DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

DigitalOcean’s Kubernetes resources and guides

All of DigitalOcean’s Kubernetes resources and guides, all in one place. Tutorials, webinars, presentations, documentation. This tweet from Kelsey Hightower says it all! Looks like @digitalocean is much closer to GKE in terms of provisioning a Kubernetes cluster in a single step and totally nails the developer experience. digitalocean.com/products/kubernetes Head to do.co/changelog to get $100 in credit to use in your first 60 days.

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Nikita Prokopov tonsky.me

How not to hire a software engineer

Nikita Prokopov writes on his personal blog about eight (8) common sense practices to use when hiring software engineers. I’m not an expert in hiring for big companies, but I have extensive experience for small ones and a bit of common sense. If you are in a business of hiring software engineers, big companies’ practices are not your friends. Common sense, fairness, tolerance, real interest, and open-mindedness are.

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Linode Icon Linode – Sponsored

Linode dedicated CPU instances

Linode just launched their newest compute instance type: Dedicated CPU Instances! Dedicated instances are optimized for workloads where consistent performance is required or where full-duty work (100% CPU all day, every day) needs doing. This includes build boxes, CI/CD, video encoding, machine learning, game servers, databases, data mining, and busy application servers. The underlying CPU resources for these instances are dedicated and shared with no one else. A Dedicated Linode’s vCPU threads are assigned exclusively to cores and SMT threads on the hypervisor, and there is no sharing or competing for these resources with other Linodes.

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CodeX editorjs.io

Editor.js — next generation block-style text editor

This new take on a block-style text editor from CodeX looks promising. Unlike how the common WYSIWYG editor produces raw HTML markup with both content data and content appearance, Editor.js outputs a JSON object with the data of each block of content. Here’s an example of how this news item would look. { "time": 1554306305, "blocks": [ { "type": "header", "data": { "text": "Editor.js — next generation block-style text editor", "level": 1 } }, { "type": "paragraph", "data": { "text": "This new take on a block-style text editor looks promising. Unlike how the common WYSIWYG editor produces raw HTML markup with both content data and content appearance, Editor.js outputs a JSON object with the data of each block of content. Here's an example of how this news item would look." } }, { "type": "code", "data": { "code": "" } } ], "version": "2.12.3" }

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Victor Zhou victorzhou.com

Why I replaced Disqus and you should too

Victor Zhou: Switching away from Disqus reduced my page weight by over 10x and my network requests by over 6x. Disqus is bloated and sells your data - there are much better alternatives out there. Disqus has been the de facto comment engine used for dev blogging (especially for SSGs) for years. I’m happy to learn there are less bloated and privacy-focused alternatives out there.

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Jon Skeet codeblog.jonskeet.uk

Storing UTC is not a silver bullet

This is a pretty long post from Jon Skeet on storing and converting UTC. For those interested in more of a tldr, the conclusion at the end of the post is “intended to be read in a standalone fashion.” When I read Stack Overflow questions involving time zones, there’s almost always someone giving the advice to only ever store UTC. Convert to UTC as soon as you can, and convert back to a target time zone as late as you can, for display purposes, and you’ll never have a time zone issue again, they say. This blog post is intended to provide a counterpoint to that advice. I’m certainly not saying storing UTC is always the wrong thing to do, but it’s not always the right thing to do either.

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Cloudflare Blog Icon Cloudflare Blog

1.1.1.1 + Warp

Cloudflare just launched a VPN for people who don’t know what V.P.N. stands for. …we think the market for VPNs as it’s been imagined to date is severely limited. Imagine trying to convince a non-technical friend that they should install an app that will slow down their Internet and drain their battery so they can be a bit more secure. Good luck. What’s interesting is the patience they’ve demonstrated with this launch. They first had to learn a thing or two about… …the failure conditions when a VPN app switched between cellular and WiFi, when it suffered signal degradation, tried to register with a captive portal, or otherwise ran into the different conditions that mobile phones experience in the field. The basic version of Warp is free. To put folks at ease (cause they’re a for-profit company), they’ve been transparent about their motives and shared “three primary ways this makes financial sense” for them.

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Awesome Lists github.com

Level up your dotfiles by reading these awesome dotfiles

On our recent text mode episode, we mentioned learning from other people’s dotfiles. Adam found this awesome-dotfiles repo and included it in the show notes, but I thought I’d log it as well to call more attention to it. Also, did you like my idea near the end of the show to produce some videos of smart/interesting developers walking us through their dotfiles? Holla back in the comments…

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Chi Wang deskgap.com

Deskgap — build cross-platform desktop apps with web technologies

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before…the difference is DeskGap leverages the operating system‘s webview instead of baking a browser in with it (like Electron). DeskGap is a framework for building cross-platform desktop apps with web technologies (JavaScript, HTML and CSS). To enable native capabilities while keeping the size down, DeskGap bundles a Node.js runtime and leaves the HTML rendering to the operating system‘s webview.

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Rod Johnson blog.atomist.com

In defense of YAML

Rod Johnson: I’m not against YAML, just against abuse of YAML. I want to help prevent people abusing YAML and being cruel to themselves and their coworkers in the process. YAML has bitten me once or twice over the years, but I am not repulsed by it as many folks seem to be. YAML’s strength is as a structured data format. Yes, it has issues. Whitespace is a minefield. Its syntax is surprisingly complex. It has gotchas: “Anyone who uses YAML long enough will eventually get burned when attempting to abbreviate Norway.” But YAML is human readable and supports comments: two key benefits that drive its popularity. If JSON supported comments it may have killed YAML by now. But alas… Rod makes a good defense of the format for certain uses.

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Dave Cheney dave.cheney.net

Practical Go — Real world advice for writing maintainable Go programs

This is Dave Cheney’s working document for his Practical Go workshop. So much wisdom shared. My goal over the next two sessions is to give you my advice for best practices writing Go code. This is a workshop style presentation, I’m going to dispense with the usual slide deck and we’ll work directly from the document which you can take away with you today. There’s also this page of the same name on his site, but I’m not sure if they’re directly connected.

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