Electron minbrowser.github.io

Min – a smarter, faster web browser

I love how people continue to experiment in browserland. Min has some cool stuff going: Tabs in Min take up less space, giving you more room to browse the web. Pages you haven’t looked at in a while fade out, letting you see what’s important, and Focus Mode hides your other tabs to prevent you from getting distracted. It also sports built-in ad blocking (table stakes for new browsers to compete?) and DDG integration in the search bar. Min is built on Electron, so while it may be fast it possibly isn’t memory efficient. But what browser is, these days? It’s also worth noting that Min runs on an older version of Chromium, so it’s likely missing some security fixes. (More on that right here.)

read more...

Andrey Sitnik DEV.to

How a month without computers changed me

Andrey Sitnik: No emails left for me to read. Nor write. I’ve sent a message to my family and delegated my open source projects (Autoprefixer and PostCSS) to my friends. With my last tweet sent, I turn off my laptop, phone, and tablet. My Digital Sabbath begins in 10 minutes: no digital devices for the next month. An absolutely fascinating read. You can visualize Andrey’s digital sabbath on his GitHub contribution graph 👇

read more...

Rollbar Icon Rollbar – Sponsored

Errors from the world's top 100 websites (and how to avoid them)

Jennifer Marsh writes on the Rollbar blog: When you think of the top 100 sites in the world, you think of high-traffic domains and pages coded to perfection. In fact, even the most popular sites in the world have errors hidden behind the scenes that are still visible in your browser’s developer tools … We found that most of the top 100 sites had several errors which could be easily monitored and prevented. In this post Jennifer shows you the most common errors faced by the top websites in the world and how you can avoid them.

read more...
logged by @logbot permalink

ZEIT Icon ZEIT

Now 2.0

My biggest take away from this epic announcement from ZEIT? The support of the majestic monorepo! …Now 2.0 enables what we will call The Majestic Monorepo, inspired by a similarly named essay by DHH, creator of Ruby on Rails (The Majestic Monolith). We don’t agree that you should be orchestrating a big server abstraction (a monolith), but we believe you should be able to collocate your APIs and your business logic in a single place, with a cohesive deployment story. It looks, feels and deploys like a monolith, with none of its downsides. …but there is SO MUCH MORE to this announcement. Also, we talked a bit about David’s idea of The Majestic Monolith on The Changelog #286.

read more...

Eugen Kiss blog.usejournal.com

Lean testing or why unit tests are worse than you think

This is a spectacularly thoughtful and insightful piece by Eugen Kiss on testing: Different kinds of tests have different costs and benefits. You have finite resources to distribute into testing. You want to get the most out of your tests, so use the most economic testing approach. He goes on to describe why he believes that integration tests provide better ROI than unit tests and end-to-end tests. Then he turns his aim on unit tests in particular: There is the claim that making your code unit-testable will improve its quality. Many arguments and some empirical evidence in favor of that claim exist so I will put light on the other side… Unit tests ossify the internal structure of the code. Click through to read his whole argument, but I will say in my experience unit tests only ossify the structure when I do them poorly. In other words, the better I get at unit testing, the more useful they become. In light of that, Eugen’s big takeaway at the end might be 💯 on point: If you desire clear, albeit unnuanced, instructions, here is what you should do: Use a typed language. Focus on integration and end-to-end tests. Use unit tests only where they make sense (e.g. pure algorithmic code with complex corner cases). Be economic. Be lean.

read more...

Daniel Stenberg daniel.haxx.se

QUIC will officially become HTTP/3

We recently talked with Daniel Stenberg about HTTP/2 and QUIC, so this news comes with little surprise looking back on that conversation with hindsight. The protocol that’s been called HTTP-over-QUIC for quite some time has now changed name and will officially become HTTP/3. This was triggered by this original suggestion by Mark Nottingham. On November 7, 2018 Dmitri of Litespeed announced that they and Facebook had successfully done the first interop ever between two HTTP/3 implementations. Mike Bihop’s follow-up presentation in the HTTPbis session on the topic can be seen here. The consensus in the end of that meeting said the new name is HTTP/3!

read more...

Hired Icon Hired – Sponsored

Let top tech companies apply to you? Yes please!

Hired works with over 10,000 companies — from high growth startups to multi-national enterprise corporations to place top technical talent. They have 25,000+ job openings across disciplines in Software Engineering, DevOps, Machine Learning, Data Science and Engineering Management. How does it work? It’s easy, just create a free profile at hired.com/changelognews and sit back and relax. You control the interview process. You choose what interviews to accept. You select the job that’s right for you.

read more...
logged by @logbot permalink

Zach Bloom Cloudflare Blog

Cloud computing without containers

(READ ALONG IN YOUR FAVORITE MOVIE TRAILER VOICE) … In a world where serverless is still being demystified, CloudFlare, a company who’s focused on pushing things to the edge, launches a game changer for not only serverless, but for cloud computing at large. Unlike every other cloud computing platforms out there, this platform called Workers, doesn’t use containers or virtual machines. This, is the future of serverless and cloud computing. Join Zach Bloom in this epic tale as he tries to convince you why. OK, seriously — this news bubbled up to me enough times that I just had to share it. Here’s the tee up of the problem they faced — how they’re going about solving it is truly a great read. Two years ago we had a problem. We were limited in how many features and options we could build in-house, we needed a way for customers to be able to build for themselves. We set out to find a way to let people write code on our servers deployed around the world (we had a little over a hundred data centers then, 155 as of this writing). Our system needed to run untrusted code securely, with low overhead. We sit in front of ten million sites and process millions and millions of requests per second, it also had to run very very quickly…

read more...

