Kubernetes github.com

K9s makes K8s look gooood ✨

We’ve linked K9s up in the past, but I’ve been playing with it today and I just had to share it again. Gerhard has us up and running on LKE (more on that coming to the blog and podcast soon) so I’ve had a chance to kick the tires a bit.

I have no idea how any of this magic works, but I do know that I like it and I’m excited to learn more. Here’s a screen grab of its Pulses feature, which gives you an overview of your entire cluster.

K9s makes K8s look gooood ✨

Databases github.com

Graviton is like ZFS for key-value stores

Graviton Database is simple, fast, versioned, authenticated, embeddable key-value store database in pure Go… Every write is tracked, versioned and authenticated with cryptographic proofs. Additionally it is possible to take snapshots of database. Also it is possible to use simple copy,rsync commands for database backup even during live updates without any possibilities of database corruption.

Still in Alpha, but a lot of work has been done and there are features a-plenty.

Increment Icon Increment

What the history of HTTP status codes can tell us about the future of APIs

Darius Kazemi writing in Issue #14 of Increment magazine:

HTTP status codes are largely an accident of history. The people who came up with them didn’t plan on defining a numerical namespace that would last half a century or work its way into popular culture. You see this pattern over and over in the history of technology.

Because technology isn’t immune to historical contingency, it’s important for us as engineers to remember that long-lasting technical inflection points can occur at any time. Sometimes we know these decisions are important when we’re making them. Other times, they seem perfectly trivial.

Heroku Icon Heroku – Sponsored

🎧 Processing large datasets with Python

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Python is familiar to most developers as a high-level scripting language that’s popular in scientific communities. But some of its main benefits include the data processing ecosystem that’s been built around it. In particular, the machine learning communities, coupled with its lightweight asynchronous frameworks, have brought a new interest in how Python works with massive datasets.

J.T. Wolohan, the author of “Mastering Large Datasets with Python,” joined Greg Nokes, Master Technical Architect at Heroku, to talk about the application of Python and massive datasets.

Bonus — they share a 40% discount code for J.T.’s book!

The Changelog The Changelog #411

Inside GitHub's Arctic Code Vault

Earlier this year on February 2nd, 2020 Jon Evans and his team of archivists took a snapshot of all active public repositories on GitHub and sent it to a decommissioned coal mine in the Svalbard archipelago where it will be stored for the next 1,000 years.

On this episode, Jon chats with Jerod all about the GitHub Archive Program and how they’re preserving open source software for future generations.

Tieshun Roquerre tieshunroquerre.com

What I learned going through YC as a 17 year old

In addition to everything else shared, I really appreciate what Tieshun has to say about failure and how it’s acceptable in this post.

My company ultimately didn’t succeed (we realized we needed to build a services business more than a technology business and that’s not what we set out to do), and that was entirely okay. Most YC companies fail and it’s baked into their business model — YC partners were even willing to fund my next business. This surprised me because school trained me to avoid failure at all costs — a single bad grade could tarnish my GPA permanently. The consensus goal was to get the right grades and internships to build a good resume, without any gaps that could tarnish the record.

Silicon Valley’s willingness to embrace failure is unintuitive but entirely logical. Startups aren’t like school because there’s no guaranteed playbook for starting a successful company — you need good execution but also experimentation and luck.

DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

Can Kubernetes solve all your infrastructure woes?

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It’s a Kubernetes world out there, with the vast majority of developers and organizations using the popular container orchestration engine in production. But is Kubernetes a one-size-fits-all solution? When does it make sense to adopt and implement Kubernetes, or say, skip it? This talk from Saurabh Gupta discusses real-world scenarios that demonstrate both. At the end of this talk, you’ll be able to determine whether Kubernetes is the right solution for you based on your technical stack, architecture, and automation toolchain.

What will you learn? The benefits of Kubernetes. When to use a Kubernetes-based solution. When not to use Kubernetes.

Who is this talk designed for? Anyone who wants to know if Kubernetes is the right solution for their specific use case.

