The Changelog The Changelog #475  – Pinned

Making the ZFS file system

This week Matt Ahrens joins Adam to talk about ZFS. Matt co-founded the ZFS project at Sun Microsystems in 2001. And 20 years later Adam picked up ZFS for use in his home lab and loved it. So, he reached out to Matt and invited him on the show. They cover the origins of the file system, its journey from proprietary to open source, architecture choices like copy-on-write, the ins and outs of creating and managing ZFS, RAID-Z and RAID-Z expansion, and Matt even shares plans for ZFS in the cloud with ZFS object store.

Git render.com

Git organized: a better git flow

Imagine this: you’ve been paged to investigate a production incident, and after some digging, you identify the commit with the breaking code. You decide to revert the change:

git revert 1a2b3c

Unfortunately, in doing so, a new bug is introduced! As it turns out, hidden in that old “broken” commit was some code that another part of the app depended upon, and when you reverted those lines, it left the site once again in a broken state. 🙃 Oh dear.

How can situations like this be avoided? To answer this question, we first need to examine how these types of commits come to be.

If you’ve never heard of or used git reset… this article is a must-read.

Productivity jakobgreenfeld.com

Effortless personal productivity (or how I learned to love my monkey mind)

Jakob Greenfeld:

I recently discovered a simple step-by-step process that significantly increased my personal productivity and made me happier along the way.

It costs $0 and no, it’s not some note-taking or to-do list system.

The steps are:

  1. develop meta-awareness of your state of mind.
  2. pattern-match to identify your mind’s most common modes.
  3. learn to pick activities that match each mode.

But that probably won’t hit home until you read through his explanation of each step.

Shortcut Icon Shortcut – Sponsored

How to choose the best software development project management tool

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There seems to be infinite project management fish in the software as a service sea, but how do you navigate through the endless options and find the best one for you? Not only that, how do you find one that will work not just for you, but for your entire team and organization? If there’s one major issue with project management software it’s how every single tool promises to help engineers work more efficiently and get things done, while also somehow inspiring non-stop grumbling from half the engineers using them.

This guide from our friends at Shortcut will help you…

  • Break down the types of project management features you should look for
  • Provide you with a framework for how to go about choosing the right project management tool for your software development team
  • Give you a curated list of project management tools recommended by other software engineers and developers to consider and try out

Shayon Mukherjee shayon.dev

Why I enjoy PostgreSQL (an infra engineer's perspective)

This post by Shayon Mukherjee is in response to the recently logged post by Mike Coutermarsh in praise of MySQL for infra folks:

This is not a MySQL vs PostgreSQL post. This is just a small summary of what I have come to appreciate about PostgreSQL as an Infrastructure Engineer.

Always good to keep in mind whenever comparing technologies: trade-offs abound and certain people in certain situations will value certain things about different technologies differently. That’s for certain. 😉

Martin Heinz martinheinz.dev

Building GitHub Apps with Go

If you’re using GitHub as your version control system of choice then GitHub Apps can be incredibly useful for many tasks including building CI/CD, managing repositories, querying statistical data and much more. In this article we will walk through the process of building such an app in Go including setting up the GitHub integration, authenticating with GitHub, listening to webhooks, querying GitHub API and more.

Mike Coutermarsh mikecoutermarsh.com

Why infrastructure engineers prefer MySQL

From Mike Coutermarsh:

For years I’ve been noticing this pattern of infrastructure engineers I really respect preferring MySQL and product engineers preferring Postgres. It took quite a while for me to understand it. Especially coming from my background as a product engineer. Infrastructure engineers generally…

Read on to hear why (from Mike’s perspective).

Daniel Stenberg daniel.haxx.se

Enforcing the pyramid of open source

Daniel Stenberg lays out how he thinks we can view the world of software and open source in light of supply chain security, maintainer sustainability, and the like:

Inside the pyramid there is a hierarchy where things using software are build on top of others, in layers. The higher up you go, the more you stand on the shoulders of open source components below you.

At the very bottom of the pyramid are the foundational components. Operating systems and libraries. The stuff virtually everything runs or depends upon. The components you really don’t want to have serious security vulnerabilities.

Enforcing the pyramid of open source

Opensource.com Icon Opensource.com

Solving Wordle with help from the Linux command line

Jim Hall used grep and some fancy regular expressions to get a leg up on Wordle, the word game that keeps you guessing… but only once per day. Some people may think of Jim’s technique as cheating. I wouldn’t necessarily disagree.

But it’s a lot better than View Source-ing to get at the answer, which you can also do in a pinch. 😉

(Also there’s zero point to Wordle other than having fun, so it’s really only cheating if your answer-finding-method is less fun than you’d have otherwise. Even then, you’re only cheating yourself.)

JavaScript fakerjs.dev

Faker.js is now a community maintained project

Eight people have stepped up to take over maintenance of the suddenly abandoned JS library that generates fake data. These transitions are tricky to make smoothly. Props to the new team on being very careful and thoughtful each step along the way, especially when it comes to funding the project. Here’s a nice note from the new team:

We’re excited to give new life to this idea and project.

This project can have a fresh start and it will become even cooler.

We felt we needed to do a public announcement because of all of the attention the project received in the media and from the community.

We believe that we have acted in the way that is best for the community.

Founders Talk Founders Talk #85

Making the last database you’ll ever need

This week Adam is joined by Sam Lambert, CEO of PlanetScale. Now that PlanetScale is in general availability, Adam had to get Sam on the show to talk about the behind the scenes of building this database platform, how this is the last database you’ll ever need and what that means for developers, why serverless, its open source underpinnings with Vitess, and a preview of what’s to come.

Ned Batchelder nedbatchelder.com

Ned Batchelder's cog tool is an overnight success 17 years in the making

Funny how stuff like this plays out sometimes:

My cog tool has been having a resurgence of late: a number of people are discovering it’s useful to run a little bit of Python code inside otherwise static files.

He goes on to list out a bunch of tweets from people finding it useful for various tasks and even got to talk about the project on podcast.__init__. Cool tool, cool story.

Ship It! Ship It! #35

How I found my lost network packets

Today Gerhard shares the entire story behind his lost packets. He is talking with Drew Marshall, director at Trunk Networks and No One Internet, a Cloud Services Provider & ISP based in Sussex, UK.

Gerhard’s Vodafone ISP gateway was losing packets, and recording some of the previous episodes used to be challenging as his internet connection would cut out up to 10 seconds at a time, multiple times per recording session. He was convinced that his Unifi Dream Machine Pro was not the issue. Drew helped Gerhard realise that it actually was. Not only has Gerhard’s DNS latency improved by 3x, but he can now fail-over between two WAN connections. And because nothing beats a real-world experiment, you can guess what is coming in this episode 😉

You will find latency & packet loss graphs, speed test runs, and a few other interestings in the show notes. We hope that they inspire you to setup a better home network. Most importantly, may you find your humble & brilliant Drew.

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