Wassim Chegham xlayers.dev

Preview and convert Sketch design files into any framework and library

xLayers is a web app which aims to bridge the gap between designers and developers. Its mission is to allow both the design and development worlds to collaborate and iterate fast. Upload your Sketch file and you will get the code generated for your favorite framework of choice (React, Vue, Angular, LitHtml, Stencil and even Xamarin Forms…and more to come).

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Piotr Murach github.com

tty-logger – readable, structured, beautiful logging in the terminal

A Ruby gem that significantly improves the situation with terminal logging as part of TTY Toolkit. It allows streaming of log data to any IO device (socket, file, etc…) with a highly customizable and pretty output to make key information stand out. You can limit the depth of the displayed data and specify the maximum size in bytes.

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Shopify Engineering Icon Shopify Engineering

Deconstructing the monolith

Shopify’s engineering team has been doing some serious engineering on their codebase: Shopify is one of the largest Ruby on Rails codebases in existence. It has been worked on for over a decade by more than a thousand developers. It encapsulates a lot of diverse functionality from billing merchants, managing 3rd party developer apps, updating products, handling shipping and so on. It was initially built as a monolith, meaning that all of these distinct functionalities were built into the same codebase with no boundaries between them. For many years this architecture worked for us, but eventually, we reached a point where the downsides of the monolith were outweighing the benefits. We had a choice to make about how to proceed. Click through for a breakdown of the benefits/drawbacks of monoliths and what they build to address the drawbacks without losing the benefits.

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X-Team Icon X-Team – Sponsored

Gamified challenges at work make me more productive

Over the past few months, Ed Rocha has been participating in X-Team’s gamified challenges. And when he says challenges, he doesn’t mean silly, boring stuff, but instead he means activities that genuinely energize you. It could be playing a game, visiting a new city, participating in a meetup, or simply working out. It’s fun, and it brings the X-Team community together. Here’s his experience… Learn more at x-team.com/join — the world’s most energizing community for developers.

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Laurence Bradford Forbes

Burnout in the tech industry (and why we need to talk about it)

How common is burnout in tech? According to this survey from Blind, nearly 60% of surveyed tech workers are burnt out. Blind is an anonymous, work email-verified, social networking platform for professionals… …used by 40,000 Microsoft employees, 25,000 from Amazon, 10,000 from Google, 7,000 from Uber, 6,000 from Facebook, and thousands from other tech companies, so there is wide representation in their survey results. This one-question survey had a simple yes/no answer: “Are you currently suffering from job burnout?” And over half of respondents (57.16%, to be exact) answered yes. So, are you currently suffering from job burnout?

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Phoenix mitchellhanberg.com

Temple – an elegant HTML library for Elixir and Phoenix

Conventional template languages like EEx use a form of interpolation to embed a programming language into a markup language, which can result in some ugly code that can be difficult to write and debug. Temple is written using pure elixir. There are some good ideas here, for sure. (Click through for code samples.) My concern with this (and with pretty much all non-HTML style template languages) is cognitive overhead for folks who’d rather be writing HTML. That being said, if I were creating a web app from scratch all by my lonesome, I’d 💯% give Temple a go.

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Cory Doctorow EFF

Adblocking: how about nah?

Cory Doctorow, writing for EFF about the history and present of adblocking: The rise and rise of ad-blockers (and ad-blocker-blocker-blockers) is without parallel: 26% of Internet users are now blocking ads, and the figure is rising. It’s been called the biggest boycott in human history. It’s also something we’ve seen before, in the earliest days of the Web, when pop-up ads ruled the world (wide web), and users went to war against them. Fascinating. I’d never heard of adversarial interoperability before.

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link Icon shahinsorkh.ir

What it's like to be a dev in Iran

As William Gibson says, “The future is already here — it’s just not very evenly distributed.” We cannot visit media websites like BBC, Fox News or VOA, social media websites like Twitter or Facebook, messengers like Telegram, WeChat, Kik or SnapChat, or services like YouTube, and —you may not believe— but even some SourceForge subdomains! How do devs in Iran survive? Proxies and VPNs, mostly. This is an eye-opening read if you (like me) have only ever written software from an unencumbered internet connection.

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JS Party JS Party #85

Building PizzaQL at the age of 16

Jerod, Mikeal, and Feross welcome Antoni Kepinski to the show to discuss his open source pizza ordering management web app. We talk about learning programming at a young age, how overwhelming web development can be these days, how Antoni decided which technologies to use, and more. This is a super fun conversation with many insights and takeaways for developers at every stage of their career.

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Dan Abramov overreacted.io

Algebraic effects for the rest of us

Like so many of Dan Abramov’s posts, this blew my mind. He is incredible at breaking down complicated concepts and making them understandable, as well as showing the reasons behind the concepts. Should you read this post? I’d say yes, but Dan would say: If you’re the kind of person who likes to learn about programming ideas several years before they hit the mainstream, it might be a good time to get curious about algebraic effects. Don’t feel like you have to though. It is a bit like thinking about async / await in 1999.

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Andrew Ste cvcompiler.com

The most in-demand data science skills of 2019

Since data science has a huge impact on today’s businesses, the demand for DS experts is growing. At the moment I’m writing this, there are 144,527 data science jobs on LinkedIn alone. But still, it’s important to keep your finger on the pulse of the industry to be aware of the fastest and most efficient data science solutions. Click through for key takeaways and trend analysis.

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Brad Frost bradfrost.com

Choosing tools

You’re working on a home improvement project. You can choose max. 5 tools. Which ones do you pick? Sort of depends on what the home improvement project is, yeah? If the gig is repairing the toilet tank gasket, I’m likely not going to need my circular saw. But what if I really love my circular saw? I agree 110% with what author Brad Frost is saying here - we have a tendency in our world to get caught up in which tools we like and try to apply them to every situation and rarely ask what the right tools are for any particular job.

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Jessie Frazelle blog.jessfraz.com

The business executive's guide to Kubernetes

This isn’t just for business executives. It’s good knowledge to have for anyone who has heard the hype around K8S but never any of the potential problems: This post will cover some hard truths of Kubernetes and what it means for your organization and business. You might have heard the term “Kubernetes” and you might have been led to believe that this will solve all the infrastructure pain for your organization. There is some truth to that, which will not be the focus of this post. To get to the state of enlightenment with Kubernetes, you need to first go through some hard challenges. Let’s dive in to some of these hard truths.

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Go github.com

Use SQL to query & transform data from multiple databases & file formats

OctoSQL is a SQL query engine which allows you to write standard SQL queries on data stored in multiple SQL databases, NoSQL databases and files in various formats trying to push down as much of the work as possible to the source databases, not transferring unnecessary data. OctoSQL does that by creating an internal representation of your query and later translating parts of it into the query languages or APIs of the source databases. Whenever a datasource doesn’t support a given operation, OctoSQL will execute it in memory, so you don’t have to worry about the specifics of the underlying datasources. If you like writing SQL, you’ll probably like OctoSQL.

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