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Git

Git is the most widely used version control system.
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Patrick DeVivo github.com

Identify the most relevant git contributors based on commit recency, frequency, and impact

gitpert measures the “pertinence” of git authors as a time-decayed measure of LOC added and removed to a repository (or a set of files in a repository). It’s meant to help identify who the most relevant contributors are based on commit recency, frequency and impact.

Cool tool, as long as we don’t forget about non-code contributors.

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

How git changed the way we code

The New Stack takes us on a fun trip down memory lane:

Fifteen years ago a number of the Linux kernel developers tossed their hands in the air and gave up on their version control system, BitKeeper. Why? The man who held the copyright for BitKeeper, Larry McVoy, withdrew free use of his product on claims that one of the kernel devs had reverse engineered one of the BitKeeper protocols.

Linux creator Linus Torvalds sought out a replacement to house the Linux kernel code. After careful consideration, Torvalds realized none of the available options were efficient enough to meet his needs:

Drew Devault drewdevault.com

Drew Devault's unorthodox, branchless git workflow

In short, I use git branches very rarely, preferring to work on my local master branch almost every time. When I want to work on multiple tasks in the same repository (i.e. often), I just… work on all of them on master. I waste no time creating a new branch, or switching to another branch to change contexts; I just start writing code and committing changes, all directly on master, intermixing different workstreams freely. This reduces my startup time to zero, both for starting new tasks and revisiting old work.

If the blog post ended here, you might think Drew is crazy. But he goes on to explain how he uses rebase to clean things up before pushing upstream.

I enjoy hanging out on master quite a bit, myself. However, when I’m ready to take on something “big” or “gnarly” I don’t hesitate to git checkout -b and work from there.

Jonathan Carter github.com

GistPad for VS Code 📘

GistPad is a Visual Studio Code extension that allows you to manage GitHub Gists entirely within the editor. You can open, create, delete, fork, star and clone gists, and then seamlessly begin editing files as if they were local.

The big idea here is to use gists to seamlessly create your “very own developer library”. The interactive playgrounds is pretty cool, too.

GistPad for VS Code 📘

Victor Zhou victorzhou.com

Git aliases I use (because I'm lazy)

I’ve used Git for over a decade, but it doesn’t matter. Every single time I read a post like this one where somebody shares their aliases/shortcuts/etc, I pick up something new. Every. Single. Time.

What’s fun about this post is Victor also does the math to see if he’s actually saving himself time with all these aliases.

Assuming I type ~100 Git commands in an average 8-hour workday, that’s 550 characters saved, which converts to about one minute saved per day

That isn’t much time saved, but it still feels good, and that counts for something!

Jay Phelps github.com

git-blame-someone-else

This changes not only who authored the commit but the listed commiter as well. It also is something I wrote as a joke, so please don’t run this against your production repo and complain if this script deletes everything.

Alias this to git-take-the-credit so you can put your name on that awesome commit your co-worker made the other day. 😜

git-blame-someone-else

Git github.com

A tool to monitor Git repos and automatically pull & push changes

gitomatic <path>

2019/08/03 00:16:48 Checking repository: /tmp/gitomatic-test/
2019/08/03 00:16:48 Pulling changes...
2019/08/03 00:16:49 New file detected: hello_world.txt
2019/08/03 00:16:49 Adding file to work-tree: hello_world.txt
2019/08/03 00:16:49 Creating commit: Add hello_world.txt.
2019/08/03 00:16:49 Pushing changes...
2019/08/03 00:16:53 Sleeping until next check in 10s...
2019/08/03 00:17:03 Checking repository: /tmp/gitomatic-test/
2019/08/03 00:17:03 Pulling changes...
2019/08/03 00:17:07 Deleted file detected: hello_world.txt
2019/08/03 00:17:07 Removing file from work-tree: hello_world.txt
2019/08/03 00:17:07 Creating commit: Remove hello_world.txt.
2019/08/03 00:17:07 Pushing changes...

Git lukasmestan.com

Git quick statistics

Any git repository contains a tonne of information about commits, contributors, and files. Extracting this information is not always trivial, mostly because of a gadzillion options to a gadzillion git commands – I don’t think there is a single person alive who knows them all. Probably not even Linus Torvalds himself :)

Truth. Clone the repo here and make install or brew install git-quick-stats if you’re on macOS.

Git quick statistics
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