The Changelog The Changelog #406

Making Windows Terminal awesome

Kayla Cinnamon, Program Manager at Microsoft for Windows Terminal, Console, Command Line, and Cascadia Code joined us to talk about the release of Windows Terminal 1.0 and the new Windows command-line experience. We talk about everything that went into rethinking the command line experience on Windows, the UX and UI design behind it all, the learnings of working in open source, and what’s to come for the Windows command line experience.

DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

Can Kubernetes solve all your infrastructure woes?

logged by @logbot permalink

It’s a Kubernetes world out there, with the vast majority of developers and organizations using the popular container orchestration engine in production. But is Kubernetes a one-size-fits-all solution? When does it make sense to adopt and implement Kubernetes, or say, skip it? This talk from Saurabh Gupta discusses real-world scenarios that demonstrate both. At the end of this talk, you’ll be able to determine whether Kubernetes is the right solution for you based on your technical stack, architecture, and automation toolchain.

What will you learn? The benefits of Kubernetes. When to use a Kubernetes-based solution. When not to use Kubernetes.

Who is this talk designed for? Anyone who wants to know if Kubernetes is the right solution for their specific use case.

Founders Talk Founders Talk #72

Slow and steady wins

Jeff Sheldon is the founder and creator of Ugmonk. Jeff is a designer by trade, and an entrepreneur by accident. I been following Jeff’s journey for the better part of Ugmonk’s existence. I’m also a customer. Jeff and I hold several similar values near and dear to our hearts. In addition to my appreciation for Jeff’s product design abilities, and how he leads his business, I also appreciate Jeff’s awareness and focus on the long hard path.

Adam Wathan adamwathan.me

How Tailwind CSS became a multi-million dollar business

Adam Wathan shares the backstory of Tailwind CSS, from humble beginnings to a multi-million dollar business. Thankfully, if you read the story, Nathan hated Sass enough to do something about it. Sometimes changes to our tools force us to change as well, and that change JUST MIGHT lead to scratching a multi-million dollar itch.

We’re also about to cross $2 million in revenue from Tailwind UI, our first commercial Tailwind CSS product which was released about 5 months ago — a bit under two years after the very first Tailwind CSS release.

Here’s the story from the beginning, while it’s still fresh enough to remember…

Gatsby Icon Gatsby – Sponsored

Become a Gatsby partner and accelerate your business 📈

logged by @logbot permalink

This is a great opportunity if you build sites for clients. Here’s what Brian Webster of Delicious Simplicity had to say about Gatsby’s partnership program:

Partnering with Gatsby has been a game changer for our business. We’re able to exceed customer expectations, bring in new business, and delight our developers.

Give your clients confidence as a Gatsby certified partner. Get started today.

Dropbox Tech Blog Icon Dropbox Tech Blog

How we migrated Dropbox from Nginx to Envoy

In this blogpost we’ll talk about the old Nginx-based traffic infrastructure, its pain points, and the benefits we gained by migrating to Envoy. We’ll compare Nginx to Envoy across many software engineering and operational dimensions. We’ll also briefly touch on the migration process, its current state, and some of the problems encountered on the way.

Envoy, for the uninitiated, is a proxy server “designed for cloud-native applications”. It was created by Lyft and used by a lot of big players in the cloud/services world.

Not only is this article interesting as a “switching” story, it’s also fascinating because of the scale of the migration:

When we moved most of Dropbox traffic to Envoy, we had to seamlessly migrate a system that already handles tens of millions of open connections, millions of requests per second, and terabits of bandwidth.

High stakes!

John D. Cook johndcook.com

The worst tool for the job

John D. Cook:

I don’t recall where I read this, but someone recommended that if you need a tool, buy the cheapest one you can find. If it’s inadequate, or breaks, or you use it a lot, then buy the best one you can afford.

If you follow this strategy, you’ll sometimes waste a little money by buying a cheap tool before buying a good one. But you won’t waste money buying expensive tools that you rarely use. And you won’t waste money by buying a sequence of incrementally better tools until you finally buy a good one.

What follows is an application of that idea to software tools.

GitHub github.com

GitHub's public roadmap

Two days ago on this repo appeared on the top starred repositories first timers list on Changelog Nightly

In this repository, you can find the official GitHub public product roadmap. Our product roadmap is where you can learn about what features we’re working on, what stage they’re in, and when we expect to bring them to you.

The roadmap repository is for communicating GitHub’s roadmap. Existing issues are currently read-only, and we are locking conversations, as we get started. Interaction limits are also in place to ensure issues originate from GitHub. We’re planning to iterate on the format of the roadmap itself, and we see potential to engage more in discussions about the future of GitHub products and features.

WFH seanblanda.com

Our remote work future is going to suck

This the first majorly bearish case I’ve read on remote work:

… remote work makes you vulnerable to outsourcing, reduces your job to a metric, creates frustrating change-averse bureaucracies, and stifles your career growth. The lack of scrutiny our remote future faces is going to result in frustrated workers and ineffective companies.

Let’s tackle these issues one at a time.

Node.js github.com

A lightweight and powerful wiki app built on Node

I’m not sure what makes this lightweight (their word, not mine), but it does load pretty fast from where I’m accessing it. I definitely see what they mean by powerful, though, as wiki.js boasts many features: multiple editors, multiple auth schemes, search functions, comments, multiple locales, the list goes on…

The demo is worth a thousand words.

JavaScript github.com

A tiny JS library for keybindings

Yes, you can do keybindings directly. But for a mere ~400 bytes you can do keybindings like this instead:

import tinykeys from "tinykeys"

tinykeys(window, {
  "Shift+D": () => {
    alert("The 'Shift' and 'd' keys were pressed at the same time")
  },
  "y e e t": () => {
    alert("The keys 'y', 'e', 'e', and 't' were pressed in order")
  },
  "$mod+KeyD": () => {
    alert("Either 'Control+d' or 'Meta+d' were pressed")
  },
})

Apple github.com

A virtual Apple Macintosh with System 8 (running in Electron)

First things first… does it actually work?!

Yes! Quite well, actually - on macOS, Windows, and Linux. Bear in mind that this is written entirely in JavaScript, so please adjust your expectations. The virtual machine is emulating a 1991 Macintosh Quadra 900 with a Motorola CPU, which Apple used before switching to IBM’s PowerPC architecture in the late 1990s.

Ok, cool. Does it run my favorite game?!

The short answer is “Yes”. In fact, you’ll find various games and demos preinstalled, thanks to an old MacWorld Demo CD from 1997. Namely, Oregon Trail, Duke Nukem 3D, Civilization II, Alley 19 Bowling, Damage Incorporated, and Dungeons & Dragons.

There are also various apps and trials preinstalled, including Photoshop 3, Premiere 4, Illustrator 5.5, StuffIt Expander, the Apple Web Page Construction Kit, and more.

A virtual Apple Macintosh with System 8 (running in Electron)
0:00 / 0:00