Practical AI Practical AI #23

Pachyderm's Kubernetes-based infrastructure for AI

Joe Doliner (JD) joined the show to talk about productionizing ML/AI with Pachyderm, an open source data science platform built on Kubernetes (k8s). We talked through the origins of Pachyderm, challenges associated with creating infrastructure for machine learning, and data and model versioning/provenance. He also walked us through a process for going from a Jupyter notebook to a production data pipeline.

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GoCD Icon GoCD – Sponsored

Why should you use GoCD over Jenkins?

Jekins is the incumbent option, not to mention, open source. GoCD is also open source and supports Kubernetes and can be installed with Helm Charts. GoCD provides its core value out of the box. Maybe you will add a few integration plugins to make GoCD fit better in your environment. Jenkins will require many plugins to deliver value. You will need to understand the plugins, how they interoperate, and how to upgrade them. GoCD will feel more stable. Jenkins will feel more hackable. Which is a better match to your needs and philosophy? Learn how to setup your first pipeline, or check out their enterprise plugins and support.

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Hongli Lai blog.phusion.nl

Passenger 6 adds generic language support

Hongli Lai: A million apps isn’t cool. You know what is cool? A billion apps! Per overwhelming request from language communities Passenger didn’t previously cater to, we introduce generic language support in Passenger 6. Launching in 3, 2, 1… Passenger began as a Ruby application server, eventually adding support for Node.js, Python, and Meteor apps. Congrats to the relentless team at Phusion for bringing their much-beloved server to even more developer runtimes!

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Founders Talk Founders Talk #59

How $3.8M in seed funding started Gatsby as an open source company

Kyle Mathews is the founder and CEO of Gatsby, a new company he’s building around an open source project of the same name. Gatsby as a project describes itself as a flexible modern website framework and blazing fast static site generator for React.js. At the macro level — Kyle’s career has been focused on a better way to build and ship websites. It seems he’s done just that with Gatsby’s launch in late May 2015…since then he’s taken on a co-founder and a seed round of $3.8M to form Gatsby Inc.

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GitHub spectrum.chat

GitHub acquired Spectrum and every feature is now free

I’m really interested to see how this changes GitHub Issues (if at all). Really dig this sentiment shared by Bryn Jackson, CEO of Spectrum, in their announcement post: We love you all for taking a chance on Spectrum. We couldn’t be the best platform for communities without having the best communities, so we’re incredibly grateful that you’ve trusted us to take good care of you. Congrats y’all!

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Twitter Icon Twitter

"Corporate purchasing and policies make funding open source literally impossible"

This is an epic open source funding thread by @SwiftOnSecurity: Corporate purchasing and policies make funding open source Literally Impossible. Nothing’s going to change until you make them pay you.Someone filed a bug?Support contract.Someone wants a feature?Support contract.It’s literally easier to pay you $1500/yr than $25 once. Followed by: I want to donate $150 to this open source project.“Do I look like a communist? Is that what you think of me?”We need a $1.5k support contract rather than pay an on-staff developer $180k.“Okay submit their IRS W-9 and Point Of Contact for vendor management to reach out to.” That’s just the beginning. Lots to ponder if you have corporate users and you’re currently using donations as your primary source of funding.

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Hired Icon Hired – Sponsored

Let top tech companies apply to you? Yes please!

Hired works with over 10,000 companies — from high growth startups to multi-national enterprise corporations to place top technical talent. They have 25,000+ job openings across disciplines in Software Engineering, DevOps, Machine Learning, Data Science and Engineering Management. How does it work? It’s easy, just create a free profile at hired.com/changelognews and sit back and relax. You control the interview process. You choose what interviews to accept. You select the job that’s right for you.

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Rust blog.rust-lang.org

Dig in to Rust's 2018 survey results

The latest Rust user survey results are in and have been shared on the rust blog. One of the more interesting points, before digging into the data, is the survey launched for the first time in multiple languages — 14 languages total, in addition to English. The results from non-English languages totaled 25% of all responses and helped push the number of responses to a new record of 5,991 responses. I’m glad we’re getting to hear from more voices from all around the world — especially growing the response count by 25%! Also, pay attention to the comments shared about how Rust can improve. Good stuff.

