Windows win11.blueedge.me

Windows 11 in React

This open source project is made in the hope to replicate the Windows 11 desktop experience on web, using standard web technologies like React, CSS (SCSS), and JS.

The project description says “in React”, but the source code is comprised of 93.5% CSS. I love this portion of the README that addresses why the author built it (I assume they get this question a lot).

WHY NOT? Why not just waste a week of your life creating a react project just to coverup your insecurities of how incompetent you are. Just Why not!

Windows 11 in React

Brad Van Vugt blog.battlesnake.com

Controlling a battlesnake with a webcam, Replit, and your face

Battlesnake’s Brad Van Vugt:

This past spring on Coding Badly, Joe and I, for whatever reason, challenged ourselves to build a camera-controlled Battlesnake. The result was “Facesnake” – a Battlesnake controlled in real-time using your face and webcam. This post outlines how we built it using Replit and tracking.js :-)

You can also jump straight to the source code or watch Facesnake in action here.

Retool Icon Retool – Sponsored

Top React component libraries in 2021

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Because of React’s ubiquity (169k stars on GitHub)…

Developers have a near-endless supply of UI libraries with custom components to draw upon to build applications. But not all React component libraries are created equal. Some are best for general purposes, others were created specifically for web development, and many are tailored for niche use cases like enterprise product production.

This post from Retool reviews React component libraries based on several factors such as popularity, use cases, documentation, resources, and support.

Kubernetes ably.com

No, we don’t use Kubernetes

At Ably, we run a large scale production infrastructure that powers our customers’ real-time messaging applications around the world. Like in most tech companies, this infrastructure is largely software-based; also like in most tech companies, much of that software is deployed and runs in Docker containers.

As you might expect if you’ve been following the technology scene at all, the following question comes up a lot:

“So… do you use Kubernetes?”

Ably doesn’t, and Maik explains in this artiicle why.

We talked with @lawik about the same topic a few weeks back on Ship It! #7. We even did a follow-up YouTube stream. I think that a conversation with Maik would be really interesting 🎙

PostgreSQL blog.crunchydata.com

Generating JSON directly from Postgres

Too often, web tiers are full of boilerplate that does nothing except convert a result set into JSON. A middle tier could be as simple as a function call that returns JSON. All we need is an easy way to convert result sets into JSON in the database.

PostgreSQL has built-in JSON generators that can be used to create structured JSON output right in the database, upping performance and radically simplifying web tiers. Fortunately, PostgreSQL has such functions, that run right next to the data, for better performance and lower bandwidth usage.

I certainly wouldn’t advise this in many (most?) scenarios, but I can see a time and a place where “cutting out the middle man” would be quite advantageous, indeed. Keep it simple. Keep it lean.

Ship It! Ship It! #9

What is good release engineering?

This week we talk with Jean-Sébastien Pedron, RabbitMQ and FreeBSD contributor, about the importance of good release engineering for core infrastructure. Both Jean-Sébastien and I have been part of the Core RabbitMQ team for many years now. We have built some of the biggest CI/CD pipelines (check the show notes for one example), wrote and shipped some great code together, while breaking and fixing many things in the process.

We have been wrestling with today’s topic since 2016. Jean-Sébastien has some great FreeBSD stories to share, as well as an interesting perspective on shipping graphic card drivers. Oh, and by the way, it’s probably our fault why your remote car key stopped working that afternoon. It will all make sense after you listen to this episode.

RudderStack Icon RudderStack – Sponsored

Reinventing the on-prem deployment model

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There’s a new architecture and deployment paradigm that is gaining momentum and addresses the issues we have today by merging the best from both worlds, on-prem and SaaS.

The SaaS software delivery model has completely transformed the industry and for a good reason. It offers an amazing combination of easiness and maintainability that wasn’t possible in the past with older software delivery models. It works amazingly well when we want to deliver software like CRMs, Marketing platforms, etc.

Regardless of its success, there are still challenges with the adoption of SaaS, especially in the enterprise market where security and compliance are of great importance. Today, with the rapid growth of data-related products, the SaaS model is getting even more challenged while compliance and security are not just an enterprise concern anymore.

This post shares in more detail why we need a new paradigm and what this new model has to offer.

Alex Ellis blog.alexellis.io

The Internet is my computer

In 1984 John Gage of Sun Microsystems was credited as saying “The Network is the computer.” Almost four decades ago, John had a vision of distributed systems working together to be greater than the sum of their parts.

For this article, I surveyed the land of hosted IDEs and it turns out that we’ve progressed beyond running VS Code on an iPad whilst sipping a cocktail.

You can still do that, but there’s way more to it today and I’ll take you through some of use-cases and add my own thoughts. There’s also a practical guide at the end to get started with the open source VS Code browser by Coder.

Command line interface github.com

Slice and dice logs on the command line with Angle Grinder

Angle-grinder allows you to parse, aggregate, sum, average, min/max, percentile, and sort your data. You can see it, live-updating, in your terminal. Angle grinder is designed for when, for whatever reason, you don’t have your data in graphite/honeycomb/kibana/sumologic/splunk/etc. but still want to be able to do sophisticated analytics.

Angle grinder can process well above 1M rows per second (simple pipelines as high as 5M), so it’s usable for fairly meaty aggregation. The results will live update in your terminal as data is processed. Angle grinder is a bare bones functional programming language coupled with a pretty terminal UI.

I’m not gonna lie, they had me with the name on this one.

Slice and dice logs on the command line with Angle Grinder

Raspberry Pi github.com

A low power 1U Raspberry Pi cluster server

There are server colocation providers that allow hosting a 1U server for as low as $30/month, but there’s a catch: There are restrictions on power usage (1A @ 120v max, for example) because they’re expecting small and power-efficient network equipment like firewalls.

This repo is about designing a server that fits within the 1U space and 1A @ 120v power constraint while maximizing computing power, storage, and value.

A low power 1U Raspberry Pi cluster server

Alex Ellis blog.alexellis.io

I wrote a book about Everyday Go

This is my third eBook on Go, and it’s one of the ways I’m supporting my time to make open source contributions and lead the OpenFaaS community. The book covers samples, examples and techniques that I’ve learned over the past 5-6 years.

The point is not to be an 800-page tomb with tenuous links between content, but code from real open source applications that are run in production at scale.

There’s been over 300 copies sold already and I’m offering a money back guarantee if anyone should feel it didn’t meet their expectations.

Lars Wikman underjord.io

My trust in software, an all time low

I don’t think I’ve ever had more distrust and as a consequence distate for software than in recent years. I don’t think its just me as a tech-nerd with artisanal tech-carpentry aspirations. I want people to build well, treat their users right and generally exercise some actual restraint. I see it very clearly and I react more viscerally than anyone non-technical in my surroundings. However, I see the frustrations and the consequences everywhere…

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