Rust Medium (via Scribe)

Using Rust at a startup: a cautionary tale

Matt Welsh:

I hesitated writing this post, because I don’t want to start, or get into, a holy war over programming languages. (Just to get the flame bait out of the way, Visual Basic is the best language ever!) But I’ve had a number of people ask me about my experience with Rust and whether they should pick up Rust for their projects. So, I’d like to share some of the pros and cons that I see of using Rust in a startup setting, where moving fast and scaling teams is really important.

The learning curve and hiring difficulties seem to be the major culprits, in Matt’s experience.

Gustav Westling westling.dev

Introducing the extremely linear git history

An interesting idea from Gustav Westling…

One of the things that I like to do in my projects, is to make the git history as linear as possible.

Usually this means to rebase commits onto the main branch, but it can also mean to only allow merges in one direction, from feature branches into main, never the other way around. It kind of depends on the project.

Today I’m taking this one step further, and I’m introducing a new concept: extremely linear git history.

With our extremely linear history, the first commit in a repo hash a hash that starts with 0000000, the second commit is 0000001, the third is 0000002, and so on!

How he accomplishes this is perhaps even more interesting (and hacky!)

Introducing the extremely linear git history

Ruby blog.saeloun.com

Ruby adds a new core Data class to represent immutable value objects

Ruby 3.1 adds a new core class called Data to represent simple immutable value objects. The Data class helps define simple classes for value-alike objects that can be extended with custom methods.

While the Data class is not meant to be used directly, it can be used as a base class for creating custom value objects. The Data class is similar to Struct, but the key difference being that it is immutable.

In its heyday, most Rubyists wouldn’t touch immutability with a ten-foot pole. Times, they are a changin’…

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