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What do 37,000 developers say about Postman?

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Postman surveyed over 37,000 developers to ask them how they worked with APIs. Most of those findings are in their State of the API Report (2022), but there were a few things to highlight separately. Here’s what they learned:

  • 89% would be unhappy if they were not allowed to use Postman anymore
  • 81% say Postman is necessary for enabling an API-first development model
  • 51% say a majority of their organization’s development effort is spent on APIs
  • 75% say Postman helps them collaborate with developers better than other platforms or tools

This is the fourth year in a row for Postman’s State of the API survey and report. It’s the largest and most comprehensive survey and report on APIs. You should check it out.

Docker docker.com

Docker apologizes for their Docker Free Teams announcement

Docker CMO, Tim Anglade:

For those of you catching up, we recently emailed accounts that are members of Free Team organizations, to let them know that they will lose features unless they move to one of our supported free or paid offerings. This impacted less than 2% of our users…

The Docker Free Team subscription was deprecated in part because it was poorly targeted. In particular, it didn’t serve the open source audience as well as our recently updated Docker-Sponsored Open Source program, the latter offering benefits that exceed those of the deprecated Free Team plan.

We’d also like to clarify that public images will only be removed from Docker Hub if their maintainer decides to delete them. We’re sorry that our initial communications failed to make this clear.

Just to be clear: their apology is not about the change, it’s about how they communicated the change. There’s more details in the post about deleting public images, squatting names, etc, but that’s the gist.

Daniel Rosenwasser devblogs.microsoft.com

Announcing TypeScript 5.0

TypeScript PM, Daniel Rosenwasser:

This release brings many new features, while aiming to make TypeScript smaller, simpler, and faster. We’ve implemented the new decorators standard, added functionality to better support ESM projects in Node and bundlers, provided new ways for library authors to control generic inference, expanded our JSDoc functionality, simplified configuration, and made many other improvements.

Alex Ellis blog.alexellis.io

Docker is deleting open source orgs - what you need to know

Alex Ellis:

Yesterday, Docker sent an email to any Docker Hub user who had created an “organisation”, telling them their account will be deleted including all images, if they do not upgrade to a paid team plan. The email contained a link to a tersely written PDF (since, silently edited) which was missing many important details which caused significant anxiety and additional work for open source maintainers.

He goes on to explain the problem in great details. Btw, Alex is no Docker hater. He has a long history of using and supporting the tech. He goes on to say:

Open Source has a funding problem, and Docker was born in Open Source. We the community were their king makers, and now that they’re turning over significant revenue, they are only too ready to forget their roots.

This decision seems myopic. There are other image hosting options, one of them even shares (inspired?) half of DockerHub’s name… Oh, and here’s our open invitation to the folks at Docker to come on the pod.

The Changelog The Changelog #529

You’re just a devcontainer.json away

This week we’re joined by Brigit Murtaugh, Product Manager on the Visual Studio Code team at Microsoft, and we’re talking about Development Containers and the Dev Container spec. Ever since we talked with Cory Wilkerson about Coding in the cloud with Codespaces we’ve wanted to get the Changelog.com codebase setup with a dev environment in the cloud to more easily support contributions. After getting a drive-by contribution from Chris Eggert to add a Dev Container spec to our codebase, we got curious and reached out to Brigit and asked her to come on the show to give us all the details.

Justin Searls blog.testdouble.com

How to tell if AI threatens YOUR job (and 3 simple rules to keep it)

Justin Searls dives deep into whether AI tools like ChatGPT actually threaten knowledge worker jobs and provides helpful ideas around what to do about it.

Having spent months programming with GitHub Copilot, weeks talking to ChatGPT, and days searching via Bing Chat as an alternative to Google, the best description I’ve heard of AI’s capabilities is “fluent bullshit.” And after months of seeing friends “cheat” at their day jobs by having ChatGPT do their homework for them, I’ve come to a pretty grim, if obvious, realization:

The more excited someone is by the prospect of AI making their job easier, the more they should be worried.

Rust github.com

A high-throughput file client for mounting Amazon S3 buckets

With Mountpoint for Amazon S3, your applications can access objects stored in Amazon S3 through file operations like open and read. Mountpoint for Amazon S3 automatically translates these operations into S3 object API calls, giving your applications access to the elastic storage and throughput of Amazon S3 through a file interface.

Early alpha. Written in Rust by the AWS team.

Learn basementcommunity.bearblog.dev

4 things I learned after getting users

You can think, plan, design & toil away on your project/product all you want, but until you have real people using it… you’re only guessing. Here are 4 things the creator of basement community learned after picking up their first batch of real users:

  1. someone is going to abuse your site
  2. you need a performance monitoring system
  3. your SQL queries need to be optimized
  4. your users might have genius ideas

WordPress wptavern.com

Automattic acquires ActivityPub plugin for WordPress

Another win for the fediverse. Plugin developer Matthias Pfefferle (who is joining WordPress with the acquisition):

When Matt announced that Tumblr wants to implement ActivityPub on Twitter, I asked why not WordPress, so I came in contact with Automattic and they offered me the opportunity to work full time on the plugin and other Open Web projects.

The plugin lets people follow your WordPress site on ActivityPub-supporting social networks. Today it has over 2k active installs, but what would that number look like if this plugin came bundled with new installs/upgrades?

There’s very little downside for WordPress site owners to one-click install that sucker…

Go github.com

pgrok is a poor man's ngrok

A multi-tenant HTTP reverse tunnel solution through remote port forwarding from the SSH protocol.

This is intended for small teams that need to expose the local development environment to the public internet, and you need to bring your own domain name and SSO provider.

It gives stable subdomain for every user, and gated by your SSO through OIDC protocol.

Think this as a bare-bone alternative to the ngrok’s $65/user/month enterprise tier. Try to put this behind a production system will blow up your SLA.

For individuals and production systems, just buy ngrok, it is still my favorite.

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