Mozilla Icon

Mozilla

Mozilla's blog — dispatches from the Internet frontier.
blog.mozilla.org • 11 Stories
All Sources

Mozilla Icon Mozilla

Firefox's new WebSocket inspector

The WebSocket Inspector is part of the existing Network panel UI in DevTools. It’s already possible to filter the content for opened WS connections in this panel, but till now there was no chance to see the actual data transferred through WS frames. This is rad. It’ll ship to all Firefox users in version 71, but it’s available in Firefox Developer Edition today.

read more

Lin Clark Mozilla

WebAssembly interface types: interoperate with all the things!

A look at a new proposal for WebAssembly that will make it possible to easily communicate between WASM and pretty much any language/runtime. This will allow seamlessly embed code from one language into another… think “native modules” except you no longer have to re-compile them on the user’s machine, not to mention you can use them “for free” on the web, and you get sandboxing built in! Wow!

read more

Mozilla Icon Mozilla

Mozilla has published their 2019 Internet Health Report

The report focuses on 5 questions about the internet. Is it safe? How open is it? Who is welcome? Who can succeed? Who controls it? The answer is complicated, and the report doesn’t make any particular conclusions so much as share a series of research & stories about each topic. Includes some fascinating looks at what’s going on in AI, inclusive design, open source, decentralization and more.

read more

Mozilla Icon Mozilla

“Privacy. That’s iPhone” — made us raise our eyebrows

For all our #applenerds out there — a key feature in iPhone has Mozilla worried. According to Ashley Boyd, VP of Advocacy at Mozilla, this key feature is making “their latest slogan ring a bit hollow.” Each iPhone that Apple sells comes with a unique ID (called an “identifier for advertisers” or IDFA), which lets advertisers track the actions users take when they use apps. It’s like a salesperson following you from store to store while you shop and recording each thing you look at. Not very private at all. You can turn the feature off, but “most people don’t know that feature even exists.” Mozilla has an idea of “privacy by default” though…

read more

Mozilla Icon Mozilla

A field guide to open source project archetypes [report]

The problem, as described by James Vasile: Open source is a broad term that encompasses many different types of projects. There is a wide range of open source approaches, and sometimes it helps to think through how your open source approach matches your goals, resources, and environment. In many places we look, we see open source used as a catch-all term to refer to every project. We don’t have a common vocabulary to discuss open source in ways that take account of important differences. Mozilla commissioned a report that attempts to establish that common vocabulary so we can describe open source projects with clarity. Although this report was tailored to advance open source strategies and project design within Mozilla, and with the organizations and communities we work with, we also believe that this challenge is not unique to us. We suspect there will be many other organizations, both commercial and non-commercial, who will benefit from the model. The resulting framework consists of 10 common archetypes. Click through to learn more.

read more

Ashley Willams Mozilla

Hello wasm-pack!

wasm-pack is a tool for assembling and packaging Rust crates that target WebAssembly. These packages can be published to the npm Registry and used alongside other packages. This means you can use them side-by-side with JS and other packages, and in many kind of applications, be it a Node.js server side app, a client-side application bundled by Webpack, or any other sort of application that uses npm dependencies. We’re recording a show with Lin Clark today and will definitely ask her all about the progress Mozilla folks have been making on merging the JavaScript and Rust worlds via WebAssembly. Exciting times!

read more

Mozilla Icon Mozilla

How healthy is the Internet?

Mozilla has released their annual Internet Health Report: Our 2018 compilation of research explains what’s helping and what’s hurting the Internet across five issues, from personal experience to global concerns. The five issues are decentralization, digital inclusion, openness, privacy/security, and web literacy. There’s a lot to digest here. We should expect conversations around these findings to blossom the next few weeks. We might even need to do a show about it…

read more

Mozilla Icon Mozilla

"Project Things" by Mozilla

I recently bought into Samsung’s SmartThings (which is not open), but this open source announcement from Mozilla has me rethinking my choice. Project Things is an open framework for connecting your devices to the web. Let’s welcome the Mozilla IoT team and all their sources to GitHub. Also, check out their Web Thing API spec to see how Mozilla is leading the way to an open standard for IoT.

read more

Mozilla Icon Mozilla

Latest Firefox: faster, with always-on privacy with opt-in Tracking Protection

Mozilla is doing a ton to ensure that people know they are all about privacy and security with the latest release of Firefox. …we believe that privacy is fundamental to a healthy internet. That’s why we build Firefox, and all our products, to give you greater control over the information you share online and the information you share with us. We strive to collect only what we need to improve Firefox for everyone. To enable tracking protection, open preferences and click on “Privacy & Security,” then scroll down to “Tracking Protection” and change that setting to “Always.” 😎 A page you may not know about is Mozilla’s full-disclosure privacy page for Firefox that includes explanations and details on what data Firefox shares and how you can change your settings to share even less. This page is auto-opened when you first install and launch Firefox.

read more

Mozilla Icon Mozilla

Mozilla Files Suit Against FCC to Protect Net Neutrality

Thank you to Mozilla for standing behind their mission to “create products and policy to keep the internet in service of people, not profit”. As we have said many times over the years, we’ll keep fighting for the open internet to ensure everyone has access to the entire internet and do everything in our power to protect net neutrality. In addition to our court challenge, we are also taking steps to ask Congress and the courts to fix the broken policies.

read more

0:00 / 0:00