Go github.com

A Go backend framework for rapidly creating APIs and distributed systems

Encore uses static analysis and code generation to reduce the boilerplate you have to write, resulting in an extremely productive developer experience.

The list of superpowers is impressive, to say the least. I know gophers tend to be skittish when they’re approached by a framework, though, so I’d love to hear more about this project on Go Time

Tooling tinytools.directory

A collection of open source, experimental, tiny tools

700+ hand-selected tools across a range of categories such as writing, productivity, pixel art, and more. The headline link goes to the web interface, but you can also get at in rendered Markdown on the GitHub Repo.

Although I’ve mostly also included ‘standards’, this list has a focus on artful tools & toys that are as fun to use as they are functional.

The goal of this list is to enable making entirely outside of closed production ecosystems or walled software gardens.

Go Time Go Time #175

The ultimate guide to crafting your GopherCon proposal

The Call for Proposals for GopherCon 2021 is open from Monday, April 5th to Sunday, April 25th. Kris Brandow, an experienced GopherCon speaker, has published a series of guides to assist Gophers as they craft their proposals and think about submitting.

In this episode Kris reads through his guide, discussing the four parts with a GopherCon newbie, Angelica Hill, who spoke for the first time at GopherCon last year, and is a first time CFP reviewer this year.

O'Reilly Media Icon O'Reilly Media – Sponsored

The Manager's Path (free book chapter)

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Get Chapter 3 from The Manager’s Path free. If you’re a tech lead—or are responsible for promoting someone to fill that role—this chapter’s for you. It dives into what a tech lead does, how the job should be structured, how to manage projects, and most importantly, what makes a tech lead successful.

Oh, and that weird trick we mentioned? It’s on page 4 of this free download.

Learn a16z.com

The NFT Canon

The NFT Canon is a go-to resource for artists and creators, developers, corporations and institutions, communities and other organizations seeking to understand or do more with non-fungible tokens.

It’s a curated list of readings and resources on all things NFTs (inspired by the a16z Crypto Canon), and is organized from the big picture of what NFTs are and why they matter, to how to mint, collect, and do more with them — including various applications such as art, music, gaming, social tokens, and others.

We will continue to update this as more people try out new things, share their work, or publish resources for learning about NFTs. If you have suggestions for quality pieces to add, let us know @a16z.

A good resource and primer for our upcoming NFT episode of The Changelog with Mikeal Rogers.

JavaScript github.com

A form validation library that borrows its syntax from unit testing

You may have heard my little rant about WET form validation logic on the latest episode of The Changelog. Well maybe you didn’t, but Evyatar did. It prompted him to reach out and let me know about Vest, his declarative validation framework:

The idea behind Vest is that your validations can be described as a ‘spec’ or a contract that reflects your form or feature structure. Your validations run in production, and they are framework agnostic - meaning Vest works well with React, Angular, Vue, or even without a framework at all.

I dig the syntax! Here’s a taste:

import vest, { test } from 'vest';

export default vest.create('user_form', (data = {}, currentField) => {
  vest.only(currentField);

  test('username', 'Username is required', () => {
    enforce(data.username).isNotEmpty();
  });

  test('username', 'Username is too short', () => {
    enforce(data.username).longerThanOrEquals(3);
  });
});

Now all we need is a tool that will inspect our server-side logic and generate the equivalent Vest code. 😉

Amazon Web Services aws.amazon.com

Introducing OpenSearch (renamed from Amazon Elasticsearch Service)

From the AWS open source blog:

Today, we are introducing the OpenSearch project, a community-driven, open source fork of Elasticsearch and Kibana. We are making a long-term investment in OpenSearch to ensure users continue to have a secure, high-quality, fully open source search and analytics suite with a rich roadmap of new and innovative functionality. This project includes OpenSearch (derived from Elasticsearch 7.10.2) and OpenSearch Dashboards (derived from Kibana 7.10.2). Additionally, the OpenSearch project is the new home for our previous distribution of Elasticsearch (Open Distro for Elasticsearch), which includes features such as enterprise security, alerting, machine learning, SQL, index state management, and more. All of the software in the OpenSearch project is released under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (ALv2).

Did you listen to our epic Elastic vs AWS episode on The Changelog? I’d really love to hear from the community on this subject…is this a good thing or a bad thing for open source at large? Why didn’t AWS just work with Elasticsearch (the company)?

