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Founders Talk Founders Talk #91

Fireside chat with Jack Dorsey

Adam was invited by our friends at Square to interview Jack Dorsey as part of their annual developer conference called Square Unboxed. Jack Dorsey is one of the most prolific CEOs out there — he’s a hacker turned CEO and is often working at the very edge of what’s to come (at scale). Jack is focused on what the future has to offer, he’s considered an innovator by many. He’s also a Bitcoin maximalist and has positioned himself and Block long on Bitcoin.

What you’re about to hear is the fireside chat Adam had with Jack at Square Unboxed 2022. Jack and Adam discuss the vision Square has for the developer platform and why it’s so central to the company’s strategy.

Daniel Stenberg un.curl.dev

Everything I know and learned about running and maintaining open source projects for three decades

Curl creator/maintainer Daniel Stenberg is writing a book. It’s (aptly) named: Uncurled

Because of my background and life with Open Source and probably a lot because of the relative success some of my projects have had, I frequently get questions about subjects related to maintaining Open Source. How to run a project and what makes them succeed? For a long time I have been collecting lessons from my life with Open Source into a list of advice for fellow Open Source library hackers. This document is my attempt to convert those thoughts and experiences into words.

I don’t believe it’s finished, but there’s a lot here already! Excited for this and while it’s a free to read GitBook right now, I hope it ends with some kind of physical manifestation.

Engineering at Meta Icon Engineering at Meta

Meta is transferring Jest to the OpenJS Foundation

Good for them (and us)! But what does that mean in practice?

Over the next few months, we’ll be completing the OpenJS Foundation’s incubation program checklist, including transferring the Jest domain, repo, website, and other assets to OpenJS. We’ll also be updating the code of conduct and contributor license agreement.

Additionally, as part of this move, we will be publishing a project charter and creating new governance policies that will document the process for gaining commit access, as well as our leadership selection process.

Next up: React?! A guy can dream…

Founders Talk Founders Talk #89

Leading GitLab to IPO

This week Sid Sijbrandij, Co-founder and CEO of GitLab, is back talking with Adam about all the details of their massive IPO last October 2021. To set the stage, this episode was recorded on Feb 1, 2022. During the show Adam mentioned they IPO’d at a $13B market cap, but they actually ended their opening day at approximately $15B. That’s a massive win for open source, GitLab, Sid, and the rest of the team. For loyal listeners you know we’ve had Sid on this show before, so of course we had to get him back on the show post-IPO to get all the details of this new journey.

Founders Talk Founders Talk #88

Making an open source Stripe for time

This week Peer Richelsen, Co-Founder and Co-CEO of Cal.com, joins the show to talk about building the “Stripe for Time” — with a grand mission to connect a billion people by 2031 through calendar scheduling. Cal has grown from an open-source side project to one of the fastest-growing commercial open source companies. We get into all the details — what it means to be an open source Calendly alternative, how they quantify connecting a Billion people by 2031, where there’s room for innovation in the scheduling space, and why being community first is part of their secret sauce.

The Changelog The Changelog #486

Practical ways to solve hard problems

Frank Krueger joined us to talk about solving hard problems. Earlier this year he wrote a blog post titled “Practical Guide to Solving Hard Problems,” and a lot of what he had to say really resonated with us. The premise is simple — if you have to write some code that you’re just not sure how to write…what do you do? What are the practical steps that you can take when you’re feeling stumped? Today’s show goes deep on that subject…practical ways to solve hard problems and ship your best work.

Frank has his own podcast called Merge Conflict — check it out at mergeconflict.fm.

Startups supabase.com

Should I open source my company?

Supabase CTO Ant Wilson walks through the pros & cons of open sourcing your startup and why he believes the answer to the question in the headline is (probably) “yes”

Open-sourcing Supabase ended up surprising us in many ways. Many people imagine that maintaining your business in public might be burdensome - but the opposite is true. There are many unexpected upsides that have made building Supabase - the product and the company - easier.

