Suz Hinton Avatar The Changelog #288  – Pinned

Live coding open source on Twitch

Suz Hinton joined the show to talk about live coding open source on Twitch. We talk about how she got interested in Twitch, her goals and aspirations for live streaming, the work she's doing in open source, Twitch for open source, how you and others can get started — and maybe some other fun stuff we have in the works at Changelog.

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-17T07:06:38.519399Z permalink #streaming #practices

Ken Nilsen

Show MDN browser compatibility data on the command line

mdncomp shows MDN browser compatibility data and documentation in an instance right on the command line to see if a feature is supported or not in target browsers. It can list an excerpt from MDN documentation, provide a link, and optionally go directly to that page, if needed. Bonus — try mdncomp --random --doc . to explore APIs and features you've never heard about.

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-22T04:34:00.010669Z permalink #cli #front-end

Request For Commits Request For Commits #20

Request For Commits finale episode (thank you!)

In this finale episode of Request For Commits – we regroup to discuss how we got here, lessons learned, community impact, and where the conversations around open source sustainability are taking place now and in the future. This might be the end of this podcast, but the conversation will continue on The Changelog. You should subscribe if you're not already.

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-21T20:21:18.563891Z permalink #sustainability #culture

Linode Icon Linode – Sponsored

Install, configure, and deploy NGINX on a Kubernetes cluster

If you want to tinker in your free time and learn about NGINX on a Kubernetes Cluster, then this is an inexpensive way to follow along as Kiran Singh walks you through setting up Kubernetes on Linode. This guide shows you how to set up a Kubernetes cluster on a Linode and manage the lifecycle of an NGINX service. BTW — here's a link to all the guides Linode has on containers. Use this link OR use the code changelog2018 to get a $20 credit.

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Stack Overflow Icon

Has Stack Overflow become toxic too?

Consumers of Stack Overflow content may not feel this way, but the developers who are engaging, commenting, and answering are being "lectured, down-voted, and leave with an empty feeling of wasted time." Constantine Murenin, writes in this OpenBSD mailing list thread: The StackOverflow company routinely deletes your comments, questions and answers, often for very superficial reasons (including automatically based on metrics) and without any regard to the individual quality thereof, and effectively without you having any control over the explicitly human-generated textual data that you entrust them with. (Most folks don't even know this, until they're already hooked and their questions/comments/answers are gone and unfetchable.) Who likes their own well-articulated notes randomly deleted for superficial reasons behind their backs? Why not let you see what got deleted, so you can decide whether it's worth reposting in another venue? The content you contribute to Stack Overflow is not guaranteed to be long-lasting immutable content. To dig deeper, click the headline, read this tweet, and read this post

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-21T15:34:10.721751Z permalink #stack-overflow #culture

React Icon

Reacto – an IDE built just for React

Boasting a built-in package manager, smart/fast autocomplete, and component previewing, Reacto is an interesting option if you do React work all-day-every-day. Here's the why: There is absolutely no free software, all-included for React development. The idea is to create the right tool for everyone, to build ideas faster. This is a community project, using plain React code. Anyone can contribute and make it better. Anyone can suggest ideas and help everyone having the perfect tools in their hands. This is what Reacto aims to be: useful.

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-20T19:03:00.011635Z permalink #react #electron

Griffin Byatt

Sobelow – a security-focused static analyzer for the Phoenix framework

Yesterday, Griffin Byatt hit me up in Slack and let me know we had a few security holes. 😱 After a quick discussion about the magnitude of said holes, he informed me that he'd found them by running our code through his static analysis tool, Sobelow. Say what? For security researchers, it is a useful tool for getting a quick view of points-of-interest. For project maintainers, it can be used to prevent the introduction of a number of common vulnerabilities. I asked Griffin if he'd be kind enough to open a PR with the fixes so we can link it up and use it to show folks how handy this tool is. So that's what he did and that's what I'm doing! 💚

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-20T14:48:00.012895Z permalink #phoenix #security

Command Line Heroes Icon Command Line Heroes – Sponsored

Crack the Cloud_Open

In this episode Major Hayden, Bridget Kromhout, and others explain where the cloud is heading and where that leaves open source developers. "There is no cloud. It's just someone else's computer." Or server, to be exact. Big cloud providers offer a relatively easy way to scale out workloads. But what's the real cost? Command Line Heroes, a new podcast from Red Hat, takes you on a journey of epic true tales of the developers, hackers, and open source rebels revolutionizing the tech landscape. Subscribe at

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Daniel Stenberg

curl turns 20! 🎂

At this time in 1998 Titanic was winning 11 Oscars, My Heart Will Go On was topping the music charts, and Daniel Stenberg was uploading the first public release of one of the most useful tools in Internet history. In this birthday post, Daniel walks down memory lane and says what those first few years were like: It was far from an immediate success. An old note mentions how curl 4.8 (released the summer of 1998) was downloaded more than 300 times from the site. We talked about curl on The Changelog when it was 17 years old. I think It’s time to bring Daniel back on to celebrate the big Two Oh. 🎊

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-20T12:34:00.011538Z permalink #http #culture

Vue.js Icon

Vue.js gets a cookbook 👩‍🍳

Unlike the guide which walks you through building a Vue app in story form, the cookbook is all about focused examples of how to accomplish specific goals with the framework. This is an excellent addition to the compendium of documentation in support of the project, and one that’s worthy of emulation once your framework has a base set of docs that are solid.

