The Changelog The Changelog #490  – Pinned

Schneier on security for tomorrow’s software

This week we’re talking with Bruce Schneier — cryptographer, computer security professional, privacy specialist, and writer (of many books). He calls himself a “public-interest technologist”, a term he coined himself, and works at the intersection of security, technology, and people.

Bruce has been writing about security issues on his blog since 2004, his monthly newsletter has been going since 1998, he’s a fellow and lecturer at Harvard’s Kennedy School, a board member of the EFF, and the Chief of Security Architecture at Inrupt. Long story short, Bruce has credentials to back up his opinions and on today’s show we dig into the state of cyber-security, security and privacy best practices, his thoughts on Bitcoin (and other crypto-currencies), Tim Berners-Lee’s Solid project, and of course we asked Bruce to share his advice for today’s developers building the software systems of tomorrow.

Practices wilcosky.com

Smaller is better (the rise, fall, and rise of flat file software)

Billy Wilcosky:

Flat file web software is about having a set up which doesn’t use a “traditional” database. Instead it uses plain text files, other files, and/or maybe something like a json feed to store the data.

In this post, he explains why he thinks flat file web software is on the come up (again):

Flat file software can be powerful. Depending on what you need. And I think with the right developers and brain power behind the movement it can be more scalable and secure. The sky’s the limit. When I hear a developer saying, no, flat file isn’t good because… really all I’m hearing is they don’t want to change the way web software works. Because what I’ve found is most anything is possible.

Here’s a couple of flat file platforms which are incredible. One is a CMS/blog, the other a forum. Yes, a flat file forum.

A somewhat-related categorical question: Does SQLite count?

Google Icon Google

A text-to-image diffusion model with an unprecedented degree of photorealism

Google researchers are giving DALL-E a run for its money:

Our key discovery is that generic large language models (e.g. T5), pretrained on text-only corpora, are surprisingly effective at encoding text for image synthesis: increasing the size of the language model in Imagen boosts both sample fidelity and image-text alignment much more than increasing the size of the image diffusion model.

A text-to-image diffusion model with an unprecedented degree of photorealism

Chronosphere Icon Chronosphere – Sponsored

Observability platform for scaling cloud-native

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Chronosphere is the observability platform for cloud-native teams operating at scale.

When it comes to observability, teams need a reliable, scalable, and efficient solution so they can know about issues well before their customers do.

Companies born in the cloud-native era often start with Prometheus for monitoring, which is obviously an amazing piece of software, but they quickly push it to its limits and often outgrow it. They run into issues with siloed data, missing long-term storage, and wasted engineering time firefighting the monitoring system vs delivering their application with confidence.

Learn more and get a demo at chronosphere.io.

Patrick DeVivo github.com

A fluent GraphQL library for Go

This package wraps the graphql-go/graphql implementation to provide a “fluent” pattern for constructing GraphQL queries in Go. This can be valuable in situations where dynamic queries are desired: when the fields of a GraphQL query (or mutation) are not known until runtime. For most other use cases, plain query strings or a helper library such as this should be sufficient.

I wonder if this would change Mislav’s unpopular GraphQL/Go opinion

Chris Kiehl chriskiehl.com

The mindless tyranny of 'what if it changes?' as a software design principle

Chris Kiehl hits his hammer right on the head of this common sentiment in software circles:

Developers from certain languages [Java] have learned to wield this design principle with more power than many others. It’s how we end up with so much stuff in code bases that’s just… there. Existing. Superficially it appears unused, but silently and stoically, we know it protects us from the turbulent future change which lurks ever ahead.

The antithesis of one of my favorite design principles: YAGNI

Ship It! Ship It! #53

Securing K8s releases (KubeCon EU 2022)

Today we are at KubeCon CloudNativeCon EU 2022, talking to Adolfo García Veytia about securing Kubernetes releases. Adolfo is a Staff Software Engineer at Chainguard, and one of the technical leads for SIG release, meaning that he helps ship Kubernetes. You most likely know him as Puerco, and have seen first-hand his passion for securing software via SBOMs, cosign and SLSA. Puerco’s love for bikes and Chainguard are a great match 🚴‍♂️

JS Party JS Party #226

The third year of the third age of JS

In 2020, Shawn (swyx) Wang wrote:

Every 10 years there is a changing of the guard in JavaScript. I think we have just started a period of accelerated change that could in thge future be regarded as the Third Age of JavaScript.

We’re now in year three of this third age and Swyx joins us to look back at what he missed, look around at what’s happening today, and look forward at what might be coming next.

Ryan Dahl tinyclouds.org

On the potential of JavaScript-based containers

Ryan Dahl describes the JavaScript sandbox as a higher level container for server software:

This container isn’t meant to address the same breadth of problems that Linux containers target. Its emergence is a result of its simplicity. It minimizes the boilerplate for web service business logic. It shares concepts with the browser and reduces the concepts that the programmer needs to know.

People like Ryan and his colleagues at Deno are exploring this future, but it’s not quite here yet.

Founders Talk Founders Talk #90

From GitHub TV to Rewatch

Connor Sears, founder and CEO of Rewatch, joins Adam to share the journey of creating Rewatch. What began inside of GitHub to help them thrive and connect is now available to every product team on the planet. Rewatch lets teams save, manage, and search all their video content so they can collaborate async and with greater flexibility. We talk about where the tool’s inspiration came from (spoiler alert, inside GitHub it was called GitHub TV which you’ll hear during the show), how teams leverage video to reduce the constraints of communication, how Connor and his co-founder knew they had product-fit and how they grew the team and product, and of course the flip side of that — we talk about some of Connor’s failures along the way, and knowing when it’s the right time to take a big swing.

Kubernetes enterprisedb.com

CloudNativePG – a new Kubernetes operator for Postgres

CloudNativePG is distributed under the Apache License 2.0, and is now owned and governed by a newly formed community of contributors to the project, built on solid principles and values inspired by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

Among these are openness, fairness, inclusivity, technical excellence, “community over product/company,” built-in quality and built-in security. I’m part of the initial group of maintainers of the project, currently made up by the top six committers of the project within EDB.

If you’ve been following Ship It’s Kaizen episodes, you know we had troubles running Postgres in K8s and recently moved to a managed (sorta) database. I wonder if Gerhard will be tempted to try this operator out anyhow…

Daniel Stenberg un.curl.dev

Everything I know and learned about running and maintaining open source projects for three decades

Curl creator/maintainer Daniel Stenberg is writing a book. It’s (aptly) named: Uncurled

Because of my background and life with Open Source and probably a lot because of the relative success some of my projects have had, I frequently get questions about subjects related to maintaining Open Source. How to run a project and what makes them succeed? For a long time I have been collecting lessons from my life with Open Source into a list of advice for fellow Open Source library hackers. This document is my attempt to convert those thoughts and experiences into words.

I don’t believe it’s finished, but there’s a lot here already! Excited for this and while it’s a free to read GitBook right now, I hope it ends with some kind of physical manifestation.

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