Jan Schaumann netmeister.org

If programming languages were Futurama characters

Good news, everyone! Jan Schaumann merged Futurama with your (least) favorite programming languages. Amy Wong is… Ruby?!

Object-oriented, cute, really popular, and a bit naive. Had a bit of Fry grafted onto herself for a while. Also had a thing with Bender. And Zapp. Easy going, but doesn’t do well in difficult situations, falls over easily.

Bender is Shell. Fry is Perl. If you care at all for his reasoning, you’ve already clicked through!

Founders Talk Founders Talk #89

Leading GitLab to IPO

This week Sid Sijbrandij, Co-founder and CEO of GitLab, is back talking with Adam about all the details of their massive IPO last October 2021. To set the stage, this episode was recorded on Feb 1, 2022. During the show Adam mentioned they IPO’d at a $13B market cap, but they actually ended their opening day at approximately $15B. That’s a massive win for open source, GitLab, Sid, and the rest of the team. For loyal listeners you know we’ve had Sid on this show before, so of course we had to get him back on the show post-IPO to get all the details of this new journey.

Chronosphere Icon Chronosphere – Sponsored

Observability platform for scaling cloud-native

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Chronosphere is the observability platform for cloud-native teams operating at scale.

When it comes to observability, teams need a reliable, scalable, and efficient solution so they can know about issues well before their customers do.

Companies born in the cloud-native era often start with Prometheus for monitoring, which is obviously an amazing piece of software, but they quickly push it to its limits and often outgrow it. They run into issues with siloed data, missing long-term storage, and wasted engineering time firefighting the monitoring system vs delivering their application with confidence.

Learn more and get a demo at chronosphere.io.

Emacs fugue.co

A CEO's guide to Emacs

Josh Stella:

For those who haven’t used Emacs, it’s something you’ll likely hate, but may love. It’s sort of a Rube Goldberg machine the size of a house that, at first glance, performs all the functions of a toaster. That hardly sounds like an endorsement, but the key phrase is “at first glance.” Once you grok Emacs, you realize that it’s a thermonuclear toaster that can also serve as the engine for… well, just about anything you want to do with text.

Clément Delangue huggingface.co

Hugging Face raised $100 million for open/collaborative machine learning

Big news from our friends at Hugging Face:

Hugging Face is now the fastest growing community & most used platform for machine learning! With 100,000 pre-trained models & 10,000 datasets hosted on the platform for NLP, computer vision, speech, time-series, biology, reinforcement learning, chemistry and more, the Hugging Face Hub has become the Home of Machine Learning to create, collaborate, and deploy state-of-the-art models.

What will they spend the money on? Good stuff:

Thanks to the new funding, we’ll be doubling down on research, open-source, products and responsible democratization of AI.

VS Code blog.dendron.so

VS Code's major Markdown tooling upgrade

Lots of cool stuff for Markdown authors in April’s VS Code release. Namely:

  • drag and drop files into the editor to create a Markdown link
  • find all references to header|links|files|urls inside of Markdown
  • rename headers|links inside Markdown (and propagate the changes)
  • rename Markdown files (and propagate to all references)

The Dendron team is excited because their primary vault hosts over 400k lines of Markdown 🤯

VS Code, and IDEs more broadly, help developers manage large code bases by making available tools to leverage and manipulate the syntax of programming languages. By shifting some of this tooling to markdown, can we do the same for large Markdown repositories?

Gui Heurich code-anth.xyz

Chunky Bacon

Gui Heurich on one of the legends of the Ruby community, _why the lucky stiff.

Through the things that he built, the way he performed, and the books that he wrote, _why makes us think about code and also about ourselves. It makes us think about ourselves as programmers. In a sense, _why was the meta-programmer, the one that generates other programmers by promoting reflexivity.

Raygun Icon Raygun – Sponsored

The developer's guide to Core Web Vitals

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Core Web Vitals present developers with a new challenge and a new opportunity to improve the user experience. In this definitive guide, you’ll get best-practice advice, a proven workflow, and actionable tips to start improving Core Web Vitals today.

In 2020, Google first introduced CWV as a subset of their well-established Web Vitals initiative to simplify the complex landscape of monitoring digital experiences. Each represents a distinct facet of the user experience: content loading speed, interactivity, and visual stability. In May 2021 these were officially implemented as a ranking factor in the Google Search algorithm. This creates elevated pressure on businesses to ensure they’re meeting the standard specified by Google, or risk losing organic placements, and in turn, diminishing business and revenue.

Read it on the web or download the PDF.

Documentation jiby.tech

Literate programming Wordle

I’ve long been fascinated by literate programming (the art of writing code as if it was a novel), but it’s been awhile since I’ve seen a good example of in practice. Here’s a good one:

I wanted to showcase the BDD-inspired low-tech solution I came up with via a toy project, demonstrating a small but significant programming task, broken down as series of design-implementation cycles.

