Manuel Vila liaison.dev

Do we really need a web API?

Most of the time, web APIs are not functional requirements. They don’t add any value to the product we are building. They are just a necessary evil so the frontend can communicate with the backend. But is that really the case? Wouldn’t it be possible to get rid of these web APIs? In response to this, Manuel built Liaison, which is still in alpha, but aims to seamlessly bridge the divide between frontend and backend without having to formalize an API between the two. From reading the post, it appears to be akin to our old friend, RPC. If you are interested enough to dive into the code, he’s put together a RealWorld example which holds up quite well to the competition on a lines-of-code-to-implement basis.

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Heroku Icon Heroku – Sponsored

Six strategies for deploying to Heroku

How do you know which method is the “best” method for your team to deploy to Heroku? This post presents six of the most common ways to deploy apps to Heroku and how they might fit into your deployment strategy. There are many ways of deploying your applications to Heroku—so many, in fact, that we would like to offer some advice on which to choose. Each strategy provides different benefits based on your current deployment process, team size, and app. Choosing an optimal strategy can lead to faster deployments, increased automation, and improved developer productivity.

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Gergely Orosz blog.pragmaticengineer.com

An engineering team where everyone is a leader

If you are a leader or someone aspiring to lead, consider this approach to engineering management. This post is a summary of the approach and tools I’ve used to build an engineering team, where everyone is a leader - including sharing of the project management expectations Google Docs guide that my team uses. It’s also a reflection on the pain points that came with this approach. I can’t advocate for how universally this approach could work. However, based on my results, it is something I suggest engineering leaders - especially frontline managers - consider as an option.

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Liz Fong-Jones Increment

Code less, engineer more

The new issue of Increment is out and it’s all about team dynamics. This piece by Liz Fong-Jones is 🔥 Effective teams write less software, and writing less software enables teams to be more effective. This may sound counterintuitive at first: Aren’t we all here as engineers to write software? Isn’t our productivity measured in lines of code? To dispel this illusion, we need to stop conflating what we sometimes do with why.

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Segment Icon Segment – Sponsored

Measuring the impact of 95,000 landing pages

When you’re a cash-strapped nonprofit and you have to compete for attention against multi-billion dollar public companies, you have to get creative with growth. This is how Upsolve produced high-quality landing pages focused on topics related to their audience and then complemented those with “programmatic locality-specific landing pages” based on data from Segment’s Identities feature. Of the content we’d produced, only ~10% of our conversions were coming from our editorial articles while ~70% were coming from state and city page templates (created programmatically). Based on the data we saw in Personas, we all quickly saw where our growth was coming from and devoted the time previously set aside for editorial toward improving the quality of our programmatic content. It’s been so successful, we’ve now created over 95,000 landing pages!

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Marko Saric markosaric.com

Fighting back against Google AMP

Marko Saric shared 6 ways to fight back against Google AMP and make your sites faster than AMP without using AMP. There’s a popular thread on Hacker News with lots of people complaining about how Google AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) is ruining their mobile web experience. This week I also got two AMP links sent to me via Telegram and to see those Google URLs replacing unique domain names made me a bit sad on behalf of the owners of those sites. As a site owner myself, it feels like sovereignty of a website being taken away. Here’s how you can fight back against Google AMP…

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Cloud blog.acolyer.org

Local-first software: you own your data, in spite of the cloud

Watch out! If you start reading this paper you could be lost for hours following all the interesting links and ideas, and end up even more dissatisfied than you already are with the state of software today. You might also be inspired to help work towards a better future. I’m all in :). I co-sign that sentiment. When the author says “this paper” they are referring to this paper which they are about to summarize. If you haven’t considered local-first software before, you should know that there are seven key properties to it, which are described in detail in the paper and in brief in the summary.

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Kotlin github.com

A cross-platform markdown editor written in Kotlin Multiplatform

Press was created as a proof-of-concept for exploring Kotlin Multiplatform, as well as the author’s frustration from the lack of minimal markdown note taking apps that work on all platforms, especially Android and macOS. If you relate to either of these reasons, Press is looking for contributors. Markdown editors are the new Twitter clients.

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Opensource.com Icon Opensource.com

Why choose Xfce for your lightweight Linux desktop

The Xfce desktop has a specific, self-stated goal: to be fast on a system with low resources while being visually appealing and user-friendly. It’s been the de facto choice for lightweight Linux distributions (or remixes) for years and is often cited by its fans as a desktop that provides just enough to be useful, but never so much as to be a burden. I’ve never used Xfce myself, but I’ve heard plenty of my fellow devs sings its praises over the years.

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Bill Kennedy ardanlabs.com

The why and what of Go modules

If you’re looking for a thorough primer of Go modules, Bill Kennedy has you covered: In this post, I will focus on the transition from GOPATH to modules and the problems modules are solving. Along the way, I will provide just enough of the semantics so you can have a better understanding of how modules work at a high level. Maybe more importantly, why they work the way they do. When you’re done with this, check out part 2 of the series about projects, dependencies, and gopls.

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Databases github.com

A NewSQL relational database designed to process time-series data, faster

Our approach comes from low-latency trading; QuestDB’s stack is engineered from scratch, zero-GC Java and dependency-free. QuestDB ingests data via HTTP, PostgresSQL wire protocol, Influx line protocol or directly from Java. Reading data is done using SQL via HTTP, PostgreSQL wire protocol or via Java API. The whole database and console fit in a 3.5Mb package. According to the great knowledge base in the sky, NewSQL is, “a class of relational database management systems that seek to provide the scalability of NoSQL systems for online transaction processing workloads while maintaining the ACID guarantees of a traditional database system.”

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Manuel Vila freeCodeCamp

How to simplify full-stack development with a unified architecture

Manuel Vila, writing for freeCodeCamp: In this article, I introduce the concept of “unified architecture” that dramatically simplifies the development of full-stack applications. Indeed, this architecture unifies the six physical layers (data access, backend model, API server, API client, frontend model, and user interface) usually seen in “well-designed” applications into one single logical layer. It is like going from a 3D world to a 2D world. Everything gets a lot easier. That “unified architecture” manifests itself as Liaison, which we linked to last week and it caused some… controversy discussion. In this article, Manuel explains why Liaison is different than similar RPC things that came before it. Interesting stuff, to say the least.

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Awesome Lists wisdom.engineering

Unicode is awesome!

Prior to Unicode, international communication was grueling- everyone had defined their separate extended character set in the upperhalf of ASCII (called Code Pages) that would conflict- Just think, German speakers coordinating with Korean speakers over which 127 character Code Page to use. Thankfully the Unicode standard caught on and unified communication. What follows is an awesome list of Unicode “tidbits, packages, and resources”. And of course there’s a sub-section on everyone’s favorite: emojis

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