually seen as a Good Thing About Vim. In my head, though, it’s a failing of discoverability: I keep discovering new things because Vim makes it so hard to know what’s available. Vim definitely has a discoverability problem, which is why posts like this one are so valuable and get shared around by people like us.

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GraphQL nilan.netlify.com

GraphQL trends in 2019

GraphQL is exploding in popularity, and I love to see it getting moved out of Facebook and becoming a clearly independent project. Neat to see all the stuff happening in the community around it. The GraphQL Foundation announcement last year was another reassurance that GraphQL is here to stay, after Facebook granted full patent rights to all GraphQL users two years ago. While the legal situation around GraphQL is in the clear now, 4 years after its open-source release, the best practices and developments surrounding the still-emerging technology are still rapidly evolving. If you like this stuff, you might also like a couple episodes of JSParty. Episode #38 is an interview with John Resig about GraphQL, while episode #72 is a panel discussion on the evolution of state management, including GraphQL.

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Changelog Icon Changelog – Sponsored

You can now support our work with the Brave browser ✊

In retrospect, becoming a Brave Publisher was a no-brainer. We’re big fans/supporters of: Independent publishers New sustainability models Brandon Eich (listen to this RFC if you haven’t yet) Real-world cryptocurrency use cases So, if you appreciate the news and podcasts we’ve been producing for the past decade, please consider browsing our site with Brave and throwing a few BAT into the proverbial tip jar. 💚

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Kevin Ball zendev.com

Top 5 skills to learn as a junior JavaScript developer

Inspired by JSParty #77, a breakdown of 5 of the top skills for junior JavaScript developers to learn. My personal favorite point is this one on the importance of looking for bigger picture patterns: One of the great things about front-end development in 2019 is that despite the abundance of frameworks, we’ve also started to see some big megatrends that are true across frameworks. This is good news for developers because it means that as you go deep in one framework you can still pick up skills that will translate to others if need be.

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Swift github.com

An example to-do list app using SwiftUI (introduced at WWDC 2019)

SwiftUI didn’t get as much air time as the new Mac Pro and its ridiculous (in multiple ways) 6K display, but looking back at Apple’s 2019 announcements, SwiftUI might end up being the most profound of them all. If you want to cut straight to some working code and an XCode project that uses the brand new UI framework, check out the linked repo.

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JavaScript arp242.net

An argument for jQuery in 2019

We all love to hop on the latest JavaScript bandwagon - and there are some amazing things you can do with modern frameworks. Modern JavaScript and DOM APIs are much improved as well, with a movement to ditch jQuery in favor of vanilla javascript. But Martin Tournoij also has a pretty good case for why jQuery might still be pretty nice, starting with: Pages like You might not need jQuery try to sell the idea that it’s easy to ditch jQuery, but the very first example is a good reason to use jQuery: one line of trivial jQuery code gets replaced with 10 lines of vanilla JS code!

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CSS Wizardry Icon CSS Wizardry

Self-host your static assets

A revealing look at the costs and risks of linking out to CDN-hosted assets for common libraries. This “best practice” may be anything but, especially with today’s ease of setting up CDNs in front of your own content with tools like Cloudflare. On the practice of linking to 3rd party CDNs, Harry doesn’t hold back: There are a number of perceived benefits to doing this, but my aim later in this article is to either debunk these claims, or show how other costs vastly outweigh them.

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Henning Jacobs github.com

Kubernetes failure/horror stories

Learn from other people’s fail stories. This is a compiled list of public Kubernetes failure stories. Why? Kubernetes is a fairly complex system with many moving parts. Its ecosystem is constantly evolving and adding even more layers (service mesh, …) to the mix. Considering this environment, we don’t hear enough real-world horror stories to learn from each other! This compilation of failure stories should make it easier for people dealing with Kubernetes operations (SRE, Ops, platform/infrastructure teams) to learn from others and reduce the unknown unknowns of running Kubernetes in production. For more information, see the blog post.

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Rich Harris DEV.to

Why Rich Harris doesn't use web components

Rich kicked the proverbial hornet’s nest yesterday. After you read his 10-point post, stick around for the comments, many of which rebut one or more of those points. I’ll weigh in on #3: Platform Fatigue Every time we add a new feature to the platform, we increase that complexity — creating new surface area for bugs, and making it less and less likely that a new competitor to Chromium could ever emerge. Co-sign! 💯

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Matt Gallagher cocoawithlove.com

First impressions of SwiftUI

Matt Gallagher: A little over a month ago, I released CwlViews and then followed up with an article suggesting that Apple might be about to release their own declarative views library. At WWDC this week, they did just that, releasing SwiftUI. This article will look at how SwiftUI’s approach to declarative views compares to CwlViews, why the two approaches differ and what Apple changed to make this possible. I’ll end with some thoughts about how this will affect macOS and iOS development.

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