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Go Time Go Time #207

Maintenance in the open

Open Source and other source available projects have been a huge driver of progress in our industry, but building and maintaining an open source project is about a lot more than just writing the initial code and putting together a good README. On this episode of the maintenance mini-series, we’ll be discussing open source and the maintenance required to keep it going.

The Changelog The Changelog #469

Shopify's vision for the future of commerce

Today we’re joined by Ilya Grigorik to talk about Shopify’s developer preview release of Hydrogen and the preview release of Oxygen which is in early access preview with select merchants on Shopify. Hydrogen is their React framework for dynamic, contextual, and personalized e-commerce. And Oxygen is Shopify’s hosted V8 JavaScript worker runtime that leverages all of their platform with the hope of scaling millions of storefronts. We cover what developers can expect from the Hydrogen framework, Shopify’s big bet on React Server Components, the future of Shopify at scale with Hydrogen powered by Oxygen, and a world where merchants never have to think about the complexities of scaling infrastructure.

Chris Manson chris.manson.ie

It's all gravy

This is a short post by long-time open source maintainer Chris Manson about commitment to tasks in the open source world and how life always takes priority over dev.

We always need to keep in mind that most open source contributions are given from people that are opting to give up their spare time (usually for free) and the level of expectation can never come anywhere close to the sort of relationship that an employer might have with an employee or contractor.

Pairs well with Every commit is a gift. 🍷

Founders Talk Founders Talk #82

Journey to CEO, again

Today Adam is joined by Evan Kaplan, CEO of InfluxData. Evan’s journey to become the CEO was not by way of founder, in this company. Evan has founded several companies in the past, and he’s been in a CEO position for more than 22 years. But InfluxData was founded by Paul Dix, and Paul knew years ago that his role (best role?) was to lead the technical and product direction of the company, which lead him to Evan. Today we share that story as well as a glimpse into operating the business that built the defacto platform for building time series applications with deep roots in open source.

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

How to find a mentor and get started in open source

The New Stack’s Jennifer Riggins covering Kubecon+CloudNativeCon 2021:

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation has more than 138,000 contributors making over 7 million contributions to more than 100 open source projects. It’s reasonable that getting started in open source would feel overwhelming — to say the least. So how do you get started as a contributor to cloud native projects? How do you find a mentor or guide to help you along?

She draws many solid takeaways from a panel that discussed this exact topic at the event. This quote from Grafana’s Uchechukwu Obasi is spectacular:

“I think open source really changed my life,” Obasi said. “I’m African, I live in Africa, but having the opportunity to work on software that impacts millions of lives, it’s an opportunity that I never take for granted. If open source can change my life, it can change yours too.”

Nix blog.replit.com

Betting on Nix

Replit is donating $25k to the NixOS Foundation. Here’s why:

Replit has a history of betting on nascent technologies. The first version of Replit used WebAssembly long before WebAssembly found widespread adoption. We’re betting that the Nix project will improve performance across the board, sidestep a whole slew of bugs for our community, and let any Replit user build and publish programming environments.

For a primer convo on Nix, (re)visit our conversation with Domen Kozar on The Changelog.

The Changelog The Changelog #465

Oh my! Zsh.

Robby Russell is back on The Changelog after more than 10 years to catch us up on all things Oh My Zsh — a delightful, open source, community-driven framework for managing your Zshell configuration. It comes bundled with plugins, themes, and can be easily customized and contributed to, because hey, that’s how open source works. In this episode Robby gives us a glimpse into the passion and the struggle of being an open source software maintainer.

Python lukasz.langa.pl

Where does all the effort go? Looking at Python core developer activity

Łukasz Langa was tasked by the PSF to look at the state of CPython as an active software development project.

What are people working on? Which standard libraries require most work? Who are the active experts behind which libraries? Those were just some of the questions asked by the Foundation. In this post I’m looking into our Git repository history and our Github PR data to find answers.

Follow along as Łukasz explains how they gathered the data, analyzed it, and got answers to the questions above.

Zach Leatherman zachleat.com

Who pays for web frameworks?

Zach Leatherman has been considering sustainability models for Eleventy, so he surveyed the field to see what everyone else in the web framework ecosystem are doing. Check out his post for the raw data and his analysis. Here’s where he stands as of today:

I don’t have the answers. I definitely wouldn’t agree that Eleventy has figured out our sustainable monetization strategy but I do really admire the success that Vue has had solving this exact problem. I do know that I have no interest in Trend 2 (raise investment money) but I’ll continue to keep a keen eye on what other indie-framework folks are doing.

Go Time Go Time #198

The little known team that keeps Go going

Ever wonder how new features get added to the go command? Or where tools like gopls come from? Well, there’s an open team that handles just those things.

Just like the programming language itself, many of the tools that Go engineers use everyday are discussed and developed in the open. In this episode we’ll talk about this team, how it started, where it’s going, and how you can get involved.

Will McGugan github.com

Free code reviews for open source Python projects

Will McGugan is a full-stack developer and Python expert who is offering up free reviews for any/all qualifying open source projects.What a great idea/service to the community!

The reviews will focus on API design and general architection of your project with a view to making them a) more maintainable b) future proof and c) user friendly, but will avoid anything that a linter could do for you. Reviews are intended to be constructive and hopefully give advice you can act on, but are in no way a “grade”.

