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Go is a programming language built to resemble a simplified version of the C programming language.
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Go github.com

Learn Go with this huge repository of examples, exercises, and quizzes

This repository contains the examples, exercises, and quizzes for my Go course: Learn Go Programming: Complete Bootcamp Course. However, even without the course, using this repository, you can learn a great deal of information about Go. Inside, there are thousands of examples, exercises and quizzes.

You’re welcome to contribute your own exercises, quizzes and wiki.

Christian Scott christianfscott.com

Making Rust as fast as Go (fake news)

Is this more proof of Cunningham’s law, which says, “The best way to get the right answer on the Internet is not to ask a question; it’s to post the wrong answer.”

Update: as some keen HN commenters have pointed out, it looks like the rust program is not actually equivalent to the go program. The go program parses the string once, while the rust program parses it repeatedly inside every loop. It’s quite late in Sydney as I write this so I’m not up for a fix right now, but this post is probably Fake News.

Read Christian’s post then have fun in the comments and discussions on HN and Reddit analyzing his hypothesis, which includes a repo of code to backup his ideas.

Go caddyserver.com

Caddy 2 is production-ready

Caddy has been around for a while, so this is a major release for the project. Hard to believe this is true today (emphasis added)

Still the only web server to use TLS automatically and by default.

Caddy 2’s new architecture was inspired by 5 years of experience with Caddy 1 and took 14 months to design. There’s a lot here, so we probably need to get the team on The Changelog or Go Time to discuss in depth.

Go Time Go Time #128

Immediate mode GUIs

Mat, Johnny and Jon are joined by Elias, creator of Gio, to discuss GUIs. Specifically, we explore the pros and cons of immediate vs retained mode and explore some examples of each, as well how some frameworks like React are attempting to bring the benefits of immediate mode to a retained mode world (the DOM).

Todd Kulesza blog.golang.org

Go developer survey 2019 results

Good news! For 2019 there were 10,975 responses to the survey — that’s almost twice as many as last year. Here are few major findings from the results, but of course, you should dig in because they make it really easy to scan and grok the details.

  • The demographics of our respondents are similar to Stack Overflow’s survey respondents, which increases our confidence that these results are representative of the larger Go developer audience.
  • A majority of respondents use Go every day, and this number has been trending up each year.
  • Respondents are using Go to solve similar problems, particularly building API/RPC services and CLIs, regardless of the size of organization they work at.
  • Most teams try to update to the latest Go release quickly; when third-party providers are late to support the current Go release, this creates an adoption blocker for developers.
  • Almost everyone in the Go ecosystem is now using modules, but some confusion around package management remains.
  • VS Code and GoLand have continued to see increased use; they’re now preferred by 3 out of 4 respondents.

Go Time Go Time #127

WebRTC in Go

The gang discusses WebRTC with Sean DuBois, creator of the Pion project and author of a pure Go WebRTC implementation. What exactly is WebRTC? Why is it so popular for video chatting? How does it work under the hood, and how does it compare with other real-time communication options?

Ilija Eftimov ieftimov.com

Understanding bytes in Go by building a TCP protocol

Ilija Eftimov:

For folks that do not have experience with lower level languages, understanding bytes and how to work with them can be challenging.

That’s why I wrote this article, taking a simple idea such as a Slack chat, turning the interactions (join/leave channel, send message to channel or user, etc) into a TCP protocol. Then I show the reader how they can implement the protocol in Go, by building a concurrent TCP server and learn more about bytes and working with bytes in the process.

I love it when people take things we do understand (like basic Slack interactions) and use them to teach us something we don’t understand (how to build a TCP protocol).

Productivity github.com

Declaratively configure your Gmail filters

If you use (and abuse) Gmail’s filters in order to wrangle your inbox, this tool might help you keep your sanity as you maintain them over time.

This utility helps you generate and maintain Gmail filters in a declarative way. It has a Jsonnet configuration file that aims to be simpler to write and maintain than using the Gmail web interface, to categorize, label, archive and manage your inbox automatically.

Go Time Go Time #123

WFH

Working from home can be challenging, especially amid school closings and everything else caused by COVID-19. In this episode panelists Jon, Mat, Carmen, and Mark share advice and experiences they have accumulated over many years of working from home. They cover separating your work space from your personal space, signaling to your family that you are busy, ways to keep track of the time, and suggestions for getting some exercise in when you can.

Go blog.golang.org

Go and the Go community during this pandemic

In this post Carmen Andoh, Russ Cox, and Steve Francia share important notes about how the pandemic is affecting the Go community, what they’re doing to help, what you can do to help, and upcoming plans for Go itself.

Go always comes second to more basic concerns like personal and family health and safety. Around the world, the past couple months have been terrible, and we are still at the start of this awful pandemic. There are days when it seems like working on anything related to Go should be considered a serious priority inversion.

But after we’ve done all we can to prepare ourselves and our families for whatever is coming, getting back to some approximation of a familiar routine and normal work is a helpful coping mechanism. In that spirit, we intend to keep working on Go and trying to help the Go community as much as we can.

Go github.com

GoTube – a very simple command line tool for downloading YouTube videos

This repository contains a single-file implementation of YouTube video downloader written in Go. It does not require any third-party packages, only built-in packages from the standard library. The code is compact and easily-readable.

Nowhere near the features of youtube-dl (which is like a swiss army knife for downloading videos off the internet), but cool nonetheless. You can read the entirety of GoTube’s source code in a single sitting, which makes it great for learning and tinkering.

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