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Terminal

The preferred computing interface for many hackers around the world.
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Jeffrey Paul sneak.berlin

Stupid unix tricks

Jeffrey Paul shares a ⛴ load of goodies. I particularly like this idea: I have a Makefile in my home directory… that I use to store common tasks related to my local machine… The one I use most often, though, is make clean, which takes everything in ~/Desktop and moves it into ~/Documents/$YYYYMM (creating the month directory in the process if it doesn’t exist), and also empties trashes. Reader beware: 4154 words, approximately a 23 minute read

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Piotr Murach github.com

tty-logger – readable, structured, beautiful logging in the terminal

A Ruby gem that significantly improves the situation with terminal logging as part of TTY Toolkit. It allows streaming of log data to any IO device (socket, file, etc…) with a highly customizable and pretty output to make key information stand out. You can limit the depth of the displayed data and specify the maximum size in bytes.

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The Verge Icon The Verge

Microsoft unveils Windows Terminal

Microsoft is launching a new command line app for Windows, dubbed Windows Terminal. It’s designed to be the central location for access to environments like PowerShell, Cmd, and the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). Microsoft is adding multiple tab support alongside theming and customization for developers who want to tweak the Terminal app. It officially launches in June, but the source code is already up on GitHub so you build it yourself today.

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John D. Cook johndcook.com

The hard part in becoming a command line wizard

John D. Cook: I’ve long been impressed by shell one-liners. They seem like magical incantations. Pipe a few terse commands together, et voilà! Out pops the solution to a problem that would seem to require pages of code. Are these one-liners real or mythology? To some extent, they’re both. Below I’ll give a famous real example. Then I’ll argue that even though such examples do occur, they may create unrealistic expectations. I agree with his overall argument, but the good news about the command line is you don’t have to become a wizard to get value out of it. Start small and go from there.

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Awesome Lists github.com

Level up your dotfiles by reading these awesome dotfiles

On our recent text mode episode, we mentioned learning from other people’s dotfiles. Adam found this awesome-dotfiles repo and included it in the show notes, but I thought I’d log it as well to call more attention to it. Also, did you like my idea near the end of the show to produce some videos of smart/interesting developers walking us through their dotfiles? Holla back in the comments…

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Daniel Weibel itnext.io

macOS uses a completely outdated version of Bash

This post from Daniel Weibel not only explains how macOS uses an outdated version of Bash, but also how to upgrade to the latest Bash via Homebrew. One thing that many macOS users don’t know is that they are using a completely outdated version of the Bash shell. However, it is highly recommended to use a newer version of Bash on macOS, because it enables you to use useful new features. $ bash --version GNU bash, version 3.2.57(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin18) Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc. The reason Apple uses this old version of Bash has to do with licensing. Bash 4.0 and newer uses the GNU General Public License v3 (GPLv3), which Apple doesn’t support. There are some discussions about this on Reddit. Version 3.2 of GNU Bash is the last version with a license that Apple is willing to accept, and so it sticks with it.

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