Eduards Sizovs sizovs.net

Stop learning frameworks. Learn fundamentals.

Eduards Sizovs shares advice that changed his life, how that advice helped him to remove all framework books from his bookshelf and in the process shrank his “guilt pile” of books to read from 50 to 0! Time is the most precious resource we have. Time is limited, nonrenewable and you cannot buy more of it. Technology, like fashion, is changing at the speed of light. To catch up, we need to run very fast. This race has no winners because it has no end. Fast forward to the advice part and Eduards shares this from a conversation between with his mentor… Mentor: “Technologies come and go, but it has a lot in common. Set priorities right. Invest 80% of your learning time in fundamentals. Leave 20% for frameworks, libraries and tools.”

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Mattt Thompson nshipster.com

Bundles and packages

Mattt over at NSHipster explains two important abstractions on Apple platforms: bundles and packages. Despite being distinct concepts, the terms “bundle” and “package” are frequently used interchangeably. Part of this is undoubtedly due to their similar names, but perhaps the main source of confusion is that many bundles just so happen to be packages (and vice versa). So before we go any further, let’s define our terminology: …

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Justin Jackson justinjackson.ca

Can you grow a startup on the side? Justin Jackson is trying...

In this post Justin Jackson shares his struggles, doubts, and uncertainties about where to take his startup. Sometimes we put too much financial pressure on a startup too soon and it fails — not because of lack of product/market fit, but because of financially poor choices. It’s been exciting to build and grow our app on the side. But it’s also been hard. With hundreds of paying customers, we’re dedicating more of our time to serving them. But, the business isn’t earning enough to pay us for our time. It’s been particularly challenging for me. Since 2016, I’ve supported myself with M4Devs and other courses. But my revenue’s fallen this year as I’ve dedicated more time to Transistor.

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Hired Icon Hired – Sponsored

Let top tech companies apply to you? Yes please!

Hired works with over 10,000 companies — from high growth startups to multi-national enterprise corporations to place top technical talent. They have 25,000+ job openings across disciplines in Software Engineering, DevOps, Machine Learning, Data Science and Engineering Management. How does it work? It’s easy, just create a free profile at hired.com/changelognews and sit back and relax. You control the interview process. You choose what interviews to accept. You select the job that’s right for you.

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Git lukasmestan.com

Git quick statistics

Any git repository contains a tonne of information about commits, contributors, and files. Extracting this information is not always trivial, mostly because of a gadzillion options to a gadzillion git commands – I don’t think there is a single person alive who knows them all. Probably not even Linus Torvalds himself :) Truth. Clone the repo here and make install or brew install git-quick-stats if you’re on macOS.

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Vitaly Friedman Smashing Magazine

Don’t pay to speak at commercial events

Vitaly Friedman, Editor-in-Chief and Co-founder of Smashing Magazine, breaks down the broken state of commercial web conferences saying: The state of commercial web conferences is utterly broken. What lurks behind the scenes of such events is a widely spread, toxic culture despite the hefty ticket price. And more often than not, speakers bear the burden of all of their conference-related expenses, flights, and accommodation from their own pockets. This isn’t right, and it shouldn’t be acceptable in our industry. …the general expectation is that speakers should speak for free as they’ve been given a unique opportunity to speak and that neither flights nor expenses should be covered for the very same reason. The details of this post from Vitaly go much deeper than what I’ve shared here. I highly recommend taking 22 minutes to read this.

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TensorFlow cvcompiler.com

An NLP tool for improving dev resumes

CV Compiler is an online resume analysis tool designed exclusively for software engineers. The review technology scans for keywords from the world of programming and how they are used in the resume, relative to the best practices in the industry. CV Compiler was built using Python with libraries NLTK and spaCy for tokenization, lemmatization, and POS-tagging. The internal analysis engine for large datasets (resumes, job descriptions) was built upon a Seq2Seq model in TensorFlow.

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Bryan Cantrill dtrace.org

Open source confronts its midlife crisis

This op-ed from Bryan Cantrill (CTO at Joyent) goes deep into the details around “service providers’ parasitic relationship with open source,” and the other concerns around open source makers shifting to use licenses like commons clause and others designed to restrict service providers from developing commercial products from their open source. Lots of thoughts shared around the subject and many links as well, so — get to digging.

