The Changelog The Changelog #489  – Pinned

Run your home on a Raspberry Pi

This week we’re joined by Mike Riley and we’re talking about his book Portable Python Projects (Running your home on a Raspberry Pi). We breakdown the details of the latest Raspberry Pi hardware, various automation ideas from the book, why Mike prefers Python for scripting on a Raspberry Pi, and of course why the Raspberry Pi makes sense for home labs concerned about data security.

Use the code PYPROJECTS to get a 35% discount on the book. That code is valid for approximately 60 days after the episode’s publish date.

Raygun Icon Raygun – Sponsored

The developer's guide to Core Web Vitals

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Core Web Vitals present developers with a new challenge and a new opportunity to improve the user experience. In this definitive guide, you’ll get best-practice advice, a proven workflow, and actionable tips to start improving Core Web Vitals today.

In 2020, Google first introduced CWV as a subset of their well-established Web Vitals initiative to simplify the complex landscape of monitoring digital experiences. Each represents a distinct facet of the user experience: content loading speed, interactivity, and visual stability. In May 2021 these were officially implemented as a ranking factor in the Google Search algorithm. This creates elevated pressure on businesses to ensure they’re meeting the standard specified by Google, or risk losing organic placements, and in turn, diminishing business and revenue.

Read it on the web or download the PDF.

Engineering at Meta Icon Engineering at Meta

Meta is transferring Jest to the OpenJS Foundation

Good for them (and us)! But what does that mean in practice?

Over the next few months, we’ll be completing the OpenJS Foundation’s incubation program checklist, including transferring the Jest domain, repo, website, and other assets to OpenJS. We’ll also be updating the code of conduct and contributor license agreement.

Additionally, as part of this move, we will be publishing a project charter and creating new governance policies that will document the process for gaining commit access, as well as our leadership selection process.

Next up: React?! A guy can dream…

Ship It! Ship It! #52

Priyanka's Happy Hour (KubeCon EU 2022)

Today we talk to Priyanka Sharma (E.D. at the Cloud Native Computing Foundation) about all things KubeCon Europe 2022. We start with Gerhard’s favourite subject - Priyanka’s Happy Hour - and then we switch focus to the conference.

For many, this will be the first in-person KubeCon since 2019. As for Gerhard, he is not sure that he remember how airports work. If he succeeds, he looks forward to meeting some of you in Valencia. If not, send help.

Career scottkennedy.us

Why I left Google: work-life balance

I love when software engineers share their career/life choices and the reasoning behind them so others can benefit from their perspective, like this one on bucket filling:

Somebody once described balance to me as three buckets filled with water. One for career, a second for physical health, and a third for social and family life. At any point, one bucket might be running low. But as long as the overall water level is high enough, things should be fine.

Scott’s choice to join a startup seems odd given his reason for leaving Google, but:

So: am I happier? Undoubtedly yes.

I work more hours. I’m more likely to be working in the evening or on the weekend now. But what I do makes a difference that I can see. Progress feels 10x faster.

Most surprising is that I have more energy. It’s easier to find motivation to get back in the gym. I have more energy in social situations.

Working more hours sounds like tipping the work/life balance in the wrong direction, but excitement about your work certainly changes the calculus. He’s happier now, so that’s great!

Chronosphere Icon Chronosphere – Sponsored

Observability platform for scaling cloud-native

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Chronosphere is the observability platform for cloud-native teams operating at scale.

When it comes to observability, teams need a reliable, scalable, and efficient solution so they can know about issues well before their customers do.

Companies born in the cloud-native era often start with Prometheus for monitoring, which is obviously an amazing piece of software, but they quickly push it to its limits and often outgrow it. They run into issues with siloed data, missing long-term storage, and wasted engineering time firefighting the monitoring system vs delivering their application with confidence.

Learn more and get a demo at chronosphere.io.

Jan Schaumann netmeister.org

If programming languages were Futurama characters

Good news, everyone! Jan Schaumann merged Futurama with your (least) favorite programming languages. Amy Wong is… Ruby?!

Object-oriented, cute, really popular, and a bit naive. Had a bit of Fry grafted onto herself for a while. Also had a thing with Bender. And Zapp. Easy going, but doesn’t do well in difficult situations, falls over easily.

Bender is Shell. Fry is Perl. If you care at all for his reasoning, you’ve already clicked through!

