Pia Mancini Medium

Open Collective's new tool helps you "Back Your Stack"

Pia Mancini, CEO of Open Collective: BackYourStack is the first step to help companies discover the dependencies in their stack that are seeking to become sustainable and a way to start subscriptions to them. Each collective can set up different tiers for their subscriptions such us brand visibility, support or in-house training. Just input your GitHub org and BackYourStack will generate a list of supportable projects by analyzing your dependencies. This is a great idea and a good first step toward making it easier for organizations to put their money where their source is. (YMMV as the results are a bit limited (and maybe buggy?) at the moment. Our report is saying we only rely upon 1 open source project, which definitely doesn't cover it.)

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Rollbar Icon Rollbar – Sponsored

The guide to modern observability challenges

Our friends at Rollbar are helping the developer community learn the insights necessary not just to identify and respond to problems after their app has been deployed, but to also trace issues to their source and fix things so those problems do not recur. Check out this free guide to modern observability. In this guide, we’ll explore: Modern observability challenges and why monitoring falls short Overview of tools and techniques to help you achieve observability How to implement best practices in your systems and development process

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Katrina Owen Avatar The Changelog #309

Rebuilding Exercism from the ground up

Adam and Jerod invite back Katrina Owen after years away focusing on Exercism—a 100% free platform for code practice and mentorship with over 2500 exercises and 48 different language tracks. They talk to Katrina about how the platform has changed, the direction it's taken, the backstory on the recently launched version 2, and how she plans to turn Exercism into a sustainable business. Also, what happens if that doesn't work?!

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Eric Holmes Medium

Here's how Eric Holmes gained commit access to Homebrew in 30 minutes

This post from Eric Holmes details how package managers can be used in supply chain attacks — specifically, in this case, a supply chain attack on Homebrew — which is used by hundreds of thousands of people, including "employees at some of the biggest companies in Silicon Valley." On Jun 31st, I went in with the intention of seeing if I could gain access to Homebrew’s GitHub repositories. About 30 minutes later, I made my first commit to Homebrew/homebrew-core. If I were a malicious actor, I could have made a small, likely unnoticed change to the openssl formulae, placing a backdoor on any machine that installed it. If I can gain access to commit in 30 minutes, what could a nation state with dedicated resources achieve against a team of 17 volunteers?

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Apple github.com

How far can JavaScript take us?

Tanner Villarete asked himself, "How far can JavaScript take us?" Then answered: Turns out, pretty dang far. This web app was my attempt at mimicking Apple's iOS music app, and I think I've come pretty close! I have to admit, he did a pretty good job. The frontend is built on React and Redux. The backend? A Laravel-based API running on a Raspberry Pi! Here's the live demo, but be nice because Raspberry Pi.

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Datadog Icon Datadog – Sponsored

EC2 monitoring cheatsheet

Discover all the commands and metrics you need to monitor your EC2 instances in one place with this awesome cheatsheet from our friends at Datadog. Keep track of important resource metrics and status checks for your EC2 instances. This cheatsheet provides: Commands to run status checks and collect metrics vital to understanding overall EC2 instance performance and health Parameters and dimensions used to query EC2 statistics and filter instances by status A quick-start guide to using Datadog to collect metrics and status information to monitor AWS EC2 instances Also checkout this 3 part deep dive into the key metrics for EC2 monitoring from Maxim Brown on the Datadog engineering blog.

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Brian Krebs krebsonsecurity.com

Reddit breach highlights limits of SMS-based authentication

The cause is a 2FA fail with either SIM security or a mobile number port-out scam as the point of failure. Brian Krebs writes for KrebsOnSecurity: Of particular note is that although the Reddit employee accounts tied to the breach were protected by SMS-based two-factor authentication, the intruder(s) managed to intercept that second factor. In one common scenario, known as a SIM-swap, the attacker masquerading as the target tricks the target’s mobile provider into tying the customer’s service to a new SIM card that the bad guys control. Another typical scheme involves mobile number port-out scams, wherein the attacker impersonates a customer and requests that the customer’s mobile number be transferred to another mobile network provider. Were you exposed? ...between June 14 and 18 an attacker compromised several employee accounts at its cloud and source code hosting providers. Reddit said the exposed data included internal source code as well as email addresses and obfuscated passwords for all Reddit users who registered accounts on the site prior to May 2007. The incident also exposed the email addresses of some users who had signed up to receive daily email digests of specific discussion threads.

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Ashley Baxter Avatar Away from Keyboard #3

Ashley Baxter is excited about… insurance?

Thirteen years ago, Ashley Baxter inherited the family insurance business when her Dad passed away. Even though she's a talented photographer, and built a successful photography business, the insurance industry kept calling her name. Ashley talks about what excites her about insurance, the challenges of running a business, and how burnout forced her to focus.

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Lara Hogan larahogan.me

Lara Hogan's guide to writing a "Week in Review" doc

The important thing to remember about leading is you have to have clear lines of communication with those you lead. I love the ideas Lara shared in this guide to writing a "week in review" team update. This doc helped me set records straight, disseminate info to lots of people at once, and open up conversation internally, while reflecting on the themes that had come up in weekly one-on-ones, backchannels, team meetings, etc. What I chose to write about each time widely varied. Though the teams who reported to me were the primary audience for this doc, I kept it internally-public, meaning that anyone at the company could read and comment in it. I found that some other managers just weren’t talking about hard things that were happening...

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