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GitHub kolide.com

GitHub Copilot isn't worth the risk

Elaine Atwell says all CTOs urgently need to answer the question: should I allow Copilot at my company?

If you haven’t already figured it out from the title, Elaine’s answer to that question is No. But that might not be the right answer for everyone. In this article, she goes over the case for and against Copilot, and how you can detect whether it’s already in use at your organization.

Matthew Butt­erick githubcopilotlitigation.com

We've filed a lawsuit challenging GitHub Copilot

A couple weeks back, Adam logged some news that linked to githubcopilotinvestigation.com. Well, There’s a new website now: githubcopilotlitigation.com

Matthew Butterick:

By train­ing their AI sys­tems on pub­lic GitHub repos­i­to­ries (though based on their pub­lic state­ments, pos­si­bly much more) we con­tend that the defen­dants have vio­lated the legal rights of a vast num­ber of cre­ators who posted code or other work under cer­tain open-source licenses on GitHub. Which licenses? A set of 11 pop­u­lar open-source licenses that all require attri­bu­tion of the author’s name and copy­right, includ­ing the MIT license, the GPL, and the Apache license.

Matthew Butt­erick githubcopilotinvestigation.com

GitHub Copilot Investigation

Is GitHub Copilot an AI parasite trained in the realms of fair use on pub­lic code any­where on the inter­net? Or, is it a much needed automation layer to all the reasons we open source in the first place?

When I first wrote about Copi­lot, I said “I’m not wor­ried about its effects on open source.” In the short term, I’m still not wor­ried. But as I reflected on my own jour­ney through open source—nearly 25 years—I real­ized that I was miss­ing the big­ger pic­ture. After all, open source isn’t a fixed group of peo­ple. It’s an ever-grow­ing, ever-chang­ing col­lec­tive intel­li­gence, con­tin­u­ally being renewed by fresh minds. We set new stan­dards and chal­lenges for each other, and thereby raise our expec­ta­tions for what we can accom­plish.

Amidst this grand alchemy, Copi­lot inter­lopes. Its goal is to arro­gate the energy of open-source to itself. We needn’t delve into Microsoft’s very check­ered his­tory with open source to see Copi­lot for what it is: a par­a­site.

The legal­ity of Copi­lot must be tested before the dam­age to open source becomes irrepara­ble. That’s why I’m suit­ing up.

What are your thoughts on this investigation and “poten­tial law­suit” against GitHub Copi­lot?

Go Time Go Time #244

The art of the PR: Part 2

In this episode, we’ll be further exploring PRs. Check out The art of the PR: Part 1 if you haven’t yet. What is it that makes a PR a good PR? How do you consider PRs in an open source repo? How do you vet contributions from people who aren’t a part of the repository? How does giving feedback and encouragement fit in to the PR process? We’ll be debating the details, and trying to help our fellow gophers perfect the art of the PR. We are joined by the awesome Anderson Queiroz, hosted by Natalie Pistunovich & Angelica Hill.

Go Time Go Time #243

The art of the PR: Part 1

In this episode, we will be exploring PRs. What makes a good PR? How do you give the best PR review? Is there such thing as too small, or big of a PR? We’ll be debating the details, and trying to help our fellow gophers perfect the art of the PR. We are joined by three wonderful guests Jeff Hernandez, Sarah Duncan, and Natasha Dykes. Hosted by Angelica Hill & Natalie Pistunovich.

The GitHub Blog Icon The GitHub Blog

GitHub officially says farewell to Atom

GitHub will archive all projects under the Atom org on December 15, 2022. Why?

Atom has not had significant feature development for the past several years, though we’ve conducted maintenance and security updates during this period to ensure we’re being good stewards of the project and product. As new cloud-based tools have emerged and evolved over the years, Atom community involvement has declined significantly. As a result, we’ve decided to sunset Atom so we can focus on enhancing the developer experience in the cloud with GitHub Codespaces.

Atom was co-founder and long-time CEO Chris Wanstrath’s baby. We first heard its story from project lead Nathan Sobo on The Changelog back in 2017. Here’s what he had to say about the end of Atom’s era:

As Atom’s sun sets, Zed’s sun is rising. We’re not done here.

Founders Talk Founders Talk #90

From GitHub TV to Rewatch

Connor Sears, founder and CEO of Rewatch, joins Adam to share the journey of creating Rewatch. What began inside of GitHub to help them thrive and connect is now available to every product team on the planet. Rewatch lets teams save, manage, and search all their video content so they can collaborate async and with greater flexibility. We talk about where the tool’s inspiration came from (spoiler alert, inside GitHub it was called GitHub TV which you’ll hear during the show), how teams leverage video to reduce the constraints of communication, how Connor and his co-founder knew they had product-fit and how they grew the team and product, and of course the flip side of that — we talk about some of Connor’s failures along the way, and knowing when it’s the right time to take a big swing.

