Rust Medium (via Scribe)

Using Rust at a startup: a cautionary tale

Matt Welsh:

I hesitated writing this post, because I don’t want to start, or get into, a holy war over programming languages. (Just to get the flame bait out of the way, Visual Basic is the best language ever!) But I’ve had a number of people ask me about my experience with Rust and whether they should pick up Rust for their projects. So, I’d like to share some of the pros and cons that I see of using Rust in a startup setting, where moving fast and scaling teams is really important.

The learning curve and hiring difficulties seem to be the major culprits, in Matt’s experience.

Ship It! Ship It! #80

Kaizen! 24 improvements & a lot more

For our last 2022 Kaizen episode, we went all out:

  • 💪 @jerod outdid himself in the number of improvements shipped between Kaizens
  • 🕺 A few of our listeners contributed → prompted us to create a new contributing guide
  • 🗺 We now have a new infrastructure diagram

All of this, and a whole lot more, is captured as GitHub discussion 🐙 changelog.com#433. If you want to see everything that we improved, that is a great companion to this episode.

Gustav Westling westling.dev

Introducing the extremely linear git history

An interesting idea from Gustav Westling…

One of the things that I like to do in my projects, is to make the git history as linear as possible.

Usually this means to rebase commits onto the main branch, but it can also mean to only allow merges in one direction, from feature branches into main, never the other way around. It kind of depends on the project.

Today I’m taking this one step further, and I’m introducing a new concept: extremely linear git history.

With our extremely linear history, the first commit in a repo hash a hash that starts with 0000000, the second commit is 0000001, the third is 0000002, and so on!

How he accomplishes this is perhaps even more interesting (and hacky!)

Introducing the extremely linear git history

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Ops matthewtejo.substack.com

Why Twitter didn’t go down (from a real Twitter SRE)

Matthew Tejo:

Twitter supposedly lost around 80% of its work force. What ever the real number is, there are whole teams with out engineers on it now. Yet, the website goes on and the tweets keep coming. This left a lot wondering what exactly was going on with all those engineers and made it seem like it was all just bloat. I’d like to explain my little corner of Twitter (though it wasn’t so little) and some of the work that went on that kept this thing running.

This is a detailed post about Twitter’s caching system that Matthew and others built while working there, and it’s brilliantly summed up by commenter Johnny Manu40:

When everything works fine, they wonder why they hired you. When everything stops working, they wonder why they hired you. I.T. in a nutshell.

Christoffer Ekeroth chreke.com

Little languages are the future of programming

Christoffer Ekeroth:

I’ve become convinced that “little languages”—small languages designed to solve very specific problems—are the future of programming, particularly after reading Gabriella Gonzalez’s The end of history for programming and watching Alan Kay’s Programming and Scaling talk.

Examples of “little languages” include SQL and regular expressions. In the old days we called these DSLs, but the author argues that term has become overloaded and I have a hard time disagreeing with that.

Max Howell github.com

tea is not a package manager. tea is unified packaging infrastructure

Homebrew creator Max Howell is back with a brand new invention:

tea is a standalone, binary download for all platforms that puts the entire open source ecosystem at your fingertips. Casually and effortlessly use the latest and greatest or the oldest and most mature from any layer of any stack. Break down the silos between programming communities, throw together scripts that use entirely separate tools and languages and share them with the world with a simple one-liner.

All you need is tea.

Bold! I love how many interesting ideas are packed in to this project: pipelines, universal virtual-env, executable markdown… the list goes on. Check out the README for all the deets. My big question is: might Max and the team be thinking too big this time around?

The Changelog The Changelog #515

ANTHOLOGY — Advocating for and supporting open source

This week we’re taking you to the hallway track of All Things Open 2022 in Raleigh, NC. Let’s set the stage, here’s what we like do when we go to conferences — we setup our podcast studio at our booth where all the other vendors are and we talk to everyone we can. We give out t-shirts, stickers, pins, high fives…and it’s a blast.

Today’s anthology episode from ATO features: Arun Gupta (VP and GM of Open Ecosystem Initiatives at Intel), long-time friend Chad Whitacre (Head of Open Source at Sentry), and Ricardo Sueiras (Principal Advocate in Open Source at AWS).

The common denominator for each of these conversations is advocating for and supporting open source. Special thanks to Todd Lewis and team for inviting us to come back to ATO. We enjoyed meeting long time fans and new ones too.

Ship It! Ship It! #75

How vex.dev runs on AWS, Fly.io & GCP

Few genuinely need a multi-cloud setup. There is plenty of advice out there which mostly boils down to don’t do it, you will be worse off. Vex.dev is a startup that provides APIs for video and audio streaming. The hard part is real-time combined with massive scale - think hundreds of thousands of concurrent connections. They achieve this by using a combination of Fly.io, AWS and GCP. Jason Carter, founder of Vex Communications, is joining us today to talk about the multi-cloud setup that vex.dev runs.

Ship It! Ship It! #79

Developer Experience Infrastructure (DXI)

In your company, who designs the end-to-end developer experience? From design to implementation, what is the developer experience that you actually ship? Even though the average developer wastes almost half of their working hours because of bad DX, many of us don’t even know what that means, or how to improve it.

Kenneth Auchenberg is working at Stripe, building economic infrastructure for the internet. Gerhard found his perspective on Developer Experience Infrastructure (DXI) refreshingly simple, as well as very useful.

GitHub kolide.com

GitHub Copilot isn't worth the risk

Elaine Atwell says all CTOs urgently need to answer the question: should I allow Copilot at my company?

If you haven’t already figured it out from the title, Elaine’s answer to that question is No. But that might not be the right answer for everyone. In this article, she goes over the case for and against Copilot, and how you can detect whether it’s already in use at your organization.

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