Chris Coyier CSS-Tricks

Images are hard.

I believe Chris Coyier put that period at the end of this post title for a reason:

Putting images on websites is incredibly simple, yes? Actually, yes, it is. You use <img> and link it to a valid source in the src attribute and you’re done. Except that there are (counts fingers) 927 things you could (and some you really should) do that often go overlooked. Let’s see…

He goes on to list 15 bullet points of things to consider. This images situation is actually a microcosm of the web (and all software?) itself: it appears easy/simple at first, but the deeper you go, the more dizzying the depth.

Windows win11.blueedge.me

Windows 11 in React

This open source project is made in the hope to replicate the Windows 11 desktop experience on web, using standard web technologies like React, CSS (SCSS), and JS.

The project description says “in React”, but the source code is comprised of 93.5% CSS. I love this portion of the README that addresses why the author built it (I assume they get this question a lot).

WHY NOT? Why not just waste a week of your life creating a react project just to coverup your insecurities of how incompetent you are. Just Why not!

Windows 11 in React

RudderStack Icon RudderStack – Sponsored

Reinventing the on-prem deployment model

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There’s a new architecture and deployment paradigm that is gaining momentum and addresses the issues we have today by merging the best from both worlds, on-prem and SaaS.

The SaaS software delivery model has completely transformed the industry and for a good reason. It offers an amazing combination of easiness and maintainability that wasn’t possible in the past with older software delivery models. It works amazingly well when we want to deliver software like CRMs, Marketing platforms, etc.

Regardless of its success, there are still challenges with the adoption of SaaS, especially in the enterprise market where security and compliance are of great importance. Today, with the rapid growth of data-related products, the SaaS model is getting even more challenged while compliance and security are not just an enterprise concern anymore.

This post shares in more detail why we need a new paradigm and what this new model has to offer.

Career revenuecat.com

The case for location-independent salaries

Miguel Carranza from RevenueCat lays out why he and his co-founder decided to provide equal compensation for the same role regardless of location. Here’s the bullet points of their reasoning:

  • The quality of the work is equivalent
  • Immigration can be a challenge
  • Keeping up with the competition
  • It’s simpler
  • It’s part of our company mission

Read his post for the details along with some downsides of this approach.

Productivity github.com

A Unix-style personal search engine and web crawler for your digital footprint

Apollo is a different type of search engine. Traditional search engines (like Google) are great for discovery when you’re trying to find the answer to a question, but you don’t know what you’re looking for.

However, they’re very poor at recall and synthesis when you’ve seen something before on the internet somewhere but can’t remember where. Trying to find it becomes a nightmare - how can you synthezize the great material on the internet when you forgot where it even was? I’ve wasted many an hour combing through Google and my search history to look up a good article, blog post, or just something I’ve seen before.

If you scan Apollo’s README, you’ll know the author has put a lot of thought into this project. The more I grokked it, the more I thought of Monocle (which we’re doing an episode about soon). Turns out, it’s a direct inspiration (along with Serenity OS for the design).

David Sacks sacks.substack.com

Building out your SaaS org

David Sacks shared frameworks for Series A, B, and C stage SaaS startup orgs, saying they can be “helpful as a starting point.”

You’re the founder of a nicely growing SaaS startup which has just raised a Series A, Series B, or Series C funding round. You need to hire rapidly to seize the opportunity. But how much should you hire, what roles should you hire, and what should the org chart look like when you’re done?

Retool Icon Retool – Sponsored

What is low code? A comprehensive guide

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Low code and no code have all the hype, but among developers, they also have equal amounts of skepticism.

In March 2021, no code pioneer Zapier acquired no-code community Makerpad. In April 2021, UiPath, a provider of low code automation software, IPO’d at $31 billion. Gartner predicts that by 2024, more than 65% of application development activity will come from low code application development platforms.

Software is eating the world, but low code and no code are making developers rethink how software is made.

Databases github.com

toyDB – a distributed SQL db written in Rust

This is not a use-it-in-the-real-world kinda thing. It’s being written as a learning project, but may interest you if you want to learn about database internals. It includes:

  • Raft-based distributed consensus engine for linearizable state machine replication.
  • ACID-compliant transaction engine with MVCC-based snapshot isolation.
  • Pluggable storage engine with B+tree and log-structured backends.
  • Iterator-based query engine with heuristic optimization and time-travel support.
  • SQL interface including projections, filters, joins, aggregates, and transactions.

Martin Heinz martinheinz.dev

The unknown features of Python's `operator` module

At the first glance Python’s operator module might not seem very interesting. It includes many operator functions for arithmetic and binary operations and a couple of convenience and helper functions. They might not seem so useful, but with help of just a few of these functions you can make your code faster, more concise, more readable and more functional. So, in this article we will explore this great Python module and make the most out of the every function included in it.

Alex Koutmos akoutmos.com

The human side of Elixir

Alex Koutmos:

If you follow my blog, you have probably noticed that my articles usually revolve around some deep technical problems and how to go about solving these problems using the amazing Elixir programming language. These posts usually discuss the technical merits surrounding Elixir and the Erlang virtual machine, but rarely touch on the “human” aspects of Elixir.

The goal of today’s post will be to address some of the non-technical aspects of the Elixir programming language and talk about the profound impact they can have on your engineers and your business. I’ll start off by addressing one of the most common concerns I come across when it comes to Elixir - that being that “It is hard to find Elixir developers”.

An excellent goal for a blog post. I’d love to see more like this for each and every sub-community in the software world.

Brad Van Vugt blog.battlesnake.com

Controlling a battlesnake with a webcam, Replit, and your face

Battlesnake’s Brad Van Vugt:

This past spring on Coding Badly, Joe and I, for whatever reason, challenged ourselves to build a camera-controlled Battlesnake. The result was “Facesnake” – a Battlesnake controlled in real-time using your face and webcam. This post outlines how we built it using Replit and tracking.js :-)

You can also jump straight to the source code or watch Facesnake in action here.

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