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Svelte

A JavaScript UI framework that does its heavy lifting at build time instead of run time.
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Tan Li Hau youtube.com

Build your own Svelte

Tan Li Hau gave this talk at Front Conference, but the videos won’t be out for a year (!), so he gave the talk again and posted it to his YouTube channel. Here’s how he described the video to us:

Watch the <1 hour video to write a simplified Svelte compiler <300 lines of code is amazing! Easy to follow, inspiring, and gives a great overview of how to write a compiler.

Svelte github.com

The Svelte compiler rewritten in Rust

When Rich Harris was last on JS Party, he wondered aloud:

“Should I learn Rust? Should we rewrite the Svelte compiler in Rust?” Maybe it’s a terrible idea, I don’t know, but I think it’s at least worth investigating.

Well, the effort we’re linking to here isn’t by Rich, but another member of the Svelte community. Their reasoning:

My main reason for doing this, is to compile Svelte without Node.js and possibly use Deno instead.

And the state of the project:

This is still a big work in progress. I’m mainly working on this for fun and learning. I came up with the name rustle by combining rust and svelte (ruslte => rustle). The project is open to naming suggestions!

JavaScript github.com

What if React's API and Svelte's compiler had a baby

Million makes creating user interfaces as easy as React, but with faster performance and smaller bundle size for the end user. By computing the user interface beforehand with a compiler, Million reduces the overhead of traditional Virtual DOM.

Okay cool… but why should I use Million if I can just use Preact if I need something a bit more lightweight?

While alternative libraries like Preact reduce bundle sizes by efficient code design, Million takes it a step further by leveraging compilation to make a quantum leap in improving bundle size and render speed.

Watch the video or get started with the docs.

Twitter Icon Twitter

Rich Harris joins Vercel to work on Svelte full time

Cool move by Vercel. Rich says:

so happy about what this means for svelte’s future. it’ll be the same independent, pluralistic project as before, but with Vercel’s backing we can get ✨ a m b i t i o u s ✨

Congrats to the Svelte community! We’ll surely dicsuss this move and what all it means when Rich joins us on JS Party in early December.

Mat Ryer pace.dev

Passive user preferences with persisted stores in Svelte

Mat Ryer makes the case for passive user preferences, which is where you store their last used setting for them without asking and then set it as the default the next time they interact with that part of your app. He then goes on to describe how they accomplish this with Svelte. Good stuff!

If you want to hear more about how they’re using Svelte and Go to build Pace, we did a pair of podcasts on the topic earlier this year.

Svelte svelte.dev

Svelte <3 TypeScript

Orta Therox, making the big announcement on behalf of the Svelte team:

We think it’ll give you a much nicer development experience — one that also scales beautifully to larger Svelte code bases — regardless of whether you use TypeScript or JavaScript.

Up until now TypeScript was usable with Svelte, but not officially supported by the project. What does that official support look like?

  • You can use TypeScript inside your <script> blocks — just add the lang="ts" attribute
  • Components with TypeScript can be type-checked with the svelte-check command
  • You get autocompletion hints and type-checking as you’re writing components, even in expressions inside markup
  • TypeScript files understand the Svelte component API — no more red squiggles when you import a .svelte file into a .ts module

I know a lot of people have been waiting for this. Congrats to all involved on a big release!

Svelte github.com

Why Svelte is our choice for a large web project in 2020

This is a well-reasoned piece that includes Svelte’s advantages, disadvantages, and drawbacks today.

Is using bleeding edge tech risky and foolish? How much blood are we talking about? My experience tells me Svelte is a safe choice, more leading edge than bleeding. However I’m more risk tolerant than most people, I have a lot of experience with JS frameworks, and our team is motivated, so we can deal with rough edges.

Dániel Kántor github.com

An experiment to create a community-driven language learning platform

Dániel Kantor:

My goal is to start a community-driven language-learning platform that gives it’s users and contributors a way to influence it’s future and adapt it to special requirements.

Once course content is properly decoupled from the software, it should be possible to experiment with alternative ways of using course content: for example, the creation of audiobooks or print material.

The Spanish course is already started for demo purposes

Svelte github.com

A Svelte compiler & watcher that works with Snowpack

The goal of svelvet is to make svelte play nicely with snowpack and web_modules.

As of today, svelte depends on a loader for webpack or rollup which compiles your svelte components into individual js files. Since snowpack’s goal is to avoid the need for a bundler, we can’t use those loaders, but we can use svelte’s internal compiler api to do 95% of the work for us. On top of that, svelvet adds automatic file watching to recompile your svelte files just like a loader would, but much faster!

I’m not gonna lie, any green field that offers a super light build process is looking pretty stinkin’ green these days. That being said, there’s a reason we call it the bleeding edge.

Rich Harris svelte.dev

Svelte 3: rethinking reactivity

After several months of being just days away, we are over the moon to announce the stable release of Svelte 3. This is a huge release representing hundreds of hours of work by many people in the Svelte community, including invaluable feedback from beta testers who have helped shape the design every step of the way.

Lots of folks (myself included) have been eagerly awaiting this release after Rich teed it up on The Changelog #332. We’d love to hear your first impressions!

The Changelog The Changelog #332

A UI framework without the framework

Jerod and Adam talked with Rich Harris –a JavaScript Journalist on The New York Times Investigations team– about his magical disappearing UI framework called Svelte. We compare and contrast Svelte to React, how the framework is embedded in a component, build time vs. run time, scoping CSS to components, and CSS in JavaScript. Rich also shares where Svelte v3 is heading and the details on Sapper, a framework for building extremely high-performance progressive web apps, powered by Svelte.

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