While some of this advice comes from our lens as a Dev Tools or PaaS company, most of it will apply to any software company.

Max Howell Medium

Something new is brewing

Max Howell, creator of Homebrew, has gone back to his notes on brew2 to apply web3 concepts to help “distribute value to open source.” He’s calling this new brew tea.

Tools like Homebrew lie beneath all development tools, assisting developers to actually get development done. We know the graph of all open source, which means we’re uniquely placed to innovate in interesting and exciting ways. This is exactly what tea will do. We’re taking our knowledge of how to make development more efficient and throwing innovations nobody has ever really considered before.

With plans to move the package registry on-chain, Max lays out the numerous benefits due to “inherent benefits of blockchain technology”:

  • Packages will be immutable (no more left-pad incidents)
  • Packages will always be available (we’ll use decentralized storage)
  • Releases will be signed by the maintainers themselves (rather than a middleman you are told you can trust)
  • Tools can be built to fundamentally verify the integrity of your app’s open source constitution
  • Token can flow through the graph

Max says “token flowing is where things get really interesting,” and goes on to say “with our system people who care about the health of the open source ecosystem buy some token and stake it.”

(Thanks to Omri Gabay for sharing this first in our community Slack)

Tooling vermaden.wordpress.com

ZFS compatibility

ZFS has become very portable in recent years of its development, supporting six (6) operating systems: FreeBSD, Illumos, Linux, MacOS, NetBSD, and Windows. But what if you wanted to create a ZPool compatible with all of them? Which options and ZFS features should you choose?

If you haven’t yet, check out The Changelog #475 where I talk with Matt Ahrens (co-founder of the ZFS project) about making the ZFS file system.

Bhupesh Varshney buttondown.email

One secret tip for first-time OSS contributors 🤫

Bhupesh Varshney:

A lot of folks looking how to get started on open source are given very generic advice on how to approach their first contribution. In this newsletter issue I share one specific actionable item.

His secret tip? Solve static analyzer issues. There, I saved you a click. Unless you’re not sure what he means by that or want his advice on how to actually get that done…

The Changelog The Changelog #482

Securing the open source supply chain

This week we’re joined by the “mad scientist” himself, Feross Aboukhadijeh…and we’re talking about the launch of Socket — the next big thing in the fight to secure and protect the open source supply chain.

While working on the frontlines of open source, Feross and team have witnessed firsthand how supply chain attacks have swept across the software community and have damaged the trust in open source. Socket turns the problem of securing open source software on its head, and asks…“What if we assume all open source may be malicious?” So, they built a system that proactively detects indicators of compromised open source packages and brings awareness to teams in real-time. We cover the whys, the hows, and what’s next for this ambitious and very much needed project.

Simon Willison simonwillison.net

Support open source that you use by paying the maintainers to talk to your team

I love this idea by Simon Willison:

I think I’ve come up with a novel hack for the challenge of getting your company to financially support the open source projects that it uses: reach out to the maintainers and offer them generous speaking fees for remote talks to your engineering team.

It won’t work for every person and situation, but we should add it to our arsenal of ways to return economic value back to the maintainers of our open source infrastructure.

JS Party JS Party #210

What's in your package.json?

Tobie Langel, Open source strategist and Principal at UnlockOpen, joins Chris, Feross, and Amal to discuss recent widespread incidents affecting the JavaScript community (and breaking CI builds) around the globe. Two widely used npm libraries were self-sabotaged by their single maintainer, yet again, highlighting the many gaps in our OSS supply chain security, sustainability and overall practices. We explore all these topics and solution on what our ecosystem needs to be more resilient to these types of attacks in the future.

