Awesome Lists github.com

An awesome list of internet services that don't require logins or registrations

A curated list of awesome internet services that normally you would have to register for, but due to clever approaches on the part of the service you can use without registering, creating an account and filling endless forms.

Sometimes you just want want some help getting stuff done, but you don’t want to sign up for yet another web service. These sites/services have all figured out how to help you get that done.

Git blog.waleedkhan.name

Lightning-fast rebases with `git move`

How much faster is it? See Timing. If the branch is currently checked out, then 10x is a reasonable estimate. If the branch is not checked out, then it’s even faster.

Is performance the only added feature? git move also offers several other quality-of-life improvements over git rebase. For example, it can move entire subtrees, not just branches. See the git move documentation for more information.

git move is part of the git-branchless suite. Cool stuff.

Retool Icon Retool – Sponsored

The state of internal tools in 2021

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Developers spend more than 30% of their time building internal applications. That number jumps to 45% for companies with 5000+ employees. And on top of that, 4 out of 5 teams plan to keep or increase this level of investment over the next 12 months.

Why are internal tools and apps so important? And why do developers spend so much time on them? We surveyed 650 developers and builders (see full PDF report here) and they had one clear goal in mind: making teams across the business more productive.

Try Retool today

Shawn Wang swyx.io

AWS is playing Chess. Cloudflare is playing Go

Shawn (swyx) Wang lays out Cloudflare’s strategy to disrupt the cloud from the outside in:

While the tech industry is used to come-from-below disruption, and the software industry is increasingly grasping class-for-the-masses atomic concepts, I believe Cloudflare is writing a new playbook that is the little-guy counterpart of the embrace, extend, extinguish model used by Microsoft.

Zach Leatherman zachleat.com

Who pays for web frameworks?

Zach Leatherman has been considering sustainability models for Eleventy, so he surveyed the field to see what everyone else in the web framework ecosystem are doing. Check out his post for the raw data and his analysis. Here’s where he stands as of today:

I don’t have the answers. I definitely wouldn’t agree that Eleventy has figured out our sustainable monetization strategy but I do really admire the success that Vue has had solving this exact problem. I do know that I have no interest in Trend 2 (raise investment money) but I’ll continue to keep a keen eye on what other indie-framework folks are doing.

Ops nomadproject.io

Nomad vs. Kubernetes

This page is built by the Nomad folks, so keep that in mind when reading through the comparison;

Kubernetes is an orchestration system for containers originally designed by Google, now governed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and developed by Google, Red Hat, and many others. Kubernetes and Nomad support similar core use cases for application deployment and management, but they differ in a few key ways. Kubernetes aims to provide all the features needed to run Linux container-based applications including cluster management, scheduling, service discovery, monitoring, secrets management and more. Nomad only aims to focus on cluster management and scheduling and is designed with the Unix philosophy of having a small scope while composing with tools like Consul for service discovery/service mesh and Vault for secret management.

I’m just excited to see strong competition in this space, and had never heard of Nomad prior to today. If you’ve used it and have experience/opinions, I’d love to hear ’em!

Drew DeVault drewdevault.com

Software developers have stopped caring about reliability

Of all the principles of software engineering which has fallen by the wayside in the modern “move fast and break things” mentality of assholes modern software developers, reliability is perhaps the most neglected, along with its cousin, robustness. Almost all software that users encounter in $CURRENTYEAR is straight-up broken, and often badly.

A scathing rant by Drew DeVault, but it comes with sage advice on how we move forward from here:

You must prioritize simplicity. You and I are not smart enough to be clever, so don’t try. As the old saying goes, there are two kinds of programs: those simple enough to obviously have no bugs, and those complicated enough to have no obvious bugs. It is by no means easier to make the simpler kind, in fact, it’s much more difficult. However, the simpler the system is, the easier it is to reason about all of its states and edge cases. You do not need a JavaScript-powered custom textbox widget. YOU DO NOT NEED A JAVASCRIPT-POWERED CUSTOM TEXTBOX WIDGET.

Honeycomb Icon Honeycomb – Sponsored

Observability 5-year retrospective

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O’Reilly said it best this year when they summarized learning trends in 2021:

Observability saw the greatest growth in the past year (128%), while monitoring is only up 9%. While observability is a richer, more powerful capability than monitoring — observability is the ability to find the information you need to analyze or debug software, while monitoring requires predicting in advance what data will be useful — we suspect that this shift is largely cosmetic. “Observability” risks becoming the new name for monitoring. And that’s unfortunate. If you think observability is merely a more fashionable term for monitoring, you’re missing its value.

We can’t lose sight of that value. We can’t afford to. This isn’t just a tale of vendors arguing to define marketing terms for their own benefit. The pain and suffering that people endure every day because they can’t understand their own damn systems is too real. The long hours, the toil, the greasy hacks moldering away into technical debt, the late nights, the missed sleep, the burnout. The pain is real, and the solutions are specific. We need specific, meaningful technical terms to help users navigate the future and find their way to those solutions.

Terminal arp242.net

s/bash/zsh/g

Martin Tournoij lays out a bunch of ways he finds zsh more compelling than bash.

There are many more things. I’m not going to list them all here. None of this is new; much (if not all?) of this has around for 20 years, if not longer. I don’t know why bash is the de-facto default, or why people spend time on complex solutions to work around bash problems when zsh solves them. I guess because Linux used a lot of GNU stuff and bash was came with it, and GNU stuff was (and is) using bash. Not a very good reason, certainly not one 30 years later.

Security whitehoodhacker.net

IoT hacking and rickrolling my high school district

On April 30th, 2021, I rickrolled my high school district. Not just my school but the entirety of Township High School District 214. It’s the second-largest high school district in Illinois, consisting of 6 different schools with over 11,000 enrolled students.

Who doesn’t like a good rickroll story? This one’s replete with screencaps and video footage

Python lukasz.langa.pl

Where does all the effort go? Looking at Python core developer activity

Łukasz Langa was tasked by the PSF to look at the state of CPython as an active software development project.

What are people working on? Which standard libraries require most work? Who are the active experts behind which libraries? Those were just some of the questions asked by the Foundation. In this post I’m looking into our Git repository history and our Github PR data to find answers.

Follow along as Łukasz explains how they gathered the data, analyzed it, and got answers to the questions above.

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