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Tooling github.com

Search inside YouTube videos using natural language

Use OpenAI’s CLIP neural network to search inside YouTube videos. You can try it by running the notebook on Google Colab.

The README has a bunch of examples of things you might search for and the results you’d get back. (“The Transamerica Pyramid”, anyone?)

The author also has another related project where you can search Unsplash in like manner.

Patrick DeVivo try.askgit.com

Try AskGit SQL in your browser

Remember Patrick DeVivo’s super cool AskGit project where you can query your git repo’s history with SQL? Well, now you can kick the tires without installing a thing by using AskGit’s new web interface!

Here’s an example query where we learn that I do most of my coding (or committing, at least) on Mondays and Tuesdays while Adam and Gerhard lean towards Friday.

Machine Learning huyenchip.com

The MLOps tooling landscape in early 2021 (284 tools)

Chip Huyen:

While looking for these MLOps tools, I discovered some interesting points about the MLOps landscape:

  1. Increasing focus on deployment
  2. The Bay Area is still the epicenter of machine learning, but not the only hub
  3. MLOps infrastructures in the US and China are diverging
  4. More interests in machine learning production from academia

If MLOps is new to you, Practical AI did a deep dive on the topic that will help you sort it out. Or if you’d prefer a shallow dive… just watch this.

Bash github.com

A temporary SMS utility right from your terminal 📥

tmpsms is a command line utility written in POSIX sh that allows you to get a temporary phone number and receive SMSes. It uses Upmasked temporary SMS service in order to receive the messages. This is a very useful tool for those who use are testing applications during bug bounty hunting or just need some privacy and don’t wan’t to use your personal phone number.

I don’t know when I’d ever use this, but I love that it’s POSIX compliant and depends on just a few other CLI tools (curl, jq, and fzf).

A temporary SMS utility right from your terminal 📥

 Itamar Turner-Trauring pythonspeed.com

CI for performance: Reliable benchmarking in noisy environments

Benchmarking is often not done in CI because it’s so hard to get consistent results; there’s a lot of noise in cloud VMs, so you ideally want dedicated hardware. But, it turns out you can use a tool called Cachegrind to get consistent benchmarks results across different computers, allowing you to run benchmarks in GitHub Actions, GitLab CI, etc. and still get consistent results.

Patrick DeVivo augmentable.medium.com

Identifying code churn with AskGit SQL

In which I detail A SQL query that helps you identify files in a codebase that have “churned” in the past year. In other words, list the files that have been changed by the most number of commits in the last year.

SELECT file,
       COUNT(*)
FROM   stats
       JOIN commits
         ON stats.commit_id = commits.id
WHERE  commits.author_when > DATE('now', '-12 month')
       AND commits.parent_count < 2 -- ignore merge commits
GROUP  BY file
ORDER  BY COUNT(*) DESC
LIMIT  50

GitHub github.com

An uptime monitor and status page powered by GitHub Actions

Okay this is pretty stinkin’ clever.

  • GitHub Actions is used as an uptime monitor
    • Every 5 minutes, a workflow visits your website to make sure it’s up
    • Response time is recorded every 6 hours and committed to git
    • Graphs of response time are generated every day
  • GitHub Issues are used for incident reports
    • An issue is opened if an endpoint is down
    • People from your team are assigned to the issue
    • Incidents reports are posted as issue comments
    • Issues are locked so non-members cannot comment on them
    • Issues are closed automatically when your site comes back up
    • Slack notifications are sent on updates
  • GitHub Pages are used for the status website
    • A simple, beautiful, and accessible PWA is generated
    • Built with Svelte and Sapper
    • Fetches data from this repository using the GitHub API

Command line interface github.com

cheat lets you access interactive cheatsheets from the CLI

It was designed to help remind *nix system administrators of options for commands that they use frequently, but not frequently enough to remember.

Let’s imagine a completely hypothetical world where it’s the umpteenth time you’ve used it, but you still can’t remember which flags to send to tar… so you run:

cheat tar

You’ll be greeted by:

# To extract an uncompressed archive:
tar -xvf '/path/to/foo.tar'

# To extract a .gz archive:
tar -xzvf '/path/to/foo.tgz'

# To create a .gz archive:
tar -czvf '/path/to/foo.tgz' '/path/to/foo/'

# To extract a .bz2 archive:
tar -xjvf '/path/to/foo.tgz'

# To create a .bz2 archive:
tar -cjvf '/path/to/foo.tgz' '/path/to/foo/'

The cheatsheets themselves are community-sourced.

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