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Command line interface

A CLI, or command-line interface, is a console that helps users issue commands to a program.
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link Icon theptrk.com

Creating a simple 'did.txt' file

This post is a simple, step-by-step explanation of how Patrick created 'an insanely simple “did” file accessible by terminal'. What's interesting about it to me is not how to do it, but the idea of doing it itself. His motiviation: Time flies by when you’re learning how to code. Its super important to take a second every once in a while to simple write down what you did during the past mental sprint. Writing down what you learned solidifies the knowledge. This is a great truth, and one that applies far beyond learning how to code. Sometimes we need a did.txt just to recognize how much we've accomplished recently. For me, there are days when I get to the end and feel like I didn't really accomplish much. If I'd catalogued my wins throughout the day as they occurred (no matter how small), I bet I'd feel different about that. However, I'm both busy and lazy (a hellacious pairing) and wouldn't keep up with this habit unless it were dead simple. Patrick's 'did.txt' solution is about as simple as it gets...

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Bash github.com

A command-line system information tool written in bash 3.2+

The overall purpose of Neofetch is to be used in screen-shots of your system. Neofetch shows the information other people want to see. There are other tools available for proper system statistic/diagnostics. Supports almost 150 different operating systems, so odds are it has you covered. Check my results below. Pretty decent uptime for a laptop, no?

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Data visualization github.com

Hacker job trends 📈

As we know, an "Ask HN: Who is Hiring?"(example) post will occur at hackernews every month. It is interesting to scan the post because it helps you to get a feeling about what is happening in tec related busness. Aim of this repo is to give you a feeling about how the tec job requirements/used tools/kind/... evolves. React and Blockchain jobs on the rise...

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Diego ZoracKy github.com

MagiCLI can generate a command line interface for any module

MagiCLI was built to expand the use of npm modules. When all modules can be executed via CLI, npm becomes a source for anyone who wants to find a solution ti be run from a terminal and also for those who would like to call an existing solution written in Node.js from a program written in another language. For even more context, check out the intro post on Hacker Noon.

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Steven Loria github.com

Making the Node.js REPL more productive

Project-specific REPLs for Node.js I'm a bit surprised this functionality isn't in the box, nonetheless: local-repl saves you from typing out imports every time you open a new Node.js REPL. You specify the modules and objects that you want to automatically import in either package.json or .replrc.js. It also lets you use await in the REPL without wrapping your code in async functions. That sounds quite nice.

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Zach Leatherman github.com

imaging-heap

Responsive images are essential to any image-heavy website with an eye on performance. Due to the large variety of viewport sizes and device pixel ratios, they are also very time-intensive to test. Luckily, the heroes over at Filament Group have built a tool to help make the testing process easier. A command line tool to measure the efficiency of your responsive image markup across viewport sizes and device pixel ratios. I assume the project name is a nod to weirdo musician and tech experimenter Imogen Heap.

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Ken Nilsen github.com

Show MDN browser compatibility data on the command line

mdncomp shows MDN browser compatibility data and documentation in an instance right on the command line to see if a feature is supported or not in target browsers. It can list an excerpt from MDN documentation, provide a link, and optionally go directly to that page, if needed. Bonus — try mdncomp --random --doc . to explore APIs and features you've never heard about.

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Manuel Vila freeCodeCamp

Let’s fix the good old command line

Manuel Vila: We are using more and more command-line tools, and while many of them are really good, I think they could be even better if they were based on more modern foundations. Because our tools are based on ancient paradigms (*nix, Bash, etc.), it's difficult for them to be both customizable and easy to use. After working for a year trying to solve this problem, he came up with "resources", which he says: brings an object-oriented interface to the command-line tools, making them a lot more flexible, composable, and user-friendly. The curmudgeon in me immediately thought, "old dog ... new tricks", but Manuel has a reply ready: I am well aware that I am not going to change 50 years of old practices by myself. It has to be a collective effort. So I'm trying to communicate as much as I can to find the few people crazy enough to join the adventure. Are you "crazy enough" to go on the adventure with him? Click through to find out more.

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