InfoQ Icon

InfoQ

InfoQ's mission is to help progressive software development teams adopt new technologies and practices.
infoq.com • 8 Stories
All Sources

InfoQ Icon InfoQ

The status of HTTP/3

HTTP/3 is the next protocol for network communication across the Web, which is meant to partially replace HTTP/1 and HTTP/2. One month before the next QUIC Working Group meeting, to be held in Zurich next February, it may be useful to recap what HTTP/3 promises and what its current client/server support looks like.

It’s been awhile since we discussed QUIC and HTTP/3 with curl’s Daniel Stenberg. A lot has happened since then, and this InfoQ article will do a good job of catching you up. Browser support is still limited, but things are coming along nicely.

InfoQ Icon InfoQ

"Google v. Oracle" to be decided by Supreme Court

The copyright battle that’s been going on since 2010 between these two tech giants will finally reach its conclusion at the highest court in the land.

Google will have just 30 minutes to present its case; Oracle will have 30 minutes to respond… The two tech giants have agreed to the following filing schedule:

  • January 6, 2020 – Google will submit its brief (i.e. argument why they should prevail).
  • February 12, 2020 - Oracle will submit its response brief.
  • March 13, 2020 - Google will file a reply to Oracle’s brief addressing any opposing points raised.

If Google wins, the case is finally closed. If Oracle wins, the damages will be calculated by a California jury. Estimated damages in this case are in the $8-9 billion range.

InfoQ Icon InfoQ

How Apple plans to address the systemic issue that made iOS 13 so buggy

iOS 13’s rollout was soooo buggy. Most notably: backgrounded apps were routinely being killed for no reason. What was to blame?

…Apple top executives Craig Federighi and Stacey Lysik identified iOS daily builds’ instability as the main culprit for iOS 13 bugs. In short, Apple developers were pushing too many unfinished or buggy features to the daily builds. Since new features were active by default, independently of their maturity level, testers had a hard time to actually use their devices, which caused Apple’s buggy releases.

Here’s how they plan to address the problem:

Federighi suggested leaving all new features disabled by default, so testers can ensure no regressions make it into the latest build and avoid being impaired by new bugs. New features shall be enabled on-demand by testers using a new internal Flags menu, making it possible to test each new feature in isolation.

How did it take Apple to the end of 2019 before they discovered feature flags? I hope it helps 🤞

InfoQ Icon InfoQ

A tribute to Joe Armstrong

Following the sad news about Joe Armstrong passing away, some of his former colleagues from Ericsson wrote a good-bye note and asked if InfoQ would publish it.

Joe has been on my shortlist of people to invite on The Changelog for a long time, but I never got around to contacting him. Regretful. This is a touching tribute. I especially enjoyed this bit:

Nobody could avoid being affected by Joe’s good mood and boundless enthusiasm. He was highly appreciated as a speaker and panel member at many international conferences. Many programmers can testify to just how important Joe has been for them in developing their profession.

InfoQ Icon InfoQ

Smoke – Amazon's new, lightweight server-side framework for Swift

When Apple open sourced Swift, it was only a matter of time before the server-side frameworks started rolling out. Perhaps that time is now? Amazon’s entry is called Smoke, and InfoQ has the deets:

Amazon Smoke framework is a new open-source light-weight server-side framework written in Swift and aimed to build REST-like or RPC-like services. Its architecture stresses ease of use and favours a pure-functional programming style for request handlers.

Click through for some code snippets and to learn exactly how Smoke is built (hint: they’re using SwiftNIO)

InfoQ Icon InfoQ

Microsoft adopts Blazor, adds another piece to the WebAssembly/.NET puzzle

.NET is getting ever-closer to running in the browser thanks to Blazor, an experimental web UI framework where you write C#/Razor and HTML and it compiles to WebAssembly.

Blazor started out as a personal project by Microsoft engineer, Steve Sanderson. But now it’s getting the “official” designation and has been moved to the aspnet org on GitHub.

0:00 / 0:00