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What can we expect from 5G?

An in-progress series by the Ars Technica team looking at all the implications, limitations, and current realities of the much-hyped next generation in cellular networking. There are 3 articles thus far:

  1. 5G in rural areas bridges a gap that 4G doesn’t, especially low- and mid-band
  2. Taking 5G to work, in offices, and on the factory floor—will it help?
  3. What the advent of 5G—mmWave and otherwise—will mean for online gaming

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Iowa man plans armed home invasion instead of paying $20k for domain name

This story comes from Ars Technica, not The Onion:

In June 2017, Adams drove Hopkins to the domain-name owner’s house “and provided Hopkins with a demand note, which contained instructions for transferring the domain to Adams’ GoDaddy account,” the DOJ said. The heist didn’t go as planned, and both the domain-name owner and Hopkins ended up suffering gunshot wounds.

Can you imagine transferring a domain name at gun point?

Peter Bright Ars Technica

Google isn’t the company we should have handed the web over to

Peter Bright writes for Ars Technica:

Microsoft adopting Chromium puts the Web in a perilous place. […] With Microsoft’s decision to end development of its own Web rendering engine and switch to Chromium, control over the Web has functionally been ceded to Google. That’s a worrying turn of events, given the company’s past behavior.

This post was mentioned in Slack by James Lovato about a former Microsoft Edge intern claiming Google callously broke rival web browsers. Then, Nick Nisi chimed in to mention this post by Jeremy Noring as “an interesting rebuttal/defense of what they’re doing.”

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