Wordle is a perfect target: it’s a small codebase, with a half dozen features to string together into a useable game.

This story has five chapters and a satisfying conclusion:

This project was my first foray into literate programming at this scale, an attempt to bring together all the good ideas of TDD, modern Python development, Gherkin usage for requirements traceability purposes (without overly zealous extremes of Cucumber automation). All these ideas were until now scattered, implemented each without the others in different places, and this project fuses them into something I hope is more valuable than the sum of its parts.

The Changelog The Changelog #488

Mob programming deep dive

We’re talking with Woody Zuill today about all things Mob Programming. Woody leads Mob Programming workshops, he’s a speaker on agile related topics, and coaches and guides orgs interested in creating an environment where people can do their best work. We talk through it all and we even get some amazing advice from Woody’s dad. We define what Mob Programming is and why it’s so effective. Is it a rigid process or can teams flex to make it work for them? How to introduce mob programming to a team. What kind of groundwork is necessary? And of course, are mob programming’s virtues diminished by remote teams in virtual-only settings?

Rust github.com

fclones – an efficient duplicate file finder and remover

Duplicates taking up tons of space on your home NAS? fclones quickly identifies duplicates, even when there’s 10s of thousands that you’re scanning over the network:

fclones treats your data seriously. You can inspect and modify the list of duplicate files before removing them. There is also a –dry-run option that can tell you exactly what changes on the file system would be made.

Also check out the algorithm used to detect duplicates.

JavaScript edofic.com

How i fell in love with low-js

Andraž Bajt:

Basic premise is: browsers are great at navigating pages, let’s leverage that by serving users directly with HTML. This already gives you half-decent pages but you can go further and sprinkle on some sugar. A bit of JS. Instead of reinventing the world in JS let’s try to really use what modern browsers provide natively and then push just a bit forward.

Is the pendulum starting to swing away from SPAs/client-side rendering and back toward MPAs/server-side rendering? Will we ever find balance somewhere in the middle?

The GitHub Blog Icon The GitHub Blog

GitHub will require 2FA by the end of 2023

Mike Hanley on GitHub’s blog:

The software supply chain starts with the developer. Developer accounts are frequent targets for social engineering and account takeover, and protecting developers from these types of attacks is the first and most critical step toward securing the supply chain…

Today, as part of a platform-wide effort to secure the software ecosystem through improving account security, we’re announcing that GitHub will require all users who contribute code on GitHub.com to enable one or more forms of two-factor authentication (2FA) by the end of 2023.

This is a big step in the right direction and their new(ish) 2FA for GitHub Mobile feature helps make the burden not as cumbersome as it might be otherwise.

Career johnpublic.mataroa.blog

IBM's jerk test

Some years back I applied to join IBM’s grad scheme, there was a peculiar stage to the process I’ve not seen elsewhere. It was during the onsite day, where a batch of 20 or so applicants were put through various tests in an IBM office. They called it the “group test”; around 8 of us were led to a room and asked to solve a puzzle together.

You can probably see where this story is headed… (see also)

Founders Talk Founders Talk #88

Making an open source Stripe for time

This week Peer Richelsen, Co-Founder and Co-CEO of Cal.com, joins the show to talk about building the “Stripe for Time” — with a grand mission to connect a billion people by 2031 through calendar scheduling. Cal has grown from an open-source side project to one of the fastest-growing commercial open source companies. We get into all the details — what it means to be an open source Calendly alternative, how they quantify connecting a Billion people by 2031, where there’s room for innovation in the scheduling space, and why being community first is part of their secret sauce.

Bash github.com

A collection of handy bash one-liners

Bonnie I-Man Ng:

I was working on bioinformatics a few years ago and was amazed by those single-word bash commands which are much faster than my dull scripts, time saved through learning command-line shortcuts and scripting.

Recent years I am working on cloud computing and I keep recording those useful commands here. Not all of them is oneliner, but I put effort on making them brief and swift. I am mainly using Ubuntu, Amazon Linux, RedHat, Linux Mint, Mac and CentOS, sorry if the commands don’t work on your system.

Ship It! Ship It! #51

From Kubernetes to PaaS - now what?

Today we talk to Mark Ericksen about all the things that we could be doing on the new platform - this is a follow-up to episode 50.

Mark specialises in Elixir, he hosts the Thinking Elixir podcast, and he also helps make Fly.io the best place to run Phoenix apps, such as changelog.com. In the interest of holding our new platform right, we thought that it would be a great idea to talk to someone that does this all day, every day, for many years now.

We touch up on how to run database migrations safely, and how to upgrade our application config to the latest Phoenix version. We also talked about some of the more advanced platform features that we may want to start leveraging, like the multi-region PostgreSQL.

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