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Go is a programming language built to resemble a simplified version of the C programming language.
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Go donatstudios.com

Go Modules have a v2+ problem

Jesse Donat:

Go has a problem. Go modules place a strange naming requirement on modules version 2 or greater. Module names on modules v2+ must end in the major version ala …/v2, and communication of this rule has been weak. It’s non-obvious, and the community at large does not understand it.

I have seen many very large projects including Google owned projects get it wrong.

I brought the issue up at my local Go meetup, and no one had ever heard about the rule. They were very skeptical the rule existed at all.

Jesse goes on to tell the history, explain the problem in-depth, and suggest next steps for the Go Community.

Go Time Go Time #146

Hits of the Summer

This episode is different than what you’re used to. We’ve been clipping highlights of the show for awhile now to share on Twitter and YouTube. A side effect of that effort is a bunch of awesome clips just sitting on Jerod’s hard drive collecting digital dust. So, here’s a beta test of a “best of” style clips show covering the summer months. Let us know if you like it!

Databases github.com

Graviton is like ZFS for key-value stores

Graviton Database is simple, fast, versioned, authenticated, embeddable key-value store database in pure Go… Every write is tracked, versioned and authenticated with cryptographic proofs. Additionally it is possible to take snapshots of database. Also it is possible to use simple copy,rsync commands for database backup even during live updates without any possibilities of database corruption.

Still in Alpha, but a lot of work has been done and there are features a-plenty.

Rob Pike opensource.googleblog.com

New case studies about Google’s use of Go

From Rob Pike on Google’s Open Source Blog:

In the past year, we’ve posted sixteen case studies from end users around the world talking about how they use Go to build fast, reliable, and efficient software at scale. Today, we are adding three new case studies from teams inside Google:

  • Core Data Solutions: Google’s Core Data team replaced a monolithic indexing pipeline written in C++ with a more flexible system of microservices, the majority of them written in Go, that help support Google Search.
  • Google Chrome: Mobile users of Google Chrome in lite mode rely on the Chrome Optimization Guide server to deliver hints for optimizing page loads of well-known sites in their geographic area. That server, written in Go, helps deliver faster page loads and lowered data usage to millions of users daily.
  • Firebase: Google Cloud customers turn to Firebase as their mobile and web hosting platform of choice. After joining Google, the team completely migrated its backend servers from Node.js to Go, for the easy concurrency and efficient execution.

Want to share your story about how your team or organization uses Go? Share your story here.

Denis Sedchenko goplay.tools

Creating a better version of The Go Playground

Greetings, Go devs!

I often find myself thinking that I often encounter a situation when I need to do some small prototyping (playing with goroutines, etc.) and Go’s playground often is a faster solution than a dedicated IDE window. Unfortunately play.golang.org is very primitive (goplay.space is better but not much), so I’ve decided to try to create something a bit better.

A few months ago I decided to try to create a better version of Go playground that will have a small valuable set of features that make prototyping comfortable enough, such as basic code autocomplete (stdlib only supported), syntax check, snippets and examples. Also as Go in WebAssembly trend starts to grow, WebAssembly support was added.

In addition, users can customize the editor by enabling font ligatures, selecting editor font, and some other small subset of options.

I would like to know your opinion and get some feedback. Source code here. Contribution is appreciated!

Go github.com

Olric lets you instantly create a fast, scalable, shared pool of RAM across a cluster of computers

Can be used as an embeddable Go library or as a language-agnostic service. Here’s their list of use cases:

With this feature set, Olric is suitable to use as a distributed cache. But it also provides distributed topics, data replication, failure detection and simple anti-entropy services. So it can be used as an ordinary key/value data store to scale your cloud application.

Patrick DeVivo askgit.com

AskGit - query your git repo with SQL

Built in Go, askgit is an open source CLI and coming soon web interface (linked above). With this tool in your toolbox, you can mine your repo for info like commit count by author on each day of the week:

SELECT
    count(*) AS commits,
    count(CASE WHEN strftime('%w',author_when)='0' THEN 1 END) AS sunday,
    count(CASE WHEN strftime('%w',author_when)='1' THEN 1 END) AS monday,
    count(CASE WHEN strftime('%w',author_when)='2' THEN 1 END) AS tuesday,
    count(CASE WHEN strftime('%w',author_when)='3' THEN 1 END) AS wednesday,
    count(CASE WHEN strftime('%w',author_when)='4' THEN 1 END) AS thursday,
    count(CASE WHEN strftime('%w',author_when)='5' THEN 1 END) AS friday,
    count(CASE WHEN strftime('%w',author_when)='6' THEN 1 END) AS saturday,
    author_email
FROM commits GROUP BY author_email ORDER BY commits

Peter Ohler github.com

A journey building a fast JSON parser and full JSONPath (Oj for Go)

Peter Ohler:

I had a dream. I’d write a fast JSON parser, generic data, and a JSONPath implementation and it would be beautiful, well organized, and something to be admired. Well, reality kicked in and laughed at those dreams.

This post lays out Peter’s plan, his journey, and his lessons learned in great details. Seems like it’d pair nicely with the recent Go Time all about JSON.

Go Time Go Time #140

The latest on Generics

Robert and Ian join us to talk about the latest updates on generics in Go. What type of feedback are they looking for as developers get their hands on tools designed to experiment with generics and Go? What was the deal with the featherweight Go paper that also discussed generics? Why can’t we use angle brackets for generics?

Raul Jordan rauljordan.com

This is why Go’s error handling is awesome

// In controllers/user.go
if err := database.CreateUser(); err != nil {
    log.Errorf("Could not create user: %v", err)
}

// In database/user.go
func CreateUser() error {
    if err := db.SQLQuery(userExistsQuery); err != nil {
        return fmt.Errorf("could not check if user already exists in db: %v", err)
    }
    ...
}

// In database/sql.go
func SQLQuery() error {
    if err := sql.Connected(); err != nil {
        return fmt.Errorf("could not establish db connection: %v", err)
    }
    ...
}

// in sql/sql.go
func Connected() error {
    if noInternet {
        return errors.New("no internet connection")
    }
    ...
}

The beauty of the code above is that each of these errors are completely namespaced by their respective function, are informative, and only handle responsibility for what they are aware of. This sort of error chaining using fmt.Errorf("something went wrong: %v", err) makes it trivial to build awesome error messages that can tell you exactly what went wrong based on how you defined it.

Patrick DeVivo github.com

Using SQL to query git repos

gitqlite is a tool for running SQL queries on git repositories. It implements SQLite virtual tables and uses go-git. It’s meant for ad-hoc querying of git repositories on disk through a common interface (SQL), as an alternative to patching together various shell commands.

Mine your repo’s history for goodies. Here’s how to get commit count by author email:

SELECT author_email, count(*) FROM commits GROUP BY author_email ORDER BY count(*) DESC
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