Jason Warner medium.com

GitHub's CTO on architecting engineering teams that scale

Get some wisdom from Jason Warner, CTO of GitHub on building and leading engineering teams that scale. If building a high-powered engineering team is hard, successfully scaling it through hyper-growth is near impossible. The culture of any organization is shaped by the worst behavior the leader is willing to tolerate. Culture isn’t just about the “feels;” it’s about accountability and behavior. Whatever you do as a leader and whatever you tolerate becomes the standard for your entire organization.

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Heroku Icon Heroku – Sponsored

Six strategies for deploying to Heroku

How do you know which method is the “best” method for your team to deploy to Heroku? This post presents six of the most common ways to deploy apps to Heroku and how they might fit into your deployment strategy. There are many ways of deploying your applications to Heroku—so many, in fact, that we would like to offer some advice on which to choose. Each strategy provides different benefits based on your current deployment process, team size, and app. Choosing an optimal strategy can lead to faster deployments, increased automation, and improved developer productivity.

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Marko Saric markosaric.com

Fighting back against Google AMP

Marko Saric shared 6 ways to fight back against Google AMP and make your sites faster than AMP without using AMP. There’s a popular thread on Hacker News with lots of people complaining about how Google AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) is ruining their mobile web experience. This week I also got two AMP links sent to me via Telegram and to see those Google URLs replacing unique domain names made me a bit sad on behalf of the owners of those sites. As a site owner myself, it feels like sovereignty of a website being taken away. Here’s how you can fight back against Google AMP…

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Opensource.com Icon Opensource.com

Why choose Xfce for your lightweight Linux desktop

The Xfce desktop has a specific, self-stated goal: to be fast on a system with low resources while being visually appealing and user-friendly. It’s been the de facto choice for lightweight Linux distributions (or remixes) for years and is often cited by its fans as a desktop that provides just enough to be useful, but never so much as to be a burden. I’ve never used Xfce myself, but I’ve heard plenty of my fellow devs sings its praises over the years.

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DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

How to build and install Go programs

From the how to code in Go series on DigitalOcean’s Community site from our friends at Gopher Guides (Mark Bates & Cory LaNou). In Go, the process of translating source code into a binary executable is called building. Once this executable is built, it will contain not only your application, but also all the support code needed to execute the binary on the target platform. This means that a Go binary does not need system dependencies such as Go tooling to run on a new system, unlike other languages like Ruby, Python, or Node.js.

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Rails matestack.org

Rapidly create interactive UIs in pure Ruby

I like the why behind Matestack: Implementing two separate systems (backend-api, frontend-app) is a pain: Two different code bases, two repositories to maintain, two different deployment schedules, two test environments, two everything… Being a small dev team, we decided not to adopt this modern web development complexity and decided to create… Matestack! If you have 30 minutes and want an easy button to learn all about it, Jonas Jabari gave a talk on it at Ruby Unconf 2019.

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Docker github.com

Minify and secure your docker containers (30x?)

DockerSlim promises a lot: docker-slim will optimize and secure your containers by understanding your application and what it needs using various analysis techniques. It will throw away what you don’t need reducing the attack surface for your container. What if you need some of those extra things to debug your container? You can use dedicated debugging side-car containers for that. Their minification examples are impressive…

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Matt Asay infoworld.com

How open source changed everything — again

While many of us writing our year-end wrap-ups, Matt Asay saunters into the room, kindly requests that we “hold his beer”, and proceeds to write his decade-end wrap-up. We’re about to conclude another decade of open source, and what a long, strange trip it has been. Reading back through predictions made in 2009, no one had the foggiest clue that GitHub would change software development forever (and for everyone), or that Microsoft would go from open source pariah to the world’s largest contributor, or a host of other dramatic changes that became the new normal during a decade that was anything but normal. We are all open sourcerors now as we round out the decade. Let’s look back at some of the most significant open source innovations that got us here.

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Kotlin github.com

A cross-platform markdown editor written in Kotlin Multiplatform

Press was created as a proof-of-concept for exploring Kotlin Multiplatform, as well as the author’s frustration from the lack of minimal markdown note taking apps that work on all platforms, especially Android and macOS. If you relate to either of these reasons, Press is looking for contributors. Markdown editors are the new Twitter clients.

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Manuel Vila freeCodeCamp

How to simplify full-stack development with a unified architecture

Manuel Vila, writing for freeCodeCamp: In this article, I introduce the concept of “unified architecture” that dramatically simplifies the development of full-stack applications. Indeed, this architecture unifies the six physical layers (data access, backend model, API server, API client, frontend model, and user interface) usually seen in “well-designed” applications into one single logical layer. It is like going from a 3D world to a 2D world. Everything gets a lot easier. That “unified architecture” manifests itself as Liaison, which we linked to last week and it caused some… controversy discussion. In this article, Manuel explains why Liaison is different than similar RPC things that came before it. Interesting stuff, to say the least.

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Twitter Icon Twitter

Twitter wants an open / decentralized standard for social media

Jack Dorsey: Twitter is funding a small independent team of up to five open source architects, engineers, and designers to develop an open and decentralized standard for social media. The goal is for Twitter to ultimately be a client of this standard. Color me surprised and impressed. My first thought was, “why create something brand new when smart people have been working on open standards for a long time already?” Then I read on: For social media, we’d like this team to either find an existing decentralized standard they can help move forward, or failing that, create one from scratch. That’s the only direction we at Twitter, Inc. will provide. Verrry interesting, indeed. What do you think will come of all this?

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