Learn Icon

Learn

Learning to code, leveling up, building your skills. Expand your résumé and pursue a fulfilling developer career.
260 Stories
All Topics

Databases github.com

toyDB – a distributed SQL db written in Rust

This is not a use-it-in-the-real-world kinda thing. It’s being written as a learning project, but may interest you if you want to learn about database internals. It includes:

  • Raft-based distributed consensus engine for linearizable state machine replication.
  • ACID-compliant transaction engine with MVCC-based snapshot isolation.
  • Pluggable storage engine with B+tree and log-structured backends.
  • Iterator-based query engine with heuristic optimization and time-travel support.
  • SQL interface including projections, filters, joins, aggregates, and transactions.

Databases sqlbolt.com

SQLBolt – quickly learn SQL right in your browser

This series of interactive lessons and exercises is a great place to start if you want to learn SQL. And trust me: if you don’t know SQL, you want to learn SQL. Of all the technologies and tools I’ve picked up over the course of my career, SQL has had one of the highest ROIs. It’s portable across languages/runtimes and has incredible staying power in terms of skill relevancy.

Alex Ellis blog.alexellis.io

I wrote a book about Everyday Go

This is my third eBook on Go, and it’s one of the ways I’m supporting my time to make open source contributions and lead the OpenFaaS community. The book covers samples, examples and techniques that I’ve learned over the past 5-6 years.

The point is not to be an 800-page tomb with tenuous links between content, but code from real open source applications that are run in production at scale.

There’s been over 300 copies sold already and I’m offering a money back guarantee if anyone should feel it didn’t meet their expectations.

Learn rexegg.com

The best regex trick

This post does a great job of laying out all of the cumbersome/verbose ways you can solve a problem with regular expressions and then showing the tricky way of doing the same thing without all the hassle. With this trick up your sleeve, you’ll be able to answer all of these questions:

  • How do I match a word unless it’s surrounded by quotes?
  • How do I match xyz except in contexts a, b or c?
  • How do I match every word except those on a blacklist (or other contexts)?
  • How do I ignore all content that is bolded (… and other contexts)?

Ruby github.com

A pure-Ruby JIT compiler for Ruby (read it, don't use it!)

This project is no longer actively developed, but it looks like an excellent resource for anyone who is interested in compilers. Ruby is an easy language to grok, so it should make for (relatively) easy reading!

Rhizome is a paedagogical just-in-time compiler (JIT) for Ruby, implemented in pure Ruby. It’s not really designed to be used. It’s designed to show you how JITs work and why perhaps a JIT for Ruby should be written in Ruby. It’s also designed to try to go beyond the trivial aspects of a simple template compiler that introductions to JITs often show - instead it has a proper intermediate representation (IR) and shows how more advanced parts of compilers such as lowering and schedulers work, that people don’t usually cover.

CSS web.dev

An evergreen CSS course and reference to level up your web styling expertise

This is the resource that Una Kravets said we’d put in the show notes on JS Party #176. I thought it was worth a direct linking in News as well, since it’s so freakin’ well-done and useful:

You’ll learn CSS fundamentals like the box model, cascade and specificity, flexbox, grid and z-index. And, along with these fundamentals, you’ll learn about functions, color types, gradients, logical properties and inheritance to make you a well-rounded front-end developer, ready to take on any user interface.

Awesome Lists github.com

Awesome online talks and screencasts

There are a lot of screencasts, recordings of user group gatherings and conference talks available online. I try to commit myself watching at least two new talks every week, and I’ve been doing this for quite some time now. I created this list of online talks that I really enjoyed watching. I’ll also be updating this list whenever I’ve watched another awesome talk that is worthy enough. Suggestions are always appreciated through a pull request.

Loren 🤓 blog.graphql.guide

Releasing The GraphQL Guide

John Resig and Loren Sands-Ramshaw first announced the beta of their GraphQL book (discussed here) nearly three years ago. After years of writing and re-writing, it’s now ready to be released. Loren had this to say in the linked announcement post:

This project has taken much longer than we expected, and the length of the book has wound up being much longer than we expected. We’d like to give a huge shout-out to our 740 beta readers who stuck with us through four major versions of the in-progress text.

The GraphQL Guide aims to be the most comprehensive guide to GraphQL, from a beginner introduction to advanced client and server topics.

Go Time Go Time #175

The ultimate guide to crafting your GopherCon proposal

The Call for Proposals for GopherCon 2021 is open from Monday, April 5th to Sunday, April 25th. Kris Brandow, an experienced GopherCon speaker, has published a series of guides to assist Gophers as they craft their proposals and think about submitting.

In this episode Kris reads through his guide, discussing the four parts with a GopherCon newbie, Angelica Hill, who spoke for the first time at GopherCon last year, and is a first time CFP reviewer this year.

Learn a16z.com

The NFT Canon

The NFT Canon is a go-to resource for artists and creators, developers, corporations and institutions, communities and other organizations seeking to understand or do more with non-fungible tokens.

It’s a curated list of readings and resources on all things NFTs (inspired by the a16z Crypto Canon), and is organized from the big picture of what NFTs are and why they matter, to how to mint, collect, and do more with them — including various applications such as art, music, gaming, social tokens, and others.

We will continue to update this as more people try out new things, share their work, or publish resources for learning about NFTs. If you have suggestions for quality pieces to add, let us know @a16z.

A good resource and primer for our upcoming NFT episode of The Changelog with Mikeal Rogers.

Lj Miranda ljvmiranda921.github.io

How to improve software engineering skills as a researcher

In which Lj Miranda proposes an exercise that data scientists can do to learn relevant software skills (with a tangible output in the end).

Create a machine learning application that receives HTTP requests, then deploy it as a containerized app.

I’m willing to wager that this is a worthy goal even if you’re coming from the software engineering side of the spectrum. Don’t worry, he’ll walk you through the steps.

Martin Heinz martinheinz.dev

Let's dive deep into Docker's union file system

Working with Docker CLI is very straightforward - you just build, run, inspect, pull and push containers and images, but have you ever wondered how do the internals behind this Docker interface actually work?

Behind this simple interface hides a lot of cool technologies and in this article you can learn about one of them - the union filesystem - the underlying filesystem behind all the container and image layers.

Mike Bostock observablehq.com

Did I learn anything from 10 years of D3.js?

Mike Bostock celebrates D3’s 10th by reflecting on what he’s learned over the years. There’s a lot to glean from Mike’s reflections. I really enjoyed this sentiment under the “Don’t go it alone” section:

To avoid entrusting your emotional wellbeing to internet randos (see #8), you must develop relationships with a small, stable group of people that you respect. In other words, find a team (or community) that can provide validation, feedback, support, and mentorship. Maybe this is obvious to everyone but me — yes, Mike, friends are good — but I feel like it’s worth repeating today when so much human interaction happens at a distance.

Go Time Go Time #167

The art of reading the docs

Documentation. You can treat it as a dictionary or reference manual that you look up things in when you get stuck during your day-to-day work OR (and this is where things get interesting) you can immerse yourself in a subject, domain, or technology by deeply and purposefully consuming its manuals cover-to-cover to develop expertise, not just passing familiarity.

In this episode we pull in perspectives and anecdotes from beginners and veterans alike to understand the impact of RTFM deeply. Also Sweet Filepath O’ Mine?!?!

0:00 / 0:00