I won’t need to run your code to do a review and reviews aren’t intended to fix bugs.

All reviews will be public and will be published in the repo in a markdown file. An exception would be for any security issues, where I would notify you first.

Not everyone all at once, now. There’s already quite a few requests in the queue.

The Changelog The Changelog #460

The business model of open source

This week we’re joined by Adam Jacob, CEO of System Initiative and Co-Founder of Chef, about open source business models and the model he thinks is the right one to choose, his graceful exit from Chef and some of the details behind Chef’s acquisition in 2020 for $220 million…in cash, and how his perspective on open source has or has not changed as a result. Adam also shared as much stealth mode details as he could about System Initiative.

Ship It! Ship It! #19

Real-world implications of shipping many times a day

This week Emile Vauge, founder & CEO of Traefik, joins Gerhard to share a story that started as a solution to a 2000 microservices challenge, the real-world implications of shipping many times a day for years, and the difficulties of sustaining an inclusive and healthy open-source community while building a product company.

Working every day on keeping the open-source community in sync with the core team was an important lesson. The second learning was around big changes between major versions.

The journey from Travis CI to Circle CI, then to Semaphore CI and eventually GitHub Actions is an interesting one. The automation tools inspired by the Mymirca ant colony is a fascinating idea, executed well. There is more to discover in the episode.

Raj Dutt grafana.com

Grafana Labs is officially a unicorn

Grafana Labs announced a $220 million Series C investment round yesterday at a $3 billion valuation. I had Raj Dutt, CEO of Grafana Labs, on Founders Talk late last year — should I get him back on?

Congrats on the “B” Raj and team.

As with our previous rounds in 2019 and 2020, this funding will enable us to focus on accelerating the development of our open source observability platform and supporting the success of our community and our customers.

Here’s one example of how we’re pushing toward those goals: Earlier this year, we launched an “actually useful,” forever-free tier of Grafana Cloud that provides the industry’s most generous no-cost, fully managed observability stack, with 50GB of Loki logs, 10,000 series of Prometheus metrics, and 3 Grafana dashboard users included. Now, we’re adding 50GB of traces to the free plan, leveraging our Grafana Tempo OSS project, which recently became generally available for production use.

The Changelog The Changelog #455

Building software for yourself

Today we’re talking to Linus Lee about the practice of building software for yourself. Linus has several side projects we could talk about, but today’s show is focused on Linus’ dynamically typed functional programming language called Ink that he used to write his full text personal search engine called Monocle.

Linus is focused on writing software that solves his own needs, all of which is open source, to help him learn more deeply and organize the knowledge of his life.

Alex Ellis blog.alexellis.io

Building an open source marketplace for Kubernetes (2 years later)

It’s 22 months since I found myself frustrated with writing boilerplate instructions to install simple, but necessary software in every tutorial I wrote for clients and for my own open source work.

In this article post I’ll walk you through the journey of the past two years from the initial creation, through to growing the community, getting the first sponsored app and what’s next. There will be code snippets, and technical details, but there should be something for everyone as we celebrate the two year anniversary of the project.

Founders Talk Founders Talk #77

From open source to commercially viable

This week Adam is joined by Asim Aslam, the founder of Micro - a new cloud platform entirely focused on the developer experience of consuming and publishing public APIs. Asim’s journey spans many years of open source work on Micro. His sole focus right now, is evolving that work into a commercially viable business. This episode is jam-packed with stories of great timing, grit, resilence, success and failure, and, of course, lessons learned.

Ship It! Ship It! #9

What is good release engineering?

This week we talk with Jean-Sébastien Pedron, RabbitMQ and FreeBSD contributor, about the importance of good release engineering for core infrastructure. Both Jean-Sébastien and I have been part of the Core RabbitMQ team for many years now. We have built some of the biggest CI/CD pipelines (check the show notes for one example), wrote and shipped some great code together, while breaking and fixing many things in the process.

We have been wrestling with today’s topic since 2016. Jean-Sébastien has some great FreeBSD stories to share, as well as an interesting perspective on shipping graphic card drivers. Oh, and by the way, it’s probably our fault why your remote car key stopped working that afternoon. It will all make sense after you listen to this episode.

The Changelog The Changelog #448

Massive scale and ultra-resilience

This week we’re sharing a recent episode from Founders Talk that we continuously hear about from listeners. Listen and subscribe to Founders Talk at founderstalk.fm and anywhere you listen to podcasts.

On Founders Talk #75 — Adam talks with Spencer Kimball, CEO and Co-founder of Cockroach Labs — makers of CockroachDB an open source cloud-native distributed SQL database. Cockroach Labs recently raised $160 million dollars on a $2 billion dollar valuation. In this episode, Spencer shares his journey in open source, startups and entrepreneurship, and what they’re doing to build CockroachCloud to meet the needs of applications that require massive scale and ultra-resilience.

Music tenacityaudio.org

Tenacity – a FLOSS fork of Audacity

Tenacity is an easy-to-use, cross-platform multi-track audio editor/recorder for Windows, MacOS, GNU/Linux and other operating systems and is developed by a group of volunteers as open source software.

Sound familiar? Maybe because it’s a fork of the historically awesome Audacity project that promises:

no telemetry, crash reports and other shenanigans like that!

Not ringing any bells? Check out Audacity’s privacy policy changes, new CLA, and data collection attempts.

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