JS Party JS Party #96

Performant Node desktop apps with NodeGui

What if you could have an Electron-like app framework without the Chromium dependency and resulting performance woes? Well, now you can. NodeGui is a Qt5-powered, cross-platform, native app GUI framework for JavaScript with CSS-like styling. In this episode, Jerod and Nick sit down with Atul –author of NodeGUI and NodeGUI React– to learn about this exciting framework. We ask him a zillion and one questions about it.

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Harvard Business Review Icon Harvard Business Review

Entrepreneurs who sleep more are better at spotting good ideas

While this study was focused on “entrepreneurs”, I would say the function of sleep applies to all humans and can be expended to “creators” at large — or anyone who is in an position of trading sleep for progress. We’re exploring this very topic on an upcoming episode of Brain Science. Subscribe if you haven’t already! In our paper we investigated fundamental functions required of a founder in the early stages of a new venture’s lifecycle: the generation of new venture ideas and the formation of beliefs about a new venture’s potential. In a series of three interrelated studies, we show that entrepreneurs who shortchange sleep analyze business opportunities differently than their well-rested counterparts, and even differently than their well-rested selves.

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Kevin Ball speakwritelisten.com

Speak. Write. Listen.

JS Party co-host KBall just launched a new site: Improve your career, your relationships, and your self-confidence by becoming a better communicator. I’ve known Kevin for awhile now and I can assure you, the dude is an excellent communicator. This, from his newsletter, resonates 100% with me: If there’s one thing that I can point to that has contributed most to my career success, it’s been my relentless focus on improving my abilities to speak in public, write coherently, and listen carefully. We nerded out on this stuff back on JS Party #93. I heartily suggest listening to that if you haven’t yet.

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DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

Take the worry out of managing PostgreSQL, MySQL & Redis

Our friends at DigitalOcean introduced managed databases for PostgreSQL earlier this year. Recently, they added two new databases to their managed databases mix — MySQL and Redis! Whether you are using MySQL, Redis, or PostgreSQL, building and managing database clusters from the ground up is a herculean task. Developers often spend valuable time and resources on database management, which prevents them from focusing on building and enhancing apps. We introduced Managed Databases to simplify the lives of developers by addressing these common challenges: Determining the optimal infrastructure needed to host your databases is time-intensive Scaling the infrastructure that supports your database is often a slow and expensive task Implementing reliable failover processes is difficult Over-provisioning of underlying infrastructure leads to increased costs Setting up a complete and reliable backup and recovery process requires a lot of effort Maintaining and updating databases often needs dedicated personnel

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Julia Evans jvns.ca

SQL queries don't start with SELECT

Yesterday I was working on an explanation of window functions, and I found myself googling “can you filter based on the result of a window function”. As in – can you filter the result of a window function in a WHERE or HAVING or something? Eventually I concluded “window functions must run after WHERE and GROUP BY happen, so you can’t do it”. But this led me to a bigger question – what order do SQL queries actually run in? Kind of a snappy headline because Julia is talking about order in terms of execution and most of the time we’re thinking about order in terms of authoring. But still, TIL!

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StackShare Icon StackShare

Cultivating your data lake

This post by Lauren Reeder of Segment goes over the different layers to consider when working with a data lake. What’s a data lake, you ask? A data lake is a centralized repository that stores both structured and unstructured data and allows you to store massive amounts of data in a flexible, cost effective storage layer. Her article explains what tools are needed and provides code & SQL statements to get started. 🤟

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Eric Holscher ericholscher.com

Using a Welcome Wagon to help first-time conference attendees

Eric told us a little bit about this idea on this year’s OSCON episode, and I’m so glad he took the time to write it up. Conference organizers: steal this idea! At Write the Docs, we’re working to make the community easier to join because we want everyone to feel welcome. We do this with the Welcome Wagon program, which helps attendees at both the planning and the attending stages of the conference. We hope that this breaks down barriers to help them get the most value from our community.

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Machine Learning github.com

The fastest way to build custom ML tools

Streamlit lets you create apps for your machine learning projects with deciptively simple Python scripts. It supports hot-reloading, so your app updates live as you edit and save your file. No need to mess with HTTP requests, HTML, JavaScript, etc. All you need is your favorite editor and a browser. Coming soon to a Practical AI podcast near you…

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The Changelog The Changelog #364

Maintainer spotlight! Valeri Karpov

In this episode we’re shining our maintainer spotlight on Valeri Karpov. Val has been the solo maintainer of Mongoose since 2014. This episode with Val continues our maintainer spotlight series where we dig deep into the life of an open source software maintainer. We’re producing this series in partnership with Tidelift. Huge thanks to Tidelift for making this series possible.

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Opensource.com Icon Opensource.com

7 Bash history shortcuts you will actually use

When people see me use these shortcuts, they often ask me, “What did you do there!?” There’s minimal effort or intelligence required, but to really learn them, I recommend using one each day for a week, then moving to the next one. It’s worth taking your time to get them under your fingers, as the time you save will be significant in the long run. Good advice on how to adopt these. Habit formation requires persistence.

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Test Double Icon Test Double

Deconstructing the bike shed

A thought-provoking piece by Joshua Wehner on Test Double’s blog: For the metaphor to work, at all, we have to have a shared understanding of what’s important and what’s trivial. Kamp is saying (1) color does not matter, and (2) the topic they are debating matters as little as if they were debating color. For decades, software developers have been fine with this. And yet… Color is an amazingly deep topic! There are books on the history of color. There are fascinating stories about how colors got their names, how they were made, how they impact fashion, how they tell stories… until software emits smells, color will be one of the most important aspects for developers to understand when considering how human beings will interact with our software. I never thought that color doesn’t matter, just that for the purpose of the metaphor color doesn’t matter in the context of a bike shed. This thought leads Joshua to another one: Software developers—and other professionals who are oriented around quantitative thinking—have a tendency to dismiss more qualitative disciplines such as design, marketing, or management—which also turn out to be exactly the disciplines best-suited to mitigating the kinds of dead-end discussions the bike shed legend is supposedly built to address. This I’ve 💯% seen in the wild. In conference rooms and in online discussions, I frequently seen software developers deploy the bike shed myth as an attempt to minimize a topic they see as unimportant and to label that discussion as a trivial distraction. I need to stop or I’ll end up quoting the entire article. Like I said, lots of thoughts being provoked here. A must-read, even if you end up disagreeing with his conclusions.

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TensorFlow github.com

TensorFlow 2.0 focuses on simplicity and ease of use

Folks have been talking about TensorFlow 2 for some time now (See Practical AI #42 for one excellent example), but now it’s finally here. The bulleted list: Easy model building with Keras and eager execution. Robust model deployment in production on any platform. Powerful experimentation for research. API simplification by reducing duplication and removing deprecated endpoints. This is a huge release. Check out the highlights list in the changelog to see for yourself.

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JavaScript levelup.gitconnected.com

Moving beyond console.log() — 8 console methods you should use when debugging JS and Node

When talking about the Console API, newbies usually use only some functions like 👌console.log(), ⚠️ console.warn(), or ❌ console.error() to debug their application, while often there are many other methods which can perfectly implement our requirements and improve debugging efficiency. Guilty! ✋ This article is made to expose some of the most interesting console methods with related examples that I use while teaching at Codeworks. So let’s see a list of the 8 best functions from the Console module! I have used console.table a few times (totally rad), but there’s plenty of functions here that I haven’t been using (and definitely should be).

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