We plan to rename our existing Amazon Elasticsearch Service to Amazon OpenSearch Service.

Retool Icon Retool – Sponsored

The state of internal tools in 2020

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Earlier this year Retool ran a survey of developers and builders on internal tools to learn how people build and maintain their internal tooling. The survey had 310 respondents, mostly in SaaS, Finance, and Retail, and mostly from mid sized (2-500 employees) companies. This report outlines the results and insights they learned.

The tldr is internal tooling is really important, but rarely gets the time and focus they need.

Try Retool today

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

How I built an on-premises AI training testbed with Kubernetes and Kubeflow

This is part 4 in a cool series on The New Stack exploring the Kubeflow machine learning platform.

I recently built a four-node bare metal Kubernetes cluster comprising CPU and GPU hosts for all my AI experiments. Though it makes economic sense to leverage the public cloud for provisioning the infrastructure, I invested a fortune in the AI testbed that’s within my line of sight.

The author shares many insights into the choices he made while building this dream setup.

How I built an on-premises AI training testbed with Kubernetes and Kubeflow

GitHub blog.arkency.com

Disadvantages of Pull Requests

In this post, Tomas Wróbel lays out 10 potential drawbacks to the typical PR flows:

  1. More long living branches, more merge conflicts
  2. The reviewability of a change decreases with size
  3. Short feedback loop makes programming fun
  4. Reviews tend to be superficial
  5. Merging is blocked by remarks that shouldn’t be blocking
  6. It’s easier to fix than to explain the fix
  7. Developers are slower to adapt the responsibility mindset
  8. PRs discourage continuous refactoring
  9. Negative emotions and outright pathology
  10. How do you switch to branches with migrations

EFF Icon EFF

Am I FLoCed?

The EFF launched a new site you can use to see if your Chrome install is one that Google is testing FLoC on.

Google is running a Chrome “origin trial” to test out an experimental new tracking feature called Federated Learning of Cohorts (aka “FLoC”). According to Google, the trial currently affects 0.5% of users in selected regions, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, India, Indonesia, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States.

They also do a nice job describing exactly what FLoC is and what it might mean regarding your privacy online.

The Changelog The Changelog #435

The future of the web is HTML over the wire

This week we’re joined by long-time web developer Matt Patterson. Earlier this year Matt wrote an evocative article for A List Apart called The Future of Web Software Is HTML-over-WebSockets. In this episode Matt sits down with Jerod to discuss, in-detail, why he believes the future of the web is server-rendered (again) and how Ruby on Rails is well positioned to bring that future to us today.

Matt Klein changelog.com/posts

My secret to building Envoy's community

Envoy’s open source community is amazing. I looked the other day, and at least on GitHub, just from a code contribution perspective, we’re almost at 600 contributors. Which for a fairly low-level C++ project… that is freakin’ incredible. It just blows my mind. And then you look at all of the vertical products and all these other things that are built on top…

There are many factors that contributed to this success, but one thing I did early on stands out as the most important thing I could’ve done. In this post I share my secret with you.

Opensource.com Icon Opensource.com

Reasons I use the git cherry-pick command

Here is an example to help you understand the importance of cherry-picking. Suppose you have made several commits in a branch, but you realize it’s the wrong branch! What do you do now? Either you repeat all your changes in the correct branch and make a fresh commit, or you merge the branch into the correct branch. Wait, the former is too tedious, and you may not want to do the latter. So, is there a way? Yes, Git’s got you covered.

I’m a pretty big fan of cherry-pick, too. I don’t use it often, but every time I do… 👨‍🍳💋

Ops tech.channable.com

Nix is the ultimate DevOps toolkit

At Channable we use Nix to build and deploy our services and to manage our development environments. This was not always the case: in the past we used a combination of ecosystem-specific tools and custom scripts to glue them together. Consolidating everything with Nix has helped us standardize development and deployment workflows, eliminate “works on my machine”-problems, and avoid unnecessary rebuilds. In this post we want to share what problems we encountered before adopting Nix, how Nix solves those, and how we gradually introduced Nix into our workflows.

If Nix is intriguing to you, you’re going to love an upcoming episode of The Changelog. 😉

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