Antoni Kepinski github.com

Fast & lightweight (157 bytes) date formatting for Node and the browser

After searching for a fast and lightweight universal date formatting library, I’ve decided to create my own! I managed to include the most common features in just 157 bytes. The thing is also more than 2 times faster than Moment’s format and 3,5 times faster than date-fns lightFormat. 😃

Formatting patterns are compliant with Unicode Technical Standard #35.

While only a basic set of features is included with the format function, I added an additional localeFormat for locale-based formatting (such as month names). I’m planning on extending the package in the future to potentially include string escape mechanism and time-zone formatting.

The Changelog The Changelog #406

Making Windows Terminal awesome

Kayla Cinnamon, Program Manager at Microsoft for Windows Terminal, Console, Command Line, and Cascadia Code joined us to talk about the release of Windows Terminal 1.0 and the new Windows command-line experience. We talk about everything that went into rethinking the command line experience on Windows, the UX and UI design behind it all, the learnings of working in open source, and what’s to come for the Windows command line experience.

Andrzej Krzywda blog.arkency.com

An anti-if "framework"

Andrzej Krzywda:

My goal is to help you improve the design of the if/else based codebases. Yes, that probably means creating new method, extracting new object. It might be a bit OOP. If that’s not your taste and you’re fine with if/else then this may not be for you.

He then goes on to refactor a deeply nested Ruby method by extracting some classes that are responsible for their own behavior. This is perhaps a bit rudimentary to long-time OOP folks, but I see a lot of code out there looking like Andrzej’s example method so there’s plenty of people who would benefit from understanding this concept.

Terminal github.com

What's new in htop 3

Everyone’s (or at least my) favorite system monitoring tool is still alive and kickin’ with a big 3.0 release. In addition to a new display option to show CPU frequency in CPU meters, optional vim key mapping mode, and many other goodies, the big news is this:

New maintainers - after a prolonged period of inactivity from Hisham, the creator and original maintainer, a team of community maintainers have volunteered to take over a fork at htop.dev and github.com/htop-dev to keep the project going.

Open source FTW!

More good news: Hisham has agreed to join us on Maintainer Spotlight!

Arpit Bhayani arpitbhayani.me

Building finite state machines with Python Coroutines

An excellent, deep primer on both FSMs and using Coroutines in Python.

Even though this may not be the most efficient way to implement and build FSM but it is the most intuitive way indeed. The edges and state transitions, translate well into if and elif statements or the decision functions, while each state is being modeled as an independent coroutine and we still do things in a sequential manner. The entire execution is like a relay race where the baton of execution is being passed from one coroutine to another.

Craig Mod github.com

Craigstarter lets you do crowdfunding built on Shopify

The why of the project from Craig Mod is what’s interesting…

Kickstarter is an excellent way to run a crowdfunding campaign. But if you already have a community built up, and have communication channels in place (via a newsletter, for example), and already run an online shop, then Kickstarter can be unnecessarily cumbersome. Kickstarter’s 10% fee is also quite hefty. By leaning on Shopify’s flexible Liquid templating system and reasonable CC processing fees, an independent publisher running a campaign can save some ~$7,000 for every $100,000 of sales by using Craigstarter instead of Kickstarter. That’s materially meaningful, especially in the world of books.

There’s also a step-by-step walkthrough on setting things up here ~> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXP9iKARaYY

Tom Larkworthy observablehq.com

Most favorited Hacker News posts of all time

Thanks to Tom Larkworthy for putting together this “goldmine of tech resources.” The cool thing is you can play with the data yourself and make your own analysis.

The most favorited articles by the top 10k most active Hacker News members. The list skews toward innovative learning resources and tech career tips, but there is a little of everything.

Data was scraped 2020-09-1 from the public favourites lists. This is an observable notebook with the data attached as a file, so you can fork your own analysis if you don’t like how I did it (e.g. you could find the favorited Ask HN posts).

To calculate the top favourites, I give each member 30 votes to divided over their (max) 30 most recent favourited articles. I sum the votes over all articles. The results are a goldmine of tech resources.

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