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JSON

JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) allows for easy interchange of data, often between a program and a database.
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JSON github.com

An interactive wrapper around `jq`

Nick Nisi shared this with me recently and it’s cool, so I thought I’d pass it along. Here’s Nick describing it:

And it is a visual wrapper around jq, that kind of does the fzf type thing where as you’re writing out your query, it’s live showing you a preview in virtual text of exactly what would get returned by what you’re querying as you go. So you can use that as a nice tool to build out your jq syntax, or your jq query, and in real time get that feedback.

The only bummer is that it’s written in Ruby. Don’t get me wrong, I love Ruby. But it requires you to have Ruby tooling on your machine to use jqq, which many people don’t have or want. BUT it’s a mere 241 lines of code, so porting it to something a little more portable shouldn’t be too much work…

Go github.com

jq but using Go instead

The second jq alternative we’ve discovered this week! (first here)

jq is hard to use. There are alternatives like fq and zq, but they still make you learn a new programming language. Im tired of learning new programming languages.

gq is not optimized for speed, flexibility or beauty. gq is optimized for minimal learning/quick usage. gq understands that you don’t use it constantly, you use it once a month and then forget about it. So when you come back to it, gq will be easy to relearn. Just use the builtin library just like you would any other go project and you’re done. No unfamiliar syntax or operations, or surprising limits. Thats it.

I don’t know if Go is a great fit for this use-case, but if you already know it well… makes sense.

JSON brimdata.io

Introducing zq: an easier (and faster) alternative to jq

If you’ve found the (excellent) jq tool for working with JSON a bit unwieldy… check out zq and see if you like its API any better. I wouldn’t put too much weight on the faster aspect, though:

We will cover zq’s performance in a future article, but to cut to the chase here, zq is almost always at least a bit faster than jq when processing JSON inputs

Almost always at least a bit faster is not something you’re likely to notice in practice.

forsigner github.com

Fomir – a schema-first library for building forms

Why create another form library? Here’s what Fomir’s author says to that:

I have tried many form libraries, like redux-form, formik, final-form, react-hook-form… None of them suit my taste. I would expect a forms library with these features:

  • Using schema
  • Easy to update form state
  • High Performance
  • More abstract

Fomir create form by passing a form schema which is a JSON tree. the form schema is very flexible, you can create any form by the schema.

I could see this as especially useful for form builders and similar tools where you’re providing a graphical way to build forms because your backend would just have to emit the correct JSON and let Fomir take it from there.

Daniel Stenberg daniel.haxx.se

Curl gets a --json flag

Daniel Stenberg’s first step toward adding first-party JSON support to everyone’s favorite command-line URL transmitter is a flag that is basically a shortcut for the following flags:

--data [arg]
--header "Content-Type: application/json"
--header "Accept: application/json"

Will more come of this? Time (and the community) will tell…

The discussion has been ignited in the curl community about what, if anything, we should do in curl to make it a smoother and better tool when working with JSON. The offered opinions range from nothing (“curl is content agnostic”) to full-fledged JSON generator, parser and pretty-printer (or a combination in between).

JSON earthly.dev

Getting to know JQ

This is a solid primer on the usefulness of jq (a lightweight, command-line JSON processor.)

In this article, I’m going to go over the basics building blocks of jq in enough depth that you will be able to understand how jq works. Of course, you still might occasionally need to head to google to find a function name or check your syntax, but at least you’ll have a firm grounding in the basics.

PostgreSQL blog.crunchydata.com

Generating JSON directly from Postgres

Too often, web tiers are full of boilerplate that does nothing except convert a result set into JSON. A middle tier could be as simple as a function call that returns JSON. All we need is an easy way to convert result sets into JSON in the database.

PostgreSQL has built-in JSON generators that can be used to create structured JSON output right in the database, upping performance and radically simplifying web tiers. Fortunately, PostgreSQL has such functions, that run right next to the data, for better performance and lower bandwidth usage.

I certainly wouldn’t advise this in many (most?) scenarios, but I can see a time and a place where “cutting out the middle man” would be quite advantageous, indeed. Keep it simple. Keep it lean.

Craig Kerstiens blog.crunchydata.com

Better JSON in Postgres with PostgreSQL 14

Craig Kerstiens:

Postgres has had “JSON” support for nearly 10 years now. I put JSON in quotes because well, 10 years ago when we announced JSON support we kinda cheated. We validated JSON was valid and then put it into a standard text field. Two years later in 2014 with Postgres 9.4 we got more proper JSON support with the JSONB datatype. My colleague @will likes to state that the B stands for better. In Postgres 14, the JSONB support is indeed getting way better.

A small but solid improvement to how you query JSONB, making it more JSON-y than ever.

Peter Ohler github.com

A journey building a fast JSON parser and full JSONPath (Oj for Go)

Peter Ohler:

I had a dream. I’d write a fast JSON parser, generic data, and a JSONPath implementation and it would be beautiful, well organized, and something to be admired. Well, reality kicked in and laughed at those dreams.

This post lays out Peter’s plan, his journey, and his lessons learned in great details. Seems like it’d pair nicely with the recent Go Time all about JSON.

Daniel Stenberg daniel.haxx.se

Curl's CLI can now write out JSON

This does not mean curl can fetch some JSON and print it to STDOUT. That would not be new. What it means is that the --write-out option now supports JSON as an output format. Pipe that output to a tool like jq and you get something like this:

{
  "url_effective": "https://example.com/",
  "http_code": 200,
  "response_code": 200,
  [lots more but I snipped them for length]
}

Which is pretty cool, if you ask me.

JSON engineering.instawork.com

When XML beats JSON

When demoing Hyperview to new engineers, there’s one comment that frequently comes up about the HXML data format:

“XML, really? It’s bloated and outdated. Why not use JSON? It’s the future.”

These comments imply that JSON is the “one true file format” that should be used for everything, but we don’t believe there’s such a thing. Each format makes tradeoffs in encoding, flexibility, and expressiveness to best suit a specific use case.

The author makes a pretty solid argument that JSON is better for lists, while XML is better for trees.

JSON github.com

JSONC is a superset of JSON which supports comments

JSON formatted files are readable to humans but the lack of comments decreases readability. With JSONC, you can use block (/* */) and single line (//) comments to describe the functionality. Microsoft VS Code also uses this format in their configuration files like settings.json, keybindings.json, launch.json, etc.

This is a Go-only implementation, but the concept is portable to any language (hint, hint).

JSONC is a superset of JSON which supports comments

JSON github.com

Free HTTP based JSON storage

A HTTP based JSON storage. It lets you store, read & modify JSON data over HTTP APIs for FREE. Ideal for small projects, prototypes or hackathons where you don’t have to spin up your own data store.

Please don’t store anything mission critical here, but like the quote above says this could be a nice option when you just need a place to temporarily dump some data you’re working with. Simply grab a BOX_ID from the homepage and then POST away:

curl -X POST 'https://jsonbox.io/$BOX_ID' \
    -H 'content-type: application/json' \
    -d '{"name": "Schrute", "position": "Assistant (to the) Regional Manager"}'

JSON json.pizza

Here, try some JSON.pizza (yes you read that correctly) 🍕

{
  "How to use": "Paste your JSON here and press Ctrl+Enter to format!",
  "Help": "Check the console for errors if it fails to parse.",
  "Themes": "Toggle dark/light theme with Ctrl+B",
  "Share": "Print a shareable URL to the console with Ctrl+L",
  "Source": "View the source on GitHub at https://github.com/kritzware/json",
  "Info": "Press Ctrl+I at anytime for a reminder of these instructions"
}

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