Awesome Lists github.com

Open source startup alternatives to well-known SaaS products

The criteria for inclusion is as follows:

  1. Its product is strongly based on an open source repo
  2. It has a well-known closed-sourced competitor, solving a similar business problem
  3. It is a private for-profit company, founded in the last 10 years
  4. Its repo has 100+ stars on GitHub

I’m seeing lots of Changelog guests & friends in this awesome list. 😎

The Changelog The Changelog #476

Supabase is all in on Postgres

This week Paul Copplestone, CEO of Supabase joined us to catch us up on the next big thing happening in the world of Postgres. Supabase might be best known as “the open source Firebase alternative,” a tagline they might be reluctant to maintain. But from Adam’s perspective, he’s never been more excited about what they’re bringing to market for Postgres fans. In the last year, Supabase has gone from 0 to more than 80,000 databases on their platform — and they’re still in beta…and it’s open source. Hopefully today’s show sheds some light on why everyone is talking about Supabase.

The Changelog The Changelog #475

Making the ZFS file system

This week Matt Ahrens joins Adam to talk about ZFS. Matt co-founded the ZFS project at Sun Microsystems in 2001. And 20 years later Adam picked up ZFS for use in his home lab and loved it. So, he reached out to Matt and invited him on the show. They cover the origins of the file system, its journey from proprietary to open source, architecture choices like copy-on-write, the ins and outs of creating and managing ZFS, RAID-Z and RAID-Z expansion, and Matt even shares plans for ZFS in the cloud with ZFS object store.

Daniel Stenberg daniel.haxx.se

Enforcing the pyramid of open source

Daniel Stenberg lays out how he thinks we can view the world of software and open source in light of supply chain security, maintainer sustainability, and the like:

Inside the pyramid there is a hierarchy where things using software are build on top of others, in layers. The higher up you go, the more you stand on the shoulders of open source components below you.

At the very bottom of the pyramid are the foundational components. Operating systems and libraries. The stuff virtually everything runs or depends upon. The components you really don’t want to have serious security vulnerabilities.

Enforcing the pyramid of open source

JavaScript fakerjs.dev

Faker.js is now a community maintained project

Eight people have stepped up to take over maintenance of the suddenly abandoned JS library that generates fake data. These transitions are tricky to make smoothly. Props to the new team on being very careful and thoughtful each step along the way, especially when it comes to funding the project. Here’s a nice note from the new team:

We’re excited to give new life to this idea and project.

This project can have a fresh start and it will become even cooler.

We felt we needed to do a public announcement because of all of the attention the project received in the media and from the community.

We believe that we have acted in the way that is best for the community.

YouTube Icon YouTube

What really happened to Faker.js?

Fireship with a brief (3:48) rundown of the most recent instance of a popular open source library maintainer removing their code from public repositories in response to corporate (ab)use of their free labor:

Yesterday, a popular open-source package, Faker.js, was abruptly taken down from GitHub. Its readme simply said “What really happened to Aaron Swartz?”. Let’s take a look at why Open Source Software can be a bad deal for many independent developers.

Kailash Nadh nadh.in

"Open source" is not broken

A rebuttal by Kailash Nadh to the aforelinked post.

large for-profit corporations started their widespread consumption of FOSS, ever since countless “unicorns” raised infinite amounts of funding on valuations built pretty much entirely on FOSS, ever since FOSS got co-opted into corporatisation and capitalisation. And yet, countless maintainers of critical and widely used FOSS struggle to make a living.

Whose fault is this? I do not believe that this is FOSS’ fault as a conceptual framework or a system. If FOSS was broken, the internet as we know it today wouldn’t exist; the countless marvels of technology that we take for granted and techno-economies that thrive on them wouldn’t exist; millions of software developers (like me) who learnt to write code with FOSS and learnt to make a living with that knowledge wouldn’t exist.

Xe christine.website

"Open source" is broken

The post-log4j-zero-day thinkpieces started rolling in over the weekend. I’m happy about that. We need to discuss this stuff. Here’s what Christine Dodrill’s TL;DR:

If you want me to make you useful software, pay me. If you use software made by others in their spare time and find it useful, pay them. This should not be a controversial opinion. This should not be a new thing. This should already be the state of the world and it is amazingly horrible for us to have the people that make the things that make our software work at all starve and beg for donations.

The entire article is worth considering.

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