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Quincy Larson freeCodeCamp

freeCodeCamp – the first BILLION minutes

Quincy Larson: People have now spent more than 1 billion minutes using freeCodeCamp. That’s the equivalent of nearly 2,000 years. To put it another way — if freeCodeCamp usage was a person, it would be old enough to have broken bread with Jesus himself. Congrats to everyone who’s helped freeCodeCamp reach this milestone! Quite an accomplishment, and just the beginning for the tiny nonprofit that’s teaching the world to code. Quincy shares a bunch of numbers in this post, including traffic comparisons between freecodecamp.org and funded startups.

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Derek Jones expressionengine.com

ExpressionEngine is now open source (open source has won)

This hits close to home — I was a heavy user/developer around ExpressionEngine from 2006-2008. I’m happy to see them come around to embrace an open source model. When Rick Ellis, founder of EllisLab, was asked on Twitter “Why open source?” he simply said: Open source has won. It’s not even a contest anymore. Here’s a note shared with us from Derek Jones, CEO of EllisLab: [ExpressionEngine] a popular commercial CMS with 15 years of continuous development has taken a huge leap and gone open source after watching the closed-source CMS market continue to shrink while simultaneously getting more crowded.

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Arun Venkatesan arun.is

Why are tech companies making custom typefaces?

The most obvious reason is cost. Developing a custom typeface can eliminate the recurring licensing fees that must be paid to foundries. IBM and Netflix claim to save millions of dollars per year by switching from Helvetica to IBM Plex and Gotham to Netflix Sans, respectively. I hadn’t considered the on going costs of licensing as a factor, but it totally make sense. Although, that’s not where Arun ends this. He goes into the much finer details of the typefaces, the medium, how screen types have changed, and more. Companies like Apple and Samsung, with their wide portfolio of digital and physical products and services, have united their brands and products under a singular typeface. Apple went further and didn’t just work within the numerous constraints posed by both the digital and physical world. In creating San Francisco, it reinvented how type is rendered altogether. I dig the question Arun ends with, “Should custom typefaces exist?”

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Practices simplabs.com

How simplabs maintains a large number of open source projects

In this blog post we will introduce you to some of out internal best practices we have developed or discovered to simplify and speed up working on open-source and other projects. There’s nothing revolutionary in here for those experienced in open source maintenance, but it’s a good rundown nonetheless. It’s also interesting to see how many teams are now using (and recommending) dependency update services such as dependabot and Greenkeeper.

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Matt Klein blog.envoyproxy.io

Envoy is now a CNCF graduated project

When we talked with Dan Kohn on The Changelog #314 about the CNCF landscape and trail map, he made it clear that graduated projects are a good first choice for adoption at each stage along the 1 through 10 trail map trail. In this case, Envoy is poised to be the “happy path” choice for 5. Service proxy, discovery, & mesh. …the CNCF projects in general somewhat represent a happy path, where we can confidently say, hey, if you choose our graduated incubating projects, we know they all work. We know that there’s real end-users adopting them. We know that there’s vendors out there who are eager to support them, your issues are gonna get responded to … it’s a pretty safe bet to engage and get invested in those communities. — Play The Changelog #314 at 1:03:48 or read the transcript

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Ire Aderinokun bitsofcode

Git aliases for lazy developers

Ire Aderinokun on her blog bitsofcode: I prefer to interface with git via the command line, at least for the simple commands. However, I’m a bit lazy, and don’t like having to repeatedly type out the same long commands multiple times a day. Over the years, I have created some short aliases that allow me to more quickly use git via the command line. Creating aliases for common commands is definitely the way to go. I do something similar in my dotfiles, except I categorize aliases by the language or technology.

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Robin Rendle CSS-Tricks

Front-end development is not a problem to be solved

Robin Rendle writing on CSS-Tricks: We should see front-end development as a unique skillset that is critical to the success of any project. I believe that’s why frameworks and tools like Bootstrap are so popular; not necessarily because they’re a collection of helpful components, but a global solution that corrects an inherent issue. … Bootstrap isn’t a skill though — front-end development is. It’s supremely ironic that front-end development is incredibly undervalued by many, yet those same people use frameworks because moving a box around in CSS is “hard.”

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Machine Learning fastcompany.com

Pentagram designed the prettiest computer chip you’ve ever seen

These IPUs (Intelligence Processing Units — a term new to me) with visual design by Pentagram for Graphcore are really pretty. Also, I think the tech may be cool but it’s a bit over my head so maybe you can tell me? Here is their brief spiel: Our IPU systems are designed to lower the cost of accelerating AI applications in cloud and enterprise datacenters to increase the performance of both training and inference by up to 100x compared to the fastest systems today.

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