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Next.js gives you the best developer experience with all the features you need for production: hybrid static & server rendering, TypeScript support, smart bundling, route pre-fetching, and more. No config needed.
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Bill Prin billprin.com

Why I ditched Django for NextJS

If you’re feeling the FOMO of JavaScript or you’re writing “spaghetti code” just to do something a NextJS component would do out of the box, then read this post from Bill Prin on why he moved from Django to NextJS.

The summary is that using a language like Python or Ruby for a significant web project has increasingly gotten less reasonable over time to the point where now, in 2022, it’s getting hard to justify. By not keeping your web stack in pure Javascript, you are making your life unnecessarily difficult (as usual, we’ll include languages like TypeScript as part of the JavaScript ecosystem). You will almost certainly invest a bunch of time-solving problems that would be automatically solved for you if you just stuck with JavaScript.

I will provide specific examples of solving problems using Django that would have been trivially solved in NextJS.

He goes on to share two reasons why you should use Python or Ruby for web projects in 2022.

You’re working on an existing project that hasn’t been migrated yet or is not worth migrating.
You are already a master of a Python or Ruby web stack, and you need to implement a new project as soon as possible, and you don’t have time to learn a better stack.

Tobias Koppers Vercel

Introducing Turbopack: Rust-based successor to Webpack

Webpack creator Tobias Koppers announcing its (Vercel-funded) successor:

Turbopack is built on a new incremental architecture for the fastest possible development experience. On large applications, it shows updates 10x faster than Vite and 700x faster than Webpack. On even larger applications, the difference is greater—often 20x faster than Vite.

Turbopack is open source and still in alpha. Here’s what the future may hold:

To start, Turbopack will be used for the Next.js 13 development server. It will power lightning-fast HMR, and it will support React Server Components natively, as well as TypeScript, JSX, CSS, and more.

Turbopack will eventually also power Next.js production builds, both locally and in the cloud. We’ll be able to share Turbo’s cache across your entire team, using Vercel Remote Caching.

Webpack users can also expect an incremental migration path into the Rust-based future with Turbopack.

Databases github.com

A collaborative IDE for your databases, right in your browser

Slashbase is an open-source collaborative IDE for your databases in your browser. Connect to your database, browse data, run a bunch of SQL commands or share SQL queries with your team, right from your browser!

It’s written in Golang and Nextjs React Framework (SPA) and runs as a single Linux binary with PostgreSQL. Documentation is currently WIP.

It’s early days and security will be a major concern to get right, but this has a lot of potential to unlock some cool use cases.

Next.js nextjs.org

Rust and JavaScript, sitting in a tree (Next.js 12)

Have you heard? The just-released 12th version of Next.js uses a Rust-based compiler (swc) to achieve ~3x faster local refreshes and ~5x faster production builds.

Compilation using Rust is 17x faster than Babel and enabled by default using Next.js 12, replacing transforming JavaScript and TypeScript files. This meant we had to port the Babel transformations in Next.js to Rust, including a brand new CSS parser in Rust used to implement the styled-jsx transform.

With the increased popularity of Rust and Go-based JS tooling, could there be a future where we don’t use any JavaScript to build our JavaScript apps? 🤔

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