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Mike Bostock observablehq.com

Did I learn anything from 10 years of D3.js?

Mike Bostock celebrates D3’s 10th by reflecting on what he’s learned over the years. There’s a lot to glean from Mike’s reflections. I really enjoyed this sentiment under the “Don’t go it alone” section:

To avoid entrusting your emotional wellbeing to internet randos (see #8), you must develop relationships with a small, stable group of people that you respect. In other words, find a team (or community) that can provide validation, feedback, support, and mentorship. Maybe this is obvious to everyone but me — yes, Mike, friends are good — but I feel like it’s worth repeating today when so much human interaction happens at a distance.

Go Time Go Time #167

The art of reading the docs

Documentation. You can treat it as a dictionary or reference manual that you look up things in when you get stuck during your day-to-day work OR (and this is where things get interesting) you can immerse yourself in a subject, domain, or technology by deeply and purposefully consuming its manuals cover-to-cover to develop expertise, not just passing familiarity.

In this episode we pull in perspectives and anecdotes from beginners and veterans alike to understand the impact of RTFM deeply. Also Sweet Filepath O’ Mine?!?!

Alex Ellis blog.alexellis.io

My first eBook - results & feedback from "Serverless For Everyone Else"

Alex Ellis:

I wanted to write to you all and share that I’ve launched my first eBook called “Serverless For Everyone Else” - within the first three hours of launch, nobody bought a single copy and I thought that I’d got it all wrong.

Alex digs into the gritty details of why he wrote the book and what happened after his initial failure. And since Alex is super nerdy like you and me, the post is filled with fun moments like this one:

How did I fulfil the upgrade / discount? I did it by writing a function and deploying it to my Raspberry Pi, so that Gumroad would send a webhook, my code would query the dollar amount, and then send out an email to the customer over AWS SES.

Samuel Taylor samueltaylor.org

New codebase, who dis?

Samuel Taylor (yes, that Samuel Taylor) shared a few things that works for him when joining a team and learning the codebase.

I have switched teams more often than I have had to implement an AVL tree, and you can guess which one of those two was taught in school. I wish someone had taught me how to join a new team! While learning a new codebase can be daunting, I’ve found a few things that work for me. You should do at least three things when joining a new team. The order of these three can be whatever you like, but all three should be done as soon as reasonably possible.

Chris Kiehl chriskiehl.com

Software development topics I've changed my mind on after 6 years in the industry

I love this post format and may do one myself here soon. It’s just lists of things Chris Kiehl changed his mind on over the years, opinions he’s picked up along the way, and old opinions he hasn’t changed. This opinion made me chuckle:

90% – maybe 93% – of project managers, could probably disappear tomorrow to either no effect or a net gain in efficiency.

Mikel Evins mikelevins.github.io

On REPL-driven programming

Mikel Evins on REPL-driven programming:

Interactive development with a proper repl-driven environment is the exception. Most programming is done in other ways.

As a consequence, there are a lot of programmers out there who’ve never even heard of it, who have no idea that it exists. My intuition is that some fraction of those programmers would prefer well-supported interactive programming, and would benefit from it, if they just knew what it was.

Maybe if enough programmers are exposed to that style of programming then we’ll begin to see new tools that embrace it.

Austin Gil austingil.com

Building better forms for the web

An epic 5-part series on building HTML forms right.

Forms are arguably the most important parts of any web application. Without forms, we would not have sites like Google, Facebook, Amazon, Reddit, etc. However, the more I browse the web, the more I see poor implementations of forms.

In this series, we will examine the proper steps to creating forms for the web, how to think about the code we write, and considerations to make along the way.

Austin plans on turning this series into a full-blown book this year, so expect more from him in this arena very soon.

Command line interface clig.dev

A guide to help you write better CLIs

From the foreword:

Most people today don’t know what the command line is, much less why they would want to bother with it. As computing pioneer Alan Kay said in a 2017 interview, “Because people don’t understand what computing is about, they think they have it in the iPhone, and that illusion is as bad as the illusion that ‘Guitar Hero’ is the same as a real guitar.”

Off to a good start…

Inspired by traditional UNIX philosophy, driven by an interest in encouraging a more delightful and accessible CLI environment, and guided by our experiences as programmers, we decided it was time to revisit the best practices and design principles for building command-line programs.

Go Time Go Time #158

Play with Go

Play with Go is a set of hands-on, interactive tutorials for learning the tools used while programming in Go. In this episode we are joined by its creators, Paul Jolly and Marcos Nils, as we learn more about what motivated the creation of the project, what technology it was built on, and how you can help contribute additional guides to help your fellow gophers!

Learn github.com

A roadmap to becoming an AI expert in 2020

Below you find a set of charts demonstrating the paths that you can take and the technologies that you would want to adopt in order to become a data scientist, machine learning or an ai expert. We made these charts for our new employees to make them AI Experts but we wanted to share them here to help the community.

I didn’t embed the roadmap images because they are too many and too vertical to fit. It sound like an interactive version is Coming Soon™️, but don’t wait on that to get started here. 2020 is almost over. 😉

Learn jemma.dev

Only two hours to learn an entire language?!...Challenge accepted!

I had no idea…have you ever read awk’s entire manual? How long did it take you?

The other day, I was watching Bryan Cantrill’s 2018 talk, Rust, and Other Interesting Things, and he made an offhanded comment while discussing values of different programming languages and communities. He said, “If you get the awk programming language manual…you’ll read it in about two hours and then you’re done. That’s it. You know all of awk.”

Only two hours to learn an entire language?! …. Challenge accepted!

Ruby learnbyexample.github.io

Ruby one-liners cookbook

Ruby is my favorite tool for slightly-longer-than-one-liners, but I don’t often reach for it directly from the command line. This little cookbook might change my mind on that:

A shell utility like bash provides built-in commands and scripting features to make it easier to solve and automate various tasks. External *nix commands like grep, sed, awk, sort, find, parallel etc can be combined to work with each other. Depending upon your familiarity with those tools, you can either use ruby as a single replacement or complement them for specific use cases.

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