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Terminal

The preferred computing interface for many hackers around the world.
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Jacob Zelko jacobzelko.com

A terminal-based workflow for research, writing, and programming

As both a researcher and a programmer, switching between word processors, programming environments and file explorers was a pain. In this blog post, I show how I streamlined this process to where I never have to leave my terminal to write papers in LaTeX and Markdown, run code snippets directly from my scripts to a REPL, and save sessions and layouts so in just a few clicks.

A terminal-based workflow for research, writing, and programming

Hardware clockworkpi.com

An open source portable terminal for every dev

DevTerm is a post-modern, digital minimalist lifestyle. The A5 notebook size integrates complete PC functions with a retro-futurism design, a 6.8-inch ultra-wide screen, classic QWERTY keyboard, necessary interfaces, high-speed wireless, long battery life, and even includes a practical thermal printer.

It even includes a printer?! This thing is bonkers. Pre-order today. Shipping “before April 2021”.

An open source portable terminal for every dev

Rust github.com

An independent Rust text editor that runs in your terminal

Ox is a code editor. It was written in Rust using ANSI escape sequences. It assists developers with programming by providing several tools to speed up and make programming easier and a refreshing alternative to heavily bloated and resource hungry editors such as VS Code and JetBrains. Ox is lightweight so it can be used on older computers.

Bear in mind, this is a personal project and is nowhere near ready to replace your existing tools just yet.

Ox is stealing good ideas from existing editors and provides a rundown of what that means in the README. It works on Linux, macOS, and Windows via WSL.

An independent Rust text editor that runs in your terminal

Terminal github.com

A fun, functional and stateful way to build terminal apps

Bubble Tea is built with Go, but it’s based on the Elm Architecture so it might not seem very Go-like at first, but the author thinks hopes you’ll see past that and realize that many of Go’s idioms are at play as well.

Bubble Tea is in use in production and includes a number of features and performance optimizations we’ve added along the way. Among those is a standard framerate-based renderer, a renderer for high-performance scrollable regions which works alongside the main renderer, and mouse support.

A fun, functional and stateful way to build terminal apps

Terminal github.com

What's new in htop 3

Everyone’s (or at least my) favorite system monitoring tool is still alive and kickin’ with a big 3.0 release. In addition to a new display option to show CPU frequency in CPU meters, optional vim key mapping mode, and many other goodies, the big news is this:

New maintainers - after a prolonged period of inactivity from Hisham, the creator and original maintainer, a team of community maintainers have volunteered to take over a fork at htop.dev and github.com/htop-dev to keep the project going.

Open source FTW!

More good news: Hisham has agreed to join us on Maintainer Spotlight!

Terminal github.com

A futuristic terminal emulator inspired by TRON Legacy

the eDEX-UI project was originally meant to be DEX-UI with less « art » and more « distributable software »”. While keeping a futuristic look and feel, it strives to maintain a certain level of functionality and to be usable in real-life scenarios, with the larger goal of bringing science-fiction UXs to the mainstream.

It might or might not be a joke taken too seriously.

Confession: I’ve shared this before. Sorry not sorry. It’s too cool!

A futuristic terminal emulator inspired by TRON Legacy

Jeffrey Paul sneak.berlin

Stupid unix tricks

Jeffrey Paul shares a ⛴ load of goodies. I particularly like this idea:

I have a Makefile in my home directory… that I use to store common tasks related to my local machine… The one I use most often, though, is make clean, which takes everything in ~/Desktop and moves it into ~/Documents/$YYYYMM (creating the month directory in the process if it doesn’t exist), and also empties trashes.

Reader beware: 4154 words, approximately a 23 minute read

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