Go github.com

A highly customizable and lightweight framework for crafting Go CLIs

Nice is a highly customizable and lightweight framework for crafting CLI apps.

Nice respects idiomatic Go code and focuses to be clear, efficient and easy to write and maintain.

You can use it as a full-featured non-opinionated framework or use any nice packages as stand-alone libraries.

I’m a big fan of the similar projects section in the README. Classy!

A highly customizable and lightweight framework for crafting Go CLIs

Craig Kerstiens blog.crunchydata.com

Postgres 14: it's the little things

Craig Kerstiens on the little wins coming in Postgres 14, which is scheduled for the end of September:

Postgres is, and for some time will continue to be, the first database I turn to. As Postgres focuses on the little things, it just deepens my commitment to it. Why look elsewhere when the bond just grows over time? So today I wanted to call some extra attention to those little things, the ones that don’t get the spotlight, but simply make a developer’s life better.

He goes on to highlight the JSON syntax improvements, read-only roles, what’s new in psql, and more.

Square Icon Square – Sponsored

Develop on the platform sellers trust

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Launch fast with Square’s developer tools! Using Square’s developer platform means less maintenance of legacy systems and more focus on core customer and product experiences.

  • Full sandbox environment
  • Interactive API explorer
  • Live event monitoring
  • Backend SDKs: PHP, Ruby, Java, .Net, Python, Node
  • Secure payment SDKs: iOS, Android, React Native, Flutter

Aftab Alam aalam.in

Get up & running with Astro

This is part 1 of a 5-part series on learning Astro, a new-kid-on-the-block static site builder that’s capturing the hearts of web developers due to its Bring Your Own Framework (BYOF) approach and Zero Emitted JS (ZEJS?) by default.

Throughout this series, I’ll walk you, step-by-step, through building an Astro-based blog(codenamed: Astro-Ink). You’ll discover more of Astro, its benefits, and super-interesting constructs and patterns that Astro brings to the table.

Smashing Magazine Icon Smashing Magazine

How to build your own mouseless development environment

I’ve never gone full mouseless (nor do I necessarily recommend it), but there’s extreme productivity wins to be mined by keeping your hands on the home row as much as possible.

Building a development environment with the shell as a keystone offers multiple benefits. You can use tools that fit nicely with each other, you can customize everything depending on your own needs, and the biggest of all, you can control your entire development environment with your keyboard. This can save a lot of cognitive energy as well as deliver a pleasant user experience.

This is an excellent walk-through on Smashing Mag for those ready to level up their terminal game:

Today, I’d like to share with you these tools so that you too can increase your efficiency and your comfort in your daily job. They work well together — shaping what I call my Mouseless Development Environment. More precisely, we’ll discuss:

  • Why using the Linux shell can be very powerful when working with plain text (including code);
  • Why using the dreaded Arch Linux;
  • The advantage of a tiling window manager;
  • How to have a great terminal experience with URxvt, tmux, and tmuxp;
  • Why Vim can become your best friend.

Shekhar Gulati shekhargulati.com

My software estimation process

In this post, I cover in a step by step manner how to do software estimation for project bids where there is limited clarity and a lot of ambiguity. I cover how we can use an uncertainty factor to cover the unknowns, questions/things to ask/consider at each step of the software estimation process, and some practical advice. This process is based on estimates I have done for multiple projects in the last couple of years.

Trisha Gee trishagee.com

Reading code is a skill

Trisha Gee writes (because Someone Is Wrong On The Internet):

The problem is not that we shouldn’t write readable code. Of course we should aim to write readable code, if only for our own poor selves further down the line (there is no one less capable of reading my code the following week than me). The problem is that these two issues are not mutually exclusive. It’s not “write readable code” or “learn to read code”. That’s like saying, “I’m going to drive really economically so I don’t need to put petrol in the car”. No. You’re still going to need to put fuel in the car (if it’s not electric!) at some point no matter how economically you drive.

She writes a lot more than just that (of course) and even gave a talk about it, which is also worth digesting.

RudderStack Icon RudderStack – Sponsored

The future of Data Engineering

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Soumyadeb Mitra (CEO of RudderStack) shares his thoughts on the future of data engineering.

As the data engineering megatrend impacts companies across industries, what will the big changes be in the field of data and for the role of data engineer specifically?

There will certainly be changes in data engineering “on the ground,” but one trend that will shape organizations in a significant way over the next 10 years will be the increasing value and responsibility of data executives.

Kubernetes github.com

Datree is a CLI to ensure K8s manifests and Helm charts follow best practices

Datree is a CLI tool that supports Kubernetes admins in their roles, by preventing developers from making errors in Kubernetes configurations that can cause clusters to fail in production. Our CLI tool is open source, enabling it to be supported by the Kubernetes community.

It’s far more effective than manual processes, such as sending an email to a slew of developers, begging them to set various limits, which likely falls on deaf ears because developers are already overwhelmed.

In addition the CIL, Datree provides a web app interface which you can see in action right here.

Practices eugeneyan.com

The first rule of X: start without X

Eugene Yan, in a post titled The first rule of machine learning: start without machine learning:

Applying machine learning effectively is tricky. You need data. You need a robust pipeline to support your data flows. And most of all, you need high-quality labels. As a result, most of the time, my first iteration doesn’t involve machine learning at all.

Eugene is stating the obvious with this post, but hey sometimes you just gotta state it. What’s even more interesting to me is how nicely the format generalizes! Let’s pattern match this sucker:

The first rule of X: start without X

Now, apply the pattern a few times and see if it holds:

  1. The first rule of Kubernetes: start without Kubernetes
  2. The first rule of goroutines: start without goroutines
  3. The first rule of coding: start without coding

Yeah, that abstraction holds pretty true. Surely there will be cases where it falls flat on its face, though. Can you think of any examples?

Will McGugan github.com

Free code reviews for open source Python projects

Will McGugan is a full-stack developer and Python expert who is offering up free reviews for any/all qualifying open source projects.What a great idea/service to the community!

The reviews will focus on API design and general architection of your project with a view to making them a) more maintainable b) future proof and c) user friendly, but will avoid anything that a linter could do for you. Reviews are intended to be constructive and hopefully give advice you can act on, but are in no way a “grade”.

I won’t need to run your code to do a review and reviews aren’t intended to fix bugs.

All reviews will be public and will be published in the repo in a markdown file. An exception would be for any security issues, where I would notify you first.

Not everyone all at once, now. There’s already quite a few requests in the queue.

Six Colors Icon Six Colors

Safari Keyword Search hits 2.0, comes to iOS

Dan Moren writing for Six Colors:

Safari Keyword Search is a little tool that allows you to define shortcuts for searching specific sites. For example, you could type “imdb George Clooney” to be taken directly to the IMDb search results for George Clooney, or “w iPhone 13” to go straight to the Wikipedia page for the iPhone 13. You can also define your own shortcuts, so, for example, I’ve defined “sc” as a Google search limited to sixcolors.com, which helps me quickly turn up articles here…

On iOS 15, Mobile Safari supports web extensions. That means this free and awesome tool is now available on the go, where it shortcuts are even more useful.

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