Leo Farias github.com

NearDB - a simple document db made for globally distributed reads

The motivation behind NearDB: While working on building edge applications for higher performance and lower latency there is a need store persistent data also on edge. There are multiple distributed database solutions but they are very involved and costly while having a much lower global footprint than a CDN. The idea came up to leverage ubiquitous and mature infrastructure like cloud storage and CDNs to deliver a persistent data solution from the edge.

read more...

Claudio github.com

Pampy – pattern matching for Python

Pampy is pretty small (150 lines), reasonably fast, and often makes your code more readable, and easier to reason about. Pattern matching is the feature in Elixir that I miss when using other languages, so it’s awesome to see it brought to Python. Here’s an example of Pampy in action as a Lisp calculator (from the readme): from pampy import match, REST, _ def lisp(exp): return match(exp, int, lambda x: x, callable, lambda x: x, (callable, REST), lambda f, rest: f(*map(lisp, rest)), tuple, lambda t: list(map(lisp, t)), ) plus = lambda a, b: a + b minus = lambda a, b: a - b from functools import reduce lisp((plus, 1, 2)) # => 3 lisp((plus, 1, (minus, 4, 2))) # => 3 lisp((reduce, plus, (range, 10))) # => 45

read more...

Andy Clarke stuffandnonsense.co.uk

Redesigning your product and website for dark mode

Andy Clarke on the Stuff & Nonsense blog: Implementing dark mode is easy, but designing for it is less so. Here are some things you should consider when designing a dark mode version of your product or website to ensure you maintain accessibility and readability, and a consistent feel for your brand between Light and Dark. It’s all the rage to “dark mode all the things” right now, but Andy’s practical advice on the topic is great. Finding the right palette and the consequential typography decisions needed, are good to keep in mind.

read more...

 Itamar Turner-Trauring codewithoutrules.com

Enthusiasts vs. Pragmatists

Do you love programming for its own sake, or do you just program for the outcomes it enables? Depending on which describes you best you will face different problems in your career as a software developer. Enthusiasts code out of love. If you’re an enthusiast you’d write software just for fun, but one day you discovered your hobby could also be your career, and now you get paid to do what you love. Pragmatists may enjoy coding, but they do it for the outcomes. If you’re a pragmatist, you write software because it’s a good career, or for what it enables you to do and build. Which is your camp and why?

read more...

James Governor redmonk.com

"GitHub is where source code lives."

I agree — “GitHub is, quite simply, home for developers,” as stated by James Governor in his highlights post on GitHub Universe 2018. Out the gate, James focuses on the announcement of GitHub Actions, which “feels like a profound launch, one that could prove extremely disruptive in the long term.” An idea that seems to have started as “Probot” is now a full fledged and more approachable product offering called GitHub Actions, and looks like it will continue to drive more and developers, developers, developers to GitHub in 2019. Quite simply, Actions could be a disruption driving feature. So what about future implications of Actions for AWS, Microsoft Azure and GCP Cloud compute platforms? Actions could even pose a threat to the centrality and stickiness of the cloud console, because If developers can drive all their workflows from GitHub they have less need to use the console. It might seem absurd to position GitHub as an AWS competitor … but there is no denying the potential for GitHub to lessen the primacy of a cloud operator console in favor of Actions scripted in GitHub, triggering actions and deployments across multiple clouds. GitHub used its keynote to demonstrate the ability to deploy a workload across multiple clouds. Mark your calendars for November 28th! We’re releasing a new episode on The Changelog talking GitHub Actions with Kyle Daigle, Director of Ecosystem Engineering at GitHub, and one of the leaders to bring Actions to fruition. Stay tuned!

read more...

JavaScript blog.mgechev.com

Guess.js - a toolkit for enabling data-driven user-experiences on the web

Our goal with Guess.js is to minimize your bundle layout configuration, make it data-driven, and much more accurate! In the end, you should lazy load all your routes and Guess.js will figure out which bundles to be combined together and what pre-fetching mechanism to be used! All this in less than 5 minutes setup time. That’s an excellent goal! But how will that work? During the build process, the GuessPlugin will fetch report from Google Analytics, build a model used for predictive pre-fetching and add a small runtime to the main bundle of your application. On route change, the runtime will query the generated model for the pages that are likely to be visited next and pre-fetch the associated with them JavaScript bundles. The tool was announced at Google I/O back in May, but as of today it’s still in alpha.

read more...

Scott Jehl filamentgroup.com

Inlining or caching? Both please!

I was exploring patterns that enable the browser to render a page as fast as possible by including code alongside the initial HTML so that the browser has everything it needs to start rendering the page, without making additional requests. Our two go-to options to achieve this goal are inlining and server push (more on how we use those), but each has drawbacks: inlining prevents a file from being cached for reuse, and server push is still a bit experimental, with some browser bugs still being worked out. As I was preparing to describe these caveats, I thought, “I wonder if the new Service Worker and Caching APIs could enable caching for inline code.” I’ve been dabbling a bit with service workers over on Brightly Colored to improve the loading time, so this exploration of caching inline CSS is fascinating. In fact, I used to completely inline all the CSS on the site, but switched to a file request because of the way I thought service workers, well… worked. Surprisingly, this implementation doesn’t look too difficult.

read more...
0:00 / 0:00