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JavaScript v2.parceljs.org

Parcel 2 is getting a 10x compiler speedup (thanks, Rust!)

The Parcel team is excited to release Parcel 2 beta 3! This release includes a ground up rewrite of our JavaScript compiler in Rust, which improves overall build performance by up to 10x. In addition, this post will cover some other improvements we’ve made to Parcel since our last update, along with our roadmap to a stable Parcel 2 release.

A growing trend in the JS tooling world is to replace bits and pieces with Rust || Go where it makes sense and reap the performance benefits. Congrats to the Parcel team on epic results from this rewriting effort.

Parcel 2 is getting a 10x compiler speedup (thanks, Rust!)

Node.js github.com

google/zx – a tool for writing better scripts

Bash is great, but when it comes to writing scripts, people usually choose a more convenient programming language. JavaScript is a perfect choice, but standard Node.js library requires additional hassle before using. zx package provides useful wrappers around child_process, escapes arguments and gives sensible defaults.

I wouldn’t say JavaScript is a perfect choice for this kind of scripting, but it’s definitely a suitable one (especially if it’s the language you already know well). Here’s what scripting looks like with zx:

#!/usr/bin/env zx

await $`cat package.json | grep name`

let branch = await $`git branch --show-current`
await $`dep deploy --branch=${branch}`

await Promise.all([
  $`sleep 1; echo 1`,
  $`sleep 2; echo 2`,
  $`sleep 3; echo 3`,
])

let name = 'foo bar'
await $`mkdir /tmp/${name}`

Top-level await sure makes things nicer. (Deno supports this out of the box, btw.)

Tooling sli.dev

Slidev – presentation slides for developers

The motivation for building Slidev:

I always found myself spending too much time styling and layouting slides when using apps like PowerPoint / Keynote / Google Slides. Whenever I need to share code snippets, I would also need to use other tools to generate the highlighted code as images over and over again.

So as a frontend developer, why not solve it the way that fits better with what I am good at?

Looks slick: themeable, hackable, and you write your slides in Markdown. 👌

Music github.com

An algorithmic human-computer techno jam

The music you hear is generated in your browser by a randomised algorithm, below you can see the notes and parameters that are currently in use. You can also interact with various parameters and buttons manually. The green autopilot switches change how automatic playback is. Leave them on for a lean-back experience. Buttons labelled ⟳ will generate new patterns. Source Code is on GitHub.

Bangin’

An algorithmic human-computer techno jam

JavaScript github.com

A form validation library that borrows its syntax from unit testing

You may have heard my little rant about WET form validation logic on the latest episode of The Changelog. Well maybe you didn’t, but Evyatar did. It prompted him to reach out and let me know about Vest, his declarative validation framework:

The idea behind Vest is that your validations can be described as a ‘spec’ or a contract that reflects your form or feature structure. Your validations run in production, and they are framework agnostic - meaning Vest works well with React, Angular, Vue, or even without a framework at all.

I dig the syntax! Here’s a taste:

import vest, { test } from 'vest';

export default vest.create('user_form', (data = {}, currentField) => {
  vest.only(currentField);

  test('username', 'Username is required', () => {
    enforce(data.username).isNotEmpty();
  });

  test('username', 'Username is too short', () => {
    enforce(data.username).longerThanOrEquals(3);
  });
});

Now all we need is a tool that will inspect our server-side logic and generate the equivalent Vest code. 😉

The Changelog The Changelog #435

The future of the web is HTML over the wire

This week we’re joined by long-time web developer Matt Patterson. Earlier this year Matt wrote an evocative article for A List Apart called The Future of Web Software Is HTML-over-WebSockets. In this episode Matt sits down with Jerod to discuss, in-detail, why he believes the future of the web is server-rendered (again) and how Ruby on Rails is well positioned to bring that future to us today.

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