The GitHub Blog Icon The GitHub Blog

GitHub will require 2FA by the end of 2023

Mike Hanley on GitHub’s blog:

The software supply chain starts with the developer. Developer accounts are frequent targets for social engineering and account takeover, and protecting developers from these types of attacks is the first and most critical step toward securing the supply chain…

Today, as part of a platform-wide effort to secure the software ecosystem through improving account security, we’re announcing that GitHub will require all users who contribute code on GitHub.com to enable one or more forms of two-factor authentication (2FA) by the end of 2023.

This is a big step in the right direction and their new(ish) 2FA for GitHub Mobile feature helps make the burden not as cumbersome as it might be otherwise.

GitHub httpie.io

How HTTPie lost 54k GitHub stars

A tragic tale, but one worth sharing because we can all learn from their mistake:

Due to an unfortunate sequence of events, I accidentally made the project’s repository private for a moment. And GitHub cascade-deleted our community that took 10 years to build.

Whoops! This reminds me of the time I thought it’d be cute to set JSPartyFM’s Twitter birth date to the day our first episode shipped, which immediately resulted in the account being suspended for being too young.

Sounds like GitHub isn’t up for restoring their stars, so if you were following HTTPie before, you’ll want to head over there and give ’em a re-star.

GitHub github.com

HUBFS – a file system for GitHub

HUBFS is a file system for GitHub and Git. Git repositories and their contents are represented as regular directories and files and are accessible by any application, without the application having any knowledge that it is really accessing a remote Git repository. The repositories are writable and allow editing files and running build operations.

So if you hubfs mnt (on macOS/Linux), it will set up a file hierarchy inside /mnt that follows this pattern: / owner / repository / ref / path. Cool idea! It is affected by GitHub’s API rate limiting and I’m not sure if/how it syncs (commits) back to the remote repos…

Go Time Go Time #213

AI-driven development in Go

Alexey Palazhchenko joins Natalie to discuss the implications of GitHub’s Copilot on code generation. Go’s design lends itself nicely to computer generated authoring: thanks to go fmt, there’s already only one Go style. This means AI-generated code will be consistent and seamless. Its focus on simplicity & readability make it tailor made for this new approach to software creation. Where might this take us?

Martin Heinz martinheinz.dev

Building GitHub Apps with Go

If you’re using GitHub as your version control system of choice then GitHub Apps can be incredibly useful for many tasks including building CI/CD, managing repositories, querying statistical data and much more. In this article we will walk through the process of building such an app in Go including setting up the GitHub integration, authenticating with GitHub, listening to webhooks, querying GitHub API and more.

The Changelog The Changelog #470

Returning to GitHub to lead Sponsors

Today we’re joined by Jessica Lord, talking about the origins of Electron and her boomerang back to GitHub to lead GitHub Sponsors. We cover the early days of Electron before Electron was Electron, how she advocated to turn it into a product and make it a framework, how it’s used today, why she boomeranged back to GitHub to lead Sponsors, what’s next in funding open source creators, and we attempt to answer the question “what happens to open source once it’s funded?”

The GitHub Blog Icon The GitHub Blog

GitHub has a new CEO

Thomas Dohmke will be CEO of GitHub. He served as GitHub’s Chief Product Officer, and according to his LinkedIn bio — Thomas led the acquisition of GitHub at Microsoft and the acquisitions of Dependabot, Semmle, and npm.

This morning, I shared the following post with Hubbers in response to Nat’s announcement about his next adventure. I am thrilled to take on the role of CEO to build the next phase of GitHub for our global community of software developers.

Exiting as CEO, Nat Friedman shared his thanks in a post titled “Thank you, GitHub”.

This morning, I sent the following post to the GitHub team. TL;DR: I’m moving on to my next adventure, and Thomas Dohmke (currently Chief Product Officer) will be GitHub’s next CEO. I will become Chairman Emeritus, which fulfills my lifelong ambition of having a title in Latin. My heartfelt thanks to every Hubber and every developer who makes GitHub what it is, every day.

The Changelog The Changelog #459

Coding in the cloud with Codespaces

On this special edition of The Changelog, we’re talking with Cory Wilkerson, Senior Director of Engineering at GitHub, about GitHub Codespaces. For years now, the possibility of coding in the cloud seemed so close, yet so far away for a number of reasons. According to Cory, the raw ingredients to make coding in the cloud a reality have been there for years. The challenge has really been how the industry thinks, and we are now at a place where the skepticism in cloud based workflows is “non-existent.”

After 15 months in preview, GitHub not only announced the availability of Codespaces for Teams and Enterprise — they also showcased their internal adoption, with 600 of their 1,000 engineers using it daily to develop GitHub.com.

On this episode, Cory shares the full backstory of that journey and a peek into the future where we’re all coding in the cloud.

Founders Talk Founders Talk #79

The acquisition of a lifetime

On today’s show Adam is joined by John Nunemaker (an old friend). For some of you listening you might remember John’s appearance on The Changelog #11, which was basically forever ago. Or his company Ordered List — they made Gauges, Harmony, and Speaker Deck which was quite popular in its time — so much so that they attracted the attention of Chris Wanstrath, one of the co-founders of GitHub to acquire Ordered List. The rest as they say is history. Today, John and I go back through that history to see what it was like to be acquired by GitHub and how that single choice has forever changed his life.

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