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Awesome Lists

An awesome list is a list of awesome things curated by the community.
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Awesome Lists github.com

A powerful open source toolkit for hackers & security automation

Scanners Box also known as scanbox, is a powerful hacker toolkit, which has collected more than 10 categories of open source scanners from Github, including subdomain, database, middleware and other modular design scanner etc. But for other Well-known scanning tools, such as nmap, w3af, brakeman, arachni, nikto, metasploit, aircrack-ng will not be included in the scope of collection.

Toolkit might be a bit misleading. I was imagning some kind of Docker container or Linux distro with all the tools baked in. This is more of a collection of tools (which is why we applied the Awesome topic to it) that you can pick and choose from. Nice collection, though!

Machine Learning github.com

A collection of resources to learn about MLOps

While still in its infancy, MLOps has attracted machine learning engineers and software engineers in general. With every new paradigm comes new challenges and opportunities to learn. In this primer, we highlight a few available resources to upskill and inform yourself on the latest in the world of MLOps.

Good resources, regardless of whether you think MLOps is its own thing or should be rolled into DevOps.

Awesome Lists github.com

Falsehoods programmers believe in

A falsehood is an idea that you initially believe was true, but in-reality it is proven to be false.

E.g. of an idea: valid email address exactly has one @ character. So, you will use this rule to implement your email-field validation logic. Right? Wrong! The reality is: emails can have multiple @ chars. Therefore your implementation should allow this. The initial idea is a falsehood you believed in.

I love this list with my whole heart. We need to do a show on this…

Awesome Lists github.com

An awesome list of ngrok alternatives & other tunneling solutions

ngrok rocks, but it’s 2nd version is famously closed source*, so many open source alternatives have been developed over the years. So many, in fact, that they now have their own awesome list.

The purpose of this list is to track and compare tunneling solutions. This is primarily targeted toward self-hosters and developers who want to do things like exposing a local webserver via a public domain name, with automatic HTTPS, even if behind a NAT or other restricted network.

*We spoke with Alan Shreve about this decision back when he made it, if you’re curious about his thinking.

Awesome Lists github.com

Open source startup alternatives to well-known SaaS products

The criteria for inclusion is as follows:

  1. Its product is strongly based on an open source repo
  2. It has a well-known closed-sourced competitor, solving a similar business problem
  3. It is a private for-profit company, founded in the last 10 years
  4. Its repo has 100+ stars on GitHub

I’m seeing lots of Changelog guests & friends in this awesome list. 😎

Awesome Lists github.com

An awesome list of internet services that don't require logins or registrations

A curated list of awesome internet services that normally you would have to register for, but due to clever approaches on the part of the service you can use without registering, creating an account and filling endless forms.

Sometimes you just want want some help getting stuff done, but you don’t want to sign up for yet another web service. These sites/services have all figured out how to help you get that done.

API github.com

A collection of free/public APIs you can use to build awesome stuff

There was a glorious (albeit too short) period on the web when we were mashing up APIs from various startups and tech companies to create cool stuff. Then things changed. The web grew up, became Serious Business™️, and free/public APIs got harder and harder to find. Turns out, there’s still a bunch of good ones out there!

This repo has collected them in one long, categorized list for us to reference. 👏

Awesome Lists github.com

Awesome online talks and screencasts

There are a lot of screencasts, recordings of user group gatherings and conference talks available online. I try to commit myself watching at least two new talks every week, and I’ve been doing this for quite some time now. I created this list of online talks that I really enjoyed watching. I’ll also be updating this list whenever I’ve watched another awesome talk that is worthy enough. Suggestions are always appreciated through a pull request.

Awesome Lists github.com

A collection of services with great free tiers for developers on a budget

This repository offers a collection of services with great free tiers for developers on a budget. Because not everyone has 20$ per month to spend on app or database hosting for every single side-project.

Nowadays, a lot of services are offering really good free tier more than enough for testing small apps and even put them in production. They are just waiting to be used by you.

I got a kick out of their FTDD acronym: Free Tier Driven Development

Music github.com

A curated list of music DSP and audio programming resources

Oli Larkin:

This is a curated list of my favourite music DSP and audio programming resources. It was originally meant to be an official “Awesome list”, but apparently you are not meant to write in the first person, so it is now a “more awesome” list.

I’m still giving this the awesome topic, despite his first person point of view. Oli is a long-time audio programmer, so he’s well positioned to curate a list like this one.

Tooling tinytools.directory

A collection of open source, experimental, tiny tools

700+ hand-selected tools across a range of categories such as writing, productivity, pixel art, and more. The headline link goes to the web interface, but you can also get at in rendered Markdown on the GitHub Repo.

Although I’ve mostly also included ‘standards’, this list has a focus on artful tools & toys that are as fun to use as they are functional.

The goal of this list is to enable making entirely outside of closed production ecosystems or walled software gardens.

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