Chrome Icon

Chrome

Chrome is a fast, secure, and free web browser, built for the modern web by Google.
18 Stories
All Topics

Gervasio Marchand g3rv4.com

Want a secure browser? Disable your extensions

Gervasio Marchand: While working on Taut (aka BetterSlack) I noticed that a browser extension could do lots and lots of harm. On this article, I explain how the only way to browse safely is to completely avoid them (or to be really really involved in managing them). If you're thinking, "But open source!" click through and see what Gervasio has to say about that. He also includes some examples of extensions that went rogue or were hacked and how one could abuse the system.

read more...

Paul Kinlan blog.chromium.org

A 10 year retrospective on the open web

On the Chromium Blog, Paul Kinlan shared a look back to the beginning of Chrome in 2008, the early days of the web, on through to today and the future of the "capable web." 2008-2014 — In just seven years, the web changed drastically. Browsers got significantly faster and more capable, letting developers build richer experiences on the desktop. Users started to consume even more content on mobile, meaning we all had to rethink how our experiences would work across devices and form-factors, even when the user had no connectivity. If you're looking for some perspective on how far we've come with the web and the impact of iteration — you should check this out. BTW — Chrome turned 10, here's what's new.

read more...

Gervasio Marchand g3rv4.com

Making Slack better with BetterSlack

Does BetterSlack make Slack better? ...there are 2 or 3 things about Slack I think can be made better. That’s why I built BetterSlack. It’s a Chrome extension that injects javascript into your Slack environments to add (or remove) features. Hide certain users, generate hangout links, move reactions to the right, threads on channel by default, hide status emojis ... Gervasio has a 3 minute demo to explain things in more detail...

read more...

Sam Thorogood DEV.to

Shipping PWAs as Chrome extensions

Have you considered using a PWA to create a Chrome extension? Sam Thorogood writes on Dev.to: So you've built a PWA, created your service worker, and followed all the guides. In my case, that is Emojityper: a simple PWA where you can enter words, and receive emoji. This is perfect for desktop and entering emoji in editors that don't support them. But once you've built this great experience, you're not limited to distributing it only on "the web". In this post, I'm going to detail how I shipped Emojityper as a Chrome extension, accessible via a browser action.

read more...

Chrome blog.google

HTTP 'not secure'

Chrome security has reached a milestone — Chrome will now mark http as “not secure”. Nearly two years ago, we announced that Chrome would eventually mark all sites that are not encrypted with HTTPS as “not secure”. This makes it easier to know whether your personal information is safe as it travels across the web, whether you’re checking your bank account or buying concert tickets. Starting today, we’re rolling out these changes to all Chrome users. Also, check out this episode of HTTP203 with Emily Schechter (Product Manager on the Chrome Security team)

read more...

Node.js github.com

An improved debugging experience for Node, enabled by Chrome DevTools

The big question with tools like these is, what can I do with it? Child processes are detected and attached to. You can place breakpoints before the modules are required. You can edit your files within the UI. On Ctrl-S/Cmd-S, DevTools will save the changes to disk. By default, ndb blackboxes all scripts outside current working directory to improve focus. And more.

read more...

Chrome waytab.io

Get a random item you've liked/bookmarked when you open a new browser tab

Waytab connects to your browser bookmark, Github, Twitter, Pocket, Pinterest and Unsplash account to remind you of your stars, likes and bookmarks every time you open a new browser tab. This looks like a good idea, well executed. I've long given up on bookmarking, liking, and starring stuff because I never go back and revisit. Waytab changes all that.

read more...

Paul Kinlan paul.kinlan.me

Use `onappinstalled` to know when your PWA gets installed

Paul Kinlan, developer advocate for Chrome and the open web at Google writes: Chrome implemented window.onappinstalled event. It's triggered when a user installs a progressive web app via the Add to Homescreen API or now more importantly via the manual method of Add to Homescreen. This is a very useful addition because it allows you to see engagement on the prompt vs people who use the system banners or menu buttons to install a progressive web app. Now you can track your PWA's install engagement based on the method of install — via the prompt or manually via a custom prompt. Read the docs for more details. Also, make sure you subscribe to JS Party to hear discussions about PWAs and the web platform.

read more...

AMP amphtml.wordpress.com

Improving URLs for AMP Pages

The #1 feature for AMP? Fix the URLs. Malte Ubl: Search can take advantage of privacy-preserving preloading and the performance of Google’s servers, while URLs remain as the publisher intended and the primary security context of the web, the origin, remains intact. We’re super excited about getting this work under way and we expect the changes to first reach users in the second half of 2018. Basically, this will ship by the end of 2018.

read more...
0:00 / 0:00