Bryan Bogensberger blog.npmjs.org

npm announced plans to launch an open source funding platform

Bryan Bogensberger (CEO of npm) writes on npm blog: Over the past couple of years, we’ve observed a number of models emerging that enable a path towards sustainability for Open Source maintainers. Most notably: OpenCollective & GitHub Sponsors. We at npm are in full support of both these initiatives, and intend to collaborate further with these organizations. Now we are ready to invite the community’s most active contributors and the biggest enterprise consumers of public open source code to a working group to finalize the platform’s definition. Send questions/comments to funding-contributors@npmjs.com, or discuss your thoughts right here.

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KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Icon KubeCon + CloudNativeCon – Sponsored

10% off KubeCon registration using `KCNACHANGELOG19`

Share this discount code with your friends and tell them to thank us on Twitter (not required, but appreciated)! We’re excited to be partnered with the Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s flagship conference, which gathers adopters and technologists from leading open source and cloud native communities. This year the conference takes place in San Diego, California from November 18-21, 2019. Join Kubernetes, Prometheus, Envoy, CoreDNS, containerd, Fluentd, OpenTracing, gRPC, rkt, CNI, Jaeger, Notary, TUF, Vitess, NATS, Linkerd, Helm, Rook, Harbor, etcd, Open Policy Agent, CRI-O, and TiKV as the community gathers for four days to further the education and advancement of cloud native computing. Learn more and register — get 10% off with the code KCNACHANGELOG19.

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Chris Coyier CSS-Tricks

Should a website work without JavaScript?

Chris Coyier can’t help but chime in after listening to our recent debate episode of JS Party. I enjoyed all the stumbling around the terminology of “web apps” and “web sites” (web things!). This is such a weird one. It’s so easy to picture the difference in your head: it’s like facebook versus a blog! But when you start trying to define it exactly, it gets really murky really quickly and the distinction loses any value, if it had any to start with. Here’s more on that. Chris has a lot of great insights here. Whether you agree or disagree, I think we can all get on board with one thing: we make web things!

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ehmicky github.com

A simpler, faster alternative to `nvm run`

nve differentiates itself from nvm run because it: can be run programmatically is 10 times faster does not need a separate installation step for each Node version works on Windows does not require Bash is installed as a Node module Worth noting: this is not a full-on replacement for nvm or any other version manager. It only executes a single command with the specified Node version. But sometimes, that’s all you need. 😄

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Cate Huston developer.wordpress.com

Sharing the data: how technical women navigate their career

In May, Automattic’s engineering hiring team launched a user research study to better understand how our approach to tech hiring resonates with women and non-binary folks who may experience similar gender discrimination in the workplace and are experienced developers. 71 engineers responded and the research team performed in-depth interviews with 14 of them. Check out the study to see the expected results and things that surprised them. Here’s an example of the kind of takeaways came from the survey: Women are looking for more communities focused on connecting to other senior women, and around more technical topics (many communities focus on entry to mid-level folks). Concerns around online harassment can put women off trying to build their network online.

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DigitalOcean Icon DigitalOcean – Sponsored

Take the worry out of managing PostgreSQL, MySQL & Redis

Our friends at DigitalOcean introduced managed databases for PostgreSQL earlier this year. Recently, they added two new databases to their managed databases mix — MySQL and Redis! Whether you are using MySQL, Redis, or PostgreSQL, building and managing database clusters from the ground up is a herculean task. Developers often spend valuable time and resources on database management, which prevents them from focusing on building and enhancing apps. We introduced Managed Databases to simplify the lives of developers by addressing these common challenges: Determining the optimal infrastructure needed to host your databases is time-intensive Scaling the infrastructure that supports your database is often a slow and expensive task Implementing reliable failover processes is difficult Over-provisioning of underlying infrastructure leads to increased costs Setting up a complete and reliable backup and recovery process requires a lot of effort Maintaining and updating databases often needs dedicated personnel

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Practices github.com

Natural Language Processing best practices & examples

The goal of this repository is to build a comprehensive set of tools and examples that leverage recent advances in NLP algorithms, neural architectures, and distributed machine learning systems. The content is based on our past and potential future engagements with customers as well as collaboration with partners, researchers, and the open source community.

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Brent Simmons inessential.com

Brent Simmons on following through

If you’re an app maker, it might seem like your goal is to get to release day. Get the app done, make it available, publish an announcement, and then get back to coding. Let the world do what it’s going to do. But that’s not going to maximize your chances for a good release. You need to follow through — you need to keep going. Brent’s list of things you might do in the wake of a big release is worth tucking away for the day after your next one.

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The Changelog The Changelog #359

Maintainer spotlight! Feross Aboukhadijeh

In this episode we’re shining our maintainer spotlight on Feross Aboukhadijeh. Feross is the creator and maintainer of 100’s of open source projects which have been downloaded 100’s of million of times each month — projects like StandardJS, BitMidi, and WebTorrent to name a few. This episode with Feross continues our maintainer spotlight series where we dig deep into the life of an open source software maintainer. We’re producing this series in partnership with Tidelift. Huge thanks to Tidelift for making this series possible.

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Eryk Rakowski github.com

Share one Electron instance for multiple apps 🤞

A tool for building lighweight Electron apps using a global Electron instance. Forget about 100MB for a Hello World app in Electron! This works by creating a custom Electron distributable with a small app launcher which checks the app’s package.json and downloads corresponding version. Then the distributable can be used with electron-builder to build the app installers. I’d like to see a few folks kick the tires on this and report back how it works. Looks like there’s issues on older verisons of macOS, for starters.

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Stephanie Morillo stephaniemorillo.co

Naming things is hard but we still have to try

Stephanie Morillo: Naming things is hard because languages are hard, and no two people have the same exact understanding of the same word. But we have to ascribe names and labels to things all the time… This post seeks to help readers understand why labeling is so difficult. There’s a bit of linguistics, library science, and information architecture thrown in for good measure, but the point is this: language isn’t static and the same goes for the websites, databases, and other objects we create and build.

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Kent Beck Increment

Testing the boundaries of collaboration

Kent Beck, for Increment: It’s 2030. A programmer in Lagos extracts a helper method. Seconds later, the code of every developer working on the program around the world updates to reflect the change. Seconds later, each of the thousands of servers running the software updates. Seconds later, the device in my pocket in Berlin updates, along with hundreds of millions of other devices across the globe. Perhaps the most absurd assumption in this story is that I’ll still have a pocket in 10 years.

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