Eugen Rochko Avatar The Changelog #315  – Pinned

Join the federation?! Mastodon awaits...

We talked with Eugen Rochko, the creator of Mastodon, about where Mastodon came from the problem it aimed to solve. How it’s not exactly an alternative Twitter, although that’s its known claim to fame. Why it’s probably not going anywhere. The ins-and-outs of federation, getting started, running an instance, why would want to — cool stuff you’ve never considered could be built on top of Mastodon. And finally, the story behind naming posted content a “toot”.

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Donald Fischer Avatar Founders Talk #58

Tidelift's mission is to pay open source maintainers

Donald Fischer and the team at Tidelift are on a mission of making open source work better — for everyone. To pay the maintainers of open source software they are putting a new spin on a highly successful business model that’s a win-win for the maintainers as well as the software teams using the software. In this episode we dig into that backstory and Donald’s journey.

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Brad Armstrong Medium

How to fail as a new engineering manager

Brad Armstrong lays it all out there about how to transition from an engineer to a manager: There are decades of books and thousands of blogs dedicated to trying to answer these questions, so I‘m not here to pretend that I’ve got the secret to success. But I do know a few ways that I’m pretty sure can guarantee you’ll fail. He takes you through 8 easy steps to failure. I'll disappoint you now and spoil that step 1 is to keep coding 😱

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GoCD Icon GoCD – Sponsored

Continuous delivery for microservices blog series

If you run and deploy microservices, this blog series from the GoCD will be a great guide for you and your team as you navigate testing, feature toggles, and more. 5 considerations for continuous delivery of microservices Test strategy for microservices Trunk based development and feature toggles Environment strategy for continuous delivery of microservices Configuration strategy for continuous delivery of microservices

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CJ Chilvers cjchilvers.com

Should we stop listening to podcasts?

Betteridge's law of headlines declares: "Any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no." But first, let's see what CJ Chilvers has to say (emphasis mine): We’re just numb to the Buzzfeed-ification of podcasts, even (especially?) in outlets like NPR. Then came popular YouTuber CGPGrey (one my favorite podcasters) and his Project Cyclops. In short, this is a well-known, well-liked podcaster who is now advising people to stop listening to podcasts. He has promised to stop listening himself as well — he will only create. Nothing against any of the people involved in this article, but all of it feels like an overreaction. If you feel that a podcast is wasting your time or that it's not the quality production you want, the solution is simple: unsubscribe. You don't go and start a movement calling for everyone to stop listening to podcasts. That's just — as Jerod Santo put it when we were chatting about this story — asinine. In further irony, GCPGrey still wants you to listen to the podcast he's creating, obviously.

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Gervasio Marchand g3rv4.com

Want a secure browser? Disable your extensions

Gervasio Marchand: While working on Taut (aka BetterSlack) I noticed that a browser extension could do lots and lots of harm. On this article, I explain how the only way to browse safely is to completely avoid them (or to be really really involved in managing them). If you're thinking, "But open source!" click through and see what Gervasio has to say about that. He also includes some examples of extensions that went rogue or were hacked and how one could abuse the system.

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Nikita Prokopov tonsky.me

Software disenchantment (or, struggles with operating at 1% possible performance)

Nikita Prokopov has been programming for 15 years and has become quite frustrated with the industry’s lack of care for efficiency, simplicity, and excellence in software — to the point of depression. Only in software, it’s fine if a program runs at 1% or even 0.01% of the possible performance. Everybody just seems to be ok with it. Nikita cites some examples: ...our portable computers are thousands of times more powerful than the ones that brought man to the moon. Yet every other webpage(s) struggles to maintain a smooth 60fps scroll on the latest top-of-the-line MacBook Pro. I can comfortably play games and watch 4K videos but not scroll web pages? How is it ok? Windows 10 takes 30 minutes to update. What could it possibly be doing for that long? That much time is enough to fully format my SSD drive, download a fresh build and install it like 5 times in a row. We put virtual machines inside Linux, and then we put Docker inside virtual machines, simply because nobody was able to clean up the mess that most programs, languages, and their environment produce. We cover shit with blankets just not to deal with it. “Single binary” is still a HUGE selling point for Go, for example. No mess == success. Do you share in Nikita's position? Sure, be frustrated with performance (cause we all want, "go faster!"), but do you agree with his points beyond that? If so, read this and consider supporting him on Patreon.

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Tidelift Icon Tidelift – Sponsored

$1M available on Tidelift for open source maintainers

It's time to pay the maintainers! Tidelift now has $1M available on the platform to pay open source maintainers, with guaranteed minimum $10,000 payouts to select projects in the Javascript, Java, Python, PHP, and Ruby ecosystems. How does it work? First, someone purchases the Tidelift Subscription. Then, we scan the subscriber’s open source stack for packages and dependencies. We split up the subscription fee and use it to pay the exact packages they use. In return, subscribers can be confident that those packages are well-maintained. Tidelift provides a comprehensive picture of maintenance, security, and licensing assurances to subscribers. Package income is calculated each month based on subscriber usage. Payment is then sent to maintainers. If you are an open source maintainer and would like to get paid for your work, click here to see estimated monthly income for your package(s).

