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JavaScript

JavaScript is an object-oriented programming language used alongside HTML and CSS to give functionality to web pages.
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Chris Coyier CSS-Tricks

Using Netlify functions to send emails with a JAMstack-style site

How do you send email from a JAMstack-style site? Chris Coyer writes on CSS-Tricks: Let’s say you’re rocking a JAMstack-style site (no server-side languages in use), but you want to do something rather dynamic like send an email. Not a problem! That’s the whole point of JAMstack. It’s not just static hosting. It’s that plus doing anything else you wanna do through JavaScript and APIs. Here’s the setup…

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Rich Harris svelte.dev

Svelte 3: rethinking reactivity

After several months of being just days away, we are over the moon to announce the stable release of Svelte 3. This is a huge release representing hundreds of hours of work by many people in the Svelte community, including invaluable feedback from beta testers who have helped shape the design every step of the way. Lots of folks (myself included) have been eagerly awaiting this release after Rich teed it up on The Changelog #332. We’d love to hear your first impressions!

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Matthew Rayfield matthewrayfield.com

Animating URLs with JavaScript and Emojis

Have fun in this rabbit hole. You can use emoji (and other graphical unicode characters) in URLs. And wow is it great. But no one seems to do it. Why? Perhaps emoji are too exotic for normie web platforms to handle? Or maybe they are avoided for fear of angering the SEO gods? Whatever the reason, the overlapping portion on the Venn diagram of “It’s Possible v.s. No One Is Doing It” is where my excitement usually lies. So I decided to put a little time into the possibilities of graphical characters in URLs. Specifically, with the possibility for animating these characters by way of some Javascript.

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Jeremy Wagner A List Apart

Responsible JavaScript (Part 1)

This pretty much sums up the point Jeremy is trying to get across with this post on A List Apart and the future parts to this story of “Responsible JavaScript.” I’m not here to kill JavaScript — Make no mistake, I have no ill will toward JavaScript. It’s given me a career and—if I’m being honest with myself—a source of enjoyment for over a decade. Like any long-term relationship, I learn more about it the more time I spend with it. It’s a mature, feature-rich language that only gets more capable and elegant with every passing year. Yet, there are times when I feel like JavaScript and I are at odds. I am critical of JavaScript. Or maybe more accurately, I’m critical of how we’ve developed a tendency to view it as a first resort to building for the web…

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Chi Wang deskgap.com

Deskgap — build cross-platform desktop apps with web technologies

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before…the difference is DeskGap leverages the operating system‘s webview instead of baking a browser in with it (like Electron). DeskGap is a framework for building cross-platform desktop apps with web technologies (JavaScript, HTML and CSS). To enable native capabilities while keeping the size down, DeskGap bundles a Node.js runtime and leaves the HTML rendering to the operating system‘s webview.

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CodeX editorjs.io

Editor.js — next generation block-style text editor

This new take on a block-style text editor from CodeX looks promising. Unlike how the common WYSIWYG editor produces raw HTML markup with both content data and content appearance, Editor.js outputs a JSON object with the data of each block of content. Here’s an example of how this news item would look. { "time": 1554306305, "blocks": [ { "type": "header", "data": { "text": "Editor.js — next generation block-style text editor", "level": 1 } }, { "type": "paragraph", "data": { "text": "This new take on a block-style text editor looks promising. Unlike how the common WYSIWYG editor produces raw HTML markup with both content data and content appearance, Editor.js outputs a JSON object with the data of each block of content. Here's an example of how this news item would look." } }, { "type": "code", "data": { "code": "" } } ], "version": "2.12.3" }

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Swift github.com

Fuzzilli – a JavaScript engine fuzzer written in Swift

A (coverage-)guided fuzzer for dynamic language interpreters based on a custom intermediate language (“FuzzIL”) which can be mutated and translated to JavaScript. Not an official Google project, but written and maintained by Google engineer Samuel Groß. The README lays out quite a bit on the concept, implementation, and usage of the fuzzer, but there’s even more to learn in this presentation from Offensive Con 2019 and the associated master’s thesis for which the project was produced.

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Shlomo Kraus github.com

Mockshot – automatic mock generation from snapshot tests

We made a silly joke on Twitter yesterday (this is what Twitter is for, no?) about test doubles and that unfortunate moment when they inevitably surprise you. This prompted Shlomo Kraus to reach out and tell us about Mockshot. In brief: Imagine you could: Never manually write a mock again Have a guarantee that your mocks are always valid Sounds nice! It works by using Jest’s snapshot tests output to generate mocks to be used in other tests. This is purposeful coupling, which seems like it could backfire in the long-run. However, the team behind the library has been using it for over a year and are still singing its praises. For more on their experience creating and using it, read this.

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Carmen Bourlon carmalou.com

How to version your service worker cache

Carmen Bourlon, writing on her personal blog: A browser will check in with a service worker every 24 hours and re-initiate the process, but only if there are changes. You might change your app’s CSS or JavaScript, but without a change to the service worker, the browser will never go and update your service worker. And if the service worker never gets updated, the changed files will never make it to your user’s browser! Fortunately, there’s a pretty simple fix – we’ll version our cache… Thanks to Carmen for this fresh take on service workers from an offline-first point of view. If you dug this, you might want to get on the list for her book “Let’s Take This Offline” — a book about service workers with a focus on helping users without a consistent internet connection.

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