Founders Talk Founders Talk #89

Leading GitLab to IPO

This week Sid Sijbrandij, Co-founder and CEO of GitLab, is back talking with Adam about all the details of their massive IPO last October 2021. To set the stage, this episode was recorded on Feb 1, 2022. During the show Adam mentioned they IPO’d at a $13B market cap, but they actually ended their opening day at approximately $15B. That’s a massive win for open source, GitLab, Sid, and the rest of the team. For loyal listeners you know we’ve had Sid on this show before, so of course we had to get him back on the show post-IPO to get all the details of this new journey.

Emacs fugue.co

A CEO's guide to Emacs

Josh Stella:

For those who haven’t used Emacs, it’s something you’ll likely hate, but may love. It’s sort of a Rube Goldberg machine the size of a house that, at first glance, performs all the functions of a toaster. That hardly sounds like an endorsement, but the key phrase is “at first glance.” Once you grok Emacs, you realize that it’s a thermonuclear toaster that can also serve as the engine for… well, just about anything you want to do with text.

Clément Delangue huggingface.co

Hugging Face raised $100 million for open/collaborative machine learning

Big news from our friends at Hugging Face:

Hugging Face is now the fastest growing community & most used platform for machine learning! With 100,000 pre-trained models & 10,000 datasets hosted on the platform for NLP, computer vision, speech, time-series, biology, reinforcement learning, chemistry and more, the Hugging Face Hub has become the Home of Machine Learning to create, collaborate, and deploy state-of-the-art models.

What will they spend the money on? Good stuff:

Thanks to the new funding, we’ll be doubling down on research, open-source, products and responsible democratization of AI.

VS Code blog.dendron.so

VS Code's major Markdown tooling upgrade

Lots of cool stuff for Markdown authors in April’s VS Code release. Namely:

  • drag and drop files into the editor to create a Markdown link
  • find all references to header|links|files|urls inside of Markdown
  • rename headers|links inside Markdown (and propagate the changes)
  • rename Markdown files (and propagate to all references)

The Dendron team is excited because their primary vault hosts over 400k lines of Markdown 🤯

VS Code, and IDEs more broadly, help developers manage large code bases by making available tools to leverage and manipulate the syntax of programming languages. By shifting some of this tooling to markdown, can we do the same for large Markdown repositories?

Gui Heurich code-anth.xyz

Chunky Bacon

Gui Heurich on one of the legends of the Ruby community, _why the lucky stiff.

Through the things that he built, the way he performed, and the books that he wrote, _why makes us think about code and also about ourselves. It makes us think about ourselves as programmers. In a sense, _why was the meta-programmer, the one that generates other programmers by promoting reflexivity.

Documentation jiby.tech

Literate programming Wordle

I’ve long been fascinated by literate programming (the art of writing code as if it was a novel), but it’s been awhile since I’ve seen a good example of in practice. Here’s a good one:

I wanted to showcase the BDD-inspired low-tech solution I came up with via a toy project, demonstrating a small but significant programming task, broken down as series of design-implementation cycles.

Wordle is a perfect target: it’s a small codebase, with a half dozen features to string together into a useable game.

This story has five chapters and a satisfying conclusion:

This project was my first foray into literate programming at this scale, an attempt to bring together all the good ideas of TDD, modern Python development, Gherkin usage for requirements traceability purposes (without overly zealous extremes of Cucumber automation). All these ideas were until now scattered, implemented each without the others in different places, and this project fuses them into something I hope is more valuable than the sum of its parts.

The Changelog The Changelog #488

Mob programming deep dive

We’re talking with Woody Zuill today about all things Mob Programming. Woody leads Mob Programming workshops, he’s a speaker on agile related topics, and coaches and guides orgs interested in creating an environment where people can do their best work. We talk through it all and we even get some amazing advice from Woody’s dad. We define what Mob Programming is and why it’s so effective. Is it a rigid process or can teams flex to make it work for them? How to introduce mob programming to a team. What kind of groundwork is necessary? And of course, are mob programming’s virtues diminished by remote teams in virtual-only settings?

Rust github.com

fclones – an efficient duplicate file finder and remover

Duplicates taking up tons of space on your home NAS? fclones quickly identifies duplicates, even when there’s 10s of thousands that you’re scanning over the network:

fclones treats your data seriously. You can inspect and modify the list of duplicate files before removing them. There is also a –dry-run option that can tell you exactly what changes on the file system would be made.

Also check out the algorithm used to detect duplicates.

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