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Adam Jacob Medium

We need sustainable free and open source communities

Adam Jacob (co-founder and creator of Chef) tldr’d his ideas to create sustainable free and open source communities by saying, “we should stop focusing on how to protect the revenue models of open source companies, and instead focus on how to create sustainable communities.” He says this will lead to better software, and that it’s also better for business. In addition to this post, Adam also wrote a short book. When I say “Sustainable Open Source Community”, I mean the following: A unified body of individuals, scattered throughout a larger society, who work in support of the creation, evolution, use, and extension of free and open source software; while ensuring its longevity through meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of the community of the future to meet its own needs.

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John Demian dashbird.io

AWS Lambda limitations explained

John Demian lays out Lambda’s runtime environment limitations for your consideration. I gave Lambda a chance to impress me after Pam Selle gave us the hard sell, but I hit up against the 5-minute function execution timeout. Needless to say I was not impressed. It’s nice to see they’ve increased that to 15 minutes, but there are other constraints to consider as well.

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Jake Archibald jakearchibald.com

What happens when packages go bad?

See what happens when a rogue evil dependency explores ways to attack the developer, server, the end user, plus other examples. Jake Archibald recently experienced a small hack (break-in) on an old website. As a thought exercise, he explored various scenarios with the kind of “powers an evil dependency could have, and what, if anything, could be done to prevent it.” Jake went on to say, … It’s been terrifying to think this through, and this is just for a static site. … For sites with a server component and database, it feels negligent to use packages you haven’t audited. With Copay, we’ve seen that attacks like this aren’t theoretical, yet the auditing task feels insurmountable.

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Victor Coisne Medium

An analysis of the Kubernetes codebase

In an attempt to confirm Kubernetes’ move beyond hype to widespread enterprise adoption, Francesc Campoy and Victor Coisne used source{d} Engine to analyze all the Kubernetes git repositories through SQL queries. Here’s a snapshot of what they learned. At its outset in 2014, the Kubernetes project had 15 programming languages, a number that quickly increased to 35 by the beginning of 2017. Given that Kubernetes came from Google, it’s not surprising to see that Go is by far the dominant language followed by Python, YAML and Markdown. The analysis shows that other languages such as Gradle and Lua have been dropped while some others like Assembly, SQL and Java made a comeback. The full results of the analysis are available upon request via a link shared at the end of the blog post.

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David Heinemeier Hansson Ruby on Rails blog

Action Mailbox for Rails 6

DHH announced on the Ruby on Rails blog the details behind Action Mailbox, the second brand new framework coming to Rails 6 (the first was Action Text). Action Mailbox routes incoming emails to controller-like mailboxes for processing in Rails. The framework was, like Action Text and Active Storage, extracted from Basecamp 3. We’ve been using a related approach to route everything from forwarded emails to email replies to messages and discussions. After extracting the ideas into Action Mailbox, we reintegrated the framework into Basecamp, and we’ve been running the code we’re sharing today for over a month in production.

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The Changelog The Changelog #327

Untangle your GitHub notifications with Octobox

Jerod is joined by Andrew Nesbitt and Ben Nickolls to talk Octobox, their open source web app that helps you manage your GitHub notifications. They discuss how Octobox came to be, why open source maintainers love it, the experiments they’re doing with pricing and business models, and how Octobox can continue to thrive despite GitHub’s renewed interest in improving notifications.

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Chris McCord dockyard.com

An update on the progress of Phoenix.LiveView

As a reminder, LiveView is an in-development feature of the Phoenix web framework that helps you create rich, interactive experiences while writing very little (ostensibly, zero) JavaScript. In Chris’ words: Phoenix LiveView is an exciting new library which enables rich, real-time user experiences with server-rendered HTML. LiveView powered applications are stateful on the server with bidrectional communication via WebSockets, offering a vastly simplified programming model compared to JavaScript alternatives. In the linked post, Chris shows a lot of examples of LiveView in action, demonstrating what it’s capable of. Here’s a feature-complete snake game, in 330 LOC, which requires zero user-land JavaScript. Impressive!

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