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Phoenix shift.infinite.red

Phoenix’s LiveView: client-side Elixir at last?

Darin Wilson: In his keynote at ElixirConf last week, Chris McCord announced a new feature for the Phoenix web framework that caused many jaws to hit the floor, and had the hall buzzing when the talk was over. The new feature, tentatively called “LiveView”, allows developers to add dynamic, client-side interactions to web pages, using code that runs in Elixir on the server. What exactly is a LiveView, though? We don't really know yet as this is an ongoing project and no code has been released yet. But as near as I can tell, a LiveView is lot like a React component running in a GenServer – it even has a render function! And with the EEx sigil (which I didn’t know was a thing) the code feels a lot like JSX I am unreasonably excited to see what becomes of this. 

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Yegor Bugayenko yegor256.com

Code must be clean. And clear.

Yegor applies a kitchen metaphor to code: The kitchen is clean when there is no dirt in the oven. But if its electric panel speaks French, I can’t use the kitchen. Even if it’s perfectly clean. It’s not clear how to use it—that’s why it’s useless. Sounds good to me, but how do you know if your code is actually clean and clear? He provides a heuristic: If a stranger can modify your code and fix a bug in less than an hour, it is maintainable. The entire post is well worth a read.

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Linux lore.kernel.org

Linus pulls a (refreshing) 180 on his long history of 'flippant email attacks'

I did not see this coming. Linus Torvalds, writing to the Linux Kernel mailing list: I need to change some of my behavior, and I want to apologize to the people that my personal behavior hurt and possibly drove away from kernel development entirely. I am going to take time off and get some assistance on how to understand people’s emotions and respond appropriately. Introspection is hard, especially when you don't like what you see after staring yourself in the mirror. Cheers to him for owning up to mistreating others and attempting to change. Here's hoping he follows through. 🤞

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Cloudflare Blog Icon Cloudflare Blog

Cloudflare goes interplanetary with IPFS Gateway

it's exciting to see Cloudflare bridging the gap between IPFS and the traditional web. Cloudflare’s IPFS Gateway is an easy way to access content from the InterPlanetary File System (IPFS) that doesn’t require installing and running any special software on your computer. We hope our gateway, hosted at cloudflare-ipfs.com, will serve as the platform for many new highly-reliable and security-enhanced web applications. For those who want a deep dive into IPFS check out the show we did with Juan Benet – The Changelog #204.

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Emily Freeman emilyfreeman.io

Growth in fear

You should plan 10 minutes and read this story from Emily Freeman. Here are some highlights I enjoyed hearing her speak about. On growing up and being poor... Because I was poor, I was nothing. On why she's in tech... Life, in many ways, is a write-only database. On being a house-wife... I felt like a failure. I was clever, I had worked hard and yet there I was again — worth nothing. On being a mom... Giving birth was the first time I felt truly powerful. On learning... Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard.

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David Cramer Avatar Founders Talk #57

From dropout to CEO of Sentry and taking on New Relic

David dropped out of high school AND college, but that didn’t stop him. He ended up teaching himself programming and eventually landed his first job as the webmaster of a World of Warcraft community website. What a beginning… We talked through “the rough slog” period of Sentry and how David powered through to traction and enough profit for him and his partner to go full time, raise three rounds of funding, and take on New Relic.

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Miguel Michelson Martinez github.com

Stories — a self hosted Medium platform built with Ruby on Rails

Looks-wise, this is an exact design clone too. Hope that doesn't get anyone who uses this "as is" in any trouble with the real Medium. This project is a fork of a Medium clone which began as Ken Hibino's personal side project to learn Rails and React. I upgraded and refactored parts of the Rails app and integrated Dante2 wysiwyg editor. If you're looking for commentary around the project or Rails, check Hacker News.

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Amir Salihefendic blog.doist.com

What most remote companies don’t tell you about remote work

I like how this post tries to answer questions on why remote companies need to openly acknowledge the mental health challenges of remote work. Amir Salihefendic writes on Ambition & Balance from Doist: Isolation, anxiety, and depression in the remote workplace and what we’re doing about it... In contrast to a traditional office, remote work puts much more focus on output — what did you get done — rather than input — how many hours did you spend doing it. There's a sense of personal responsibility to get "enough" done that can lead people to keep themselves working long past the point of optimal productivity.

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Our podcasts

No matter who you are or where you are on your path of being a developer, we have a podcast for you. This community cares about the past, present, and future generation of developers. We're about lifting people up, not putting people down.

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