Go Time Go Time #132

The trouble with databases

Databases are tricky, especially at scale. In this episode Mat, Jaana, and Jon discuss different types of databases, the pros and cons of each, along with the many ways developers can have issues with databases. They also explore questions like, “Why are serial IDs problematic?” and “What alternatives are there if we aren’t using serial IDs?” while at it.

Brain Science Brain Science #20

Navigating perfectionism

High expectations for performance in both life and work are common, but what do you do when you get stuck and you’re not able to achieve the results you desire? In this episode, Mireille and Adam talk through the different aspects of perfectionism and ways in which is can be adaptive and helpful and other ways in which it poses additional challenges. What happens when we avoid the possibility of failure as opposed to simply having high standards for our performance? How can we begin to focus on healthy striving as opposed to reaching for perfection?

Evan You Increment

Making Vue 3

Evan You writes up lessons learned from rewriting the next major version of Vue.js.

Two key considerations led us to the new major version (and rewrite) of Vue: First, the general availability of new JavaScript language features in mainstream browsers. Second, design and architectural issues in the current codebase that had been exposed over time.

I found the section on overcoming the bottleneck of the Virtual DOM (and decreasing CPU time by up to 90%) fascinating. ASTs FTW once again!

Tidelift Icon Tidelift – Sponsored

Take the survey, get a "pay the maintainers" t-shirt!

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Our friends at Tidelift need your help. If you develop applications using open source as part of your day job, please take 10 minutes to complete this survey today.

Here’s a few questions they’re excited to get answers to:

  • How is the recession impacting your organization’s use of open source for application development? Is it increasing or decreasing?
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  • Does your organization have policies that allow you to contribute to open source?

Take the survey and Tidelift will send you a fresh “Pay the maintainers” t-shirt for your time.

Take the survey, get a "pay the maintainers" t-shirt!

Feross Aboukhadijeh distributed.camp

Join me at Distributed Camp 2020

There are a variety of new projects working to create a healthier Web: from fighting censorship in oppressive countries, to solving pressing issues of privacy, to creating a Web entirely run by users. Come enjoy two days of immersive, hands-on workshops where you get to try out some of the latest decentralized web technologies for yourself.

And it’s free!

Lea Verou lea.verou.me

Today’s JavaScript, from an outsider’s perspective

Lea Verou shared this story of using Javascript for the first time…

Today I tried to help a friend who is a great computer scientist, but not a JS person use a JS module he found on Github. Since for the past 6 years my day job is doing usability research & teaching at MIT, I couldn’t help but cringe at the slog that this was. Lo and behold, a pile of unnecessary error conditions, cryptic errors, and lack of proper feedback. And I don’t feel I did a good job communicating the frustration he went through in the one hour or so until he gave up.

It went a bit like this…

Tobias Uhlig github.com

A UI framework that runs (almost) entirely in Web Workers

Tobias Uhlig:

Neo is based on top of ES8 and uses the latest ES features as long as they can run directly inside the browser. This is one of the major design goals: the dev mode can run inside a browser without needing any JS related builds or transpilations. Instead of using any kind of templates, persistent JSON structures are in place. The combinations of these concepts lead to a pretty amazing performance and adds new possibilities for scaling to the UI area.

I haven’t seen any benchmarks or examples where using Neo produces extreme performance, but conceptually it makes sense that moving computationally expensive things to background threads would keep your UI thread snappy.

Achiel van der Mandele Cloudflare

Cloudflare launches speed.cloudflare.com

There’s a new speed test in town…

With many people being forced to work from home, there’s increased load on consumer ISPs. You may be asking yourself: how well is my ISP performing with even more traffic? Today we’re announcing the general availability of speed.cloudflare.com, a way to gain meaningful insights into exactly how well your network is performing.

We’ve seen a massive shift from users accessing the Internet from busy office districts to spread out urban areas. Although there are a slew of speed testing tools out there, none of them give you precise insights into how they came to those measurements and how they map to real-world performance.

Cloudflare launches speed.cloudflare.com

Amazon Web Services adayinthelifeof.nl

AWS services explained in one line each

there are a lot of AWS services available. And I do mean: a LOT. Currently, there are 163 (!) different services that are available from the Amazon Dashboard, each with their own way of working, difficulties, catches and best practises.

What follows is one-line descriptions of all 163 AWS services. MSK? Kafka as a service. Amazon Connect? AWS call center platform. And so on.

Practical AI Practical AI #90

Exploring NVIDIA's Ampere & the A100 GPU

On the heels of NVIDIA’s latest announcements, Daniel and Chris explore how the new NVIDIA Ampere architecture evolves the high-performance computing (HPC) landscape for artificial intelligence. After investigating the new specifications of the NVIDIA A100 Tensor Core GPU, Chris and Daniel turn their attention to the data center with the NVIDIA DGX A100, and then finish their journey at “the edge” with the NVIDIA EGX A100 and the NVIDIA Jetson Xavier NX.

Dmitri Popov coffeecode.camera

Towards an efficient photographic workflow on Linux

Dmitri Popov:

digiKam is the cornerstone of my photographic workflow. This powerful and versatile photo management application has all the tools and features necessary for transferring, organizing, processing, and managing photos, RAW files, and videos. But even though digiKam can handle practically any photographic task you throw at it, there is still room for optimizing and improving parts of the Linux-based photographic workflow.

Matt Mullenweg ma.tt

On distributed work: gradually, then suddenly

Matt Mullenweg:

The two main theses of my professional career have been that distributed is the future of work, and that open source is the future of technology and innovation.

On the distributed front, the future of work has been arriving quickly. This week, a wave of companies representing over $800B in market capitalization announced they’re embracing distributed work beyond what’s required by the pandemic…

Change happens slowly, then all at once.

There are few people on Earth that have been thinking about this longer (and more deeply) than Matt.

Tobias Lütke Twitter

"Office centricity is over."

This thread from Tobias Lütke (CEO of Shopify) on Twitter…talks about digital by default, a unified work experience, WFH setup, empathy, company culture, change, and silver linings.

As of today, Shopify is a digital by default company. We will keep our offices closed until 2021 so that we can rework them for this new reality. And after that, most will permanently work remotely. Office centricity is over.

Until recently, work happened in the office. We’ve always had some people remote, but they used the internet as a bridge to the office. This will reverse now. The future of the office is to act as an on-ramp to the same digital workplace that you can access from your #WFH setup.

He goes on to say…

We haven’t figured this whole thing out. There is a lot of change ahead, but that is what we’re good at. “Thrive on change” is written on our (now digital) walls for a reason.

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