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Gaming

Names like Nintendo, SEGA, Playstation, and Steam warm the heart (and inspire the keys) of hackers all around the world.
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Gaming script-8.github.io

A fantasy computer for making, sharing, and playing tiny retro-looking games

SCRIPT-8 is designed to encourage play — the kind of wonder-filled play children experience as they explore and learn about the world. In order to support this goal, everything in SCRIPT-8 has immediate feedback. It is what some call a “livecoding” environment. Send this to $YOUNG_PERSON in your life. But also bcc it to yourself. 😉

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Gaming github.com

Enjoy creating games like it's 1997? Try this retro gaming engine

The engine is a fork of the Quake II codebase that focuses on serving as a base for standalone games. Unlike other ports, it does not aim at being compatible with mods or the base Quake II game. In fact, many features were removed to reduce the complexity of the codebase and make the process of creating new games on top of the engine easier and faster.

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NVIDIA Developer Blog Icon NVIDIA Developer Blog

NVIDIA's PhysX project goes open source and beyond gaming

PhysX is NVIDIA’s hardware-accelerated physics simulation engine that’s now released as open source to move it beyond its most common use case in the gaming world, to give access to the embedded and scientific fields — think AI, robotics, computer vision, and self-driving cars. PhysX SDK has gone open source, starting today with version 3.4! It is available under the simple 3-Clause BSD license. With access to the source code, developers can debug, customize and extend the PhysX SDK as they see fit.

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iOS github.com

A book on getting to the #1 spot in the App Store

If this book intrigues you (like it does me), start nowhere else but the “How to Read This Book”: A successful iOS game makes $4,000 annually (this goes for any app frankly). A successful Android game makes one seventh of that (one third at best). You are not a large multi-million dollar company (at least I don’t think you are given that you’re reading this book). So you don’t have the customer acquisition/marketing budget to beat this $4,000 annual average. Period. Brutal. What’s a dev to do, then? Make lots of niche, high quality games.

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Vim github.com

Play PacVim to learn Vim

Jamal Moon writes in the readme: Vim is a great tool to write and edit code, but many people, including me, struggled with the steep learning curve. I did not find a fun, free way to learn about the vim commands in-depth, and thus, PacVim was born. Inspired by the classic, PacMan, PacVim is a game that’ll give anyone plenty of practice with the vim commands while being a ton of fun to play. Download and build the game with macOS and Linux.

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Matías Olivera warrior.js.org

WarriorJS – an exciting game of programming and Artificial Intelligence

A JavaScript game you play from the terminal: In WarriorJS, you wear the skin of a warrior climbing a tall tower to reach The JavaScript Sword at the top level. Legend has it that the sword bearer becomes enlightened in the JavaScript language, but be warned: the journey will not be easy. On each floor, you need to write JavaScript to instruct the warrior to battle enemies, rescue captives, and reach the stairs alive… Whether are new to programming or a JS guru, WarriorJS will put your skills to the test. Will you dare? Check out the gameplay docs to get a feel for things. This could be a lot of fun!

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The Verge Icon The Verge

Hackers have turned the Nintendo Switch into a functional Linux tablet

Paul Miller: There are two major reasons I can think of to hack a game console. The first one is obvious: so you can play cracked copies of games. That’s why modern consoles are so difficult to hack, because millions of dollars are on the line. But some people just want to run any software they choose on the hardware they own. And for those people, Linux on the Switch is a huge achievement. This hack boasts touchscreen support, a fully operational death star web browser, and a GPU-powered demo app. Sadly, there are no details out on how you can do it yourself, but Twitter user fail0verlow has a nice video of it in action embedded in a tweet.

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