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-20T02:18:00.11620Z permalink #vue #documentation #javascript

Yegor Bugayenko

Fluent interfaces are bad for maintainability

Yegor Bugayenko: Fluent interface, first coined as a term by Martin Fowler, is a very convenient way of communicating with objects in OOP. It makes their facades easier to use and understand. However, it ruins their internal design, making them more difficult to maintain. A few words were said about that by Marco Pivetta in his blog post Fluent Interfaces are Evil; now I will add my few cents. Yegor uses his own HTTP library as an example where the interface designed is fluent (which looks nice and readable to use) and shows how that design goal made the internal code a mess. My gut tells me it's worth the trade-off to provide a better user experience, but Yegor's real-life experience punches me right in the gut: Fluent interfaces are perfect for their users... However, the damage they cause to object design is the price, which is too high. He suggests decorators and smart objects as an alternative. Lots to ponder here, and the conversation going on in the comments is lively as well. 👌

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-19T13:52:00.10850Z permalink #oop #practices

Dimitri Fontaine

Database modeling anti-patterns 🙅‍♀️

Dimitri Fontaine shares 3 classic data-modeling anti-patterns. The UUID section lacks strong argumentation, but the real gem in this article is his advice at the end. A snippet: My advice is to always normalize your database model first, and then only fix the problems you have with that when you actually have them. Well except in those 3% of cases where really, really, it should be done in the design phase of the project. It’s quite hard to recognize those 3% though, and that ability is hard gained with experience. Experience is the ultimate teacher.

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-18T22:24:00.008452Z permalink #database #practices

Rust Icon

An open source Spotify client running as a UNIX daemon

Spotifyd streams music just like the official client, but is more lightweight, and supports more platforms. Spotifyd also supports the Spotify Connect protocol, which makes it show up as a device that can be controlled from the official clients. There was previously a spotifyd written in C, but apparently Spotify killed the library it used, so they had to rewrite from scratch. ¯\(ツ)/¯

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-18T12:05:00.10090Z permalink #rust

Cloudflare Blog Icon Cloudflare Blog

Everyone can now run JavaScript on Cloudflare with service workers

Cloudflare gave Kenton Varda a mission — Make it so developers could run code on Cloudflare's edge. Kenton Varda, writes on the Cloudflare blog: Eventually, we settled on what now seems the obvious choice: JavaScript, using the standard Service Workers API, running in a new environment built on V8. Five months ago, we gave you a preview of what we were building, and started the beta. Today, with thousands of scripts deployed and many billions of requests served, Cloudflare Workers is now ready for everyone.

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-18T05:07:45.66820Z permalink #javascript

Medium Icon Medium

You’re not lazy

The subtitle here should have been “We’re all very !#$@%#$ afraid”. The reason I often hold back from doing something or when I self-sabotage a goal — the real reason is because I’m afraid of what will happen if this thing is actually successful??! Then, I’ll have to actually do it. 😱 John Gorman, writes for Personal Growth on Medium: Fear doesn’t manifest itself like you think, because often times we don’t give it the chance to. Fear isn’t always the sweaty palms that stop us cold in a job interview — fear is generally what prevents us from applying in the first place. Spend 8 minutes and read this.

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-16T17:29:15.836089Z permalink #practices

Ashley McNamara Medium

Building bridges to GopherCon 2018

Ashley McNamara is doing a series of fundraisers starting now and ending on July 1st. The goal is to raise money for GoBridge and WomenWhoGo — two organizations who make it their mission to educate & empower underrepresented communities. I can't wait to see how many of these tees the community will be wearing at GopherCon later this year. I'm imagining a sea of Gophers rocking these shirts!

logged by @adamstac 2018-03-16T16:24:00.836913Z permalink #go #culture

project Icon

Bitwise – learn by creating the software/hardware for a computer from scratch

Per Vognsen has started live streaming daily while he builds a computer from scratch. The backstory: After working as a game developer and systems programmer for over 15 years at places like Epic Games, NVIDIA, RAD Game Tools and most recently Oculus, I decided it was time to take a break from professional programming and spend a few years pursuing a long-time dream of mine, a project I've dubbed Bitwise, where I want to share my passion and try to demonstrate by example how to build systems from scratch, with a low-level computing focus. Sounds super cool, but also overwhelming. Did he really say, "spend a few years"? For a project that ambitious, you gotta have goals: My goal with Bitwise is to show that these things can be done much more simply and quickly than people realize if we strongly favor simplicity over marginal gains in feature completeness or performance. The goal is not to outdo or compete with any existing product; the goal is to show how things work with real hardware and software. I'm sold. I subscribed us to his Twitch channel and look forward to following along!

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-16T16:13:00.013424Z permalink #learn #streaming

Awesome Lists Icon

Explore the peer-to-peer web with Beaker

This repo hosts a curated list of websites and apps that run in the Beaker Browser. Is Beaker new to you like it was to me? Here's its pitch: Beaker is a peer-to-peer browser with tools to create and host websites. Don't just browse the Web, build it. If you've been following the podcast for awhile, you know I've been intrigued by the recent efforts around decentralization. The thing I keep saying to people in th space is, "this stuff is too hard for people to use." Perhaps Beaker is a first step toward making the decentralized web user-friendly...

logged by @jerodsanto 2018-03-16T14:28:00.012378Z permalink #awesome #p2p

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