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Amazon Web Services Medium (via Scribe)

We reduced our server costs 80% by moving away from AWS

Zsot Varga explains how Prerender saved $800k annually by removing their reliance on AWS and building in-house infrastructure to handle traffic and cached data. This was no minor migration, and it took months to pull off, but it’s a solid lesson in testing your assumptions.

The cloud (which is AWS in most cases) is the default for most businesses today. That’s a good starting place for many reasons, but once you get up and going you may find it’s not the best choice for your business, like the folks at Prerender learned.

PostgreSQL github.com

An open source alternative to AWS Aurora

When we had Paul Copplestone from Supabase on The Changelog I asked him what a cloud native Postgres would look like. He replied,

Decoupled compute and storage. So the idea is that you should be able to attach the compute part of it to a storage, hopefully like an infinite storage; you know, anything that is infinitely scalable. If you can do this, and in particular, if the compute can start up very fast, maybe in, say, a hundred milliseconds via some sort of HTTP response, then that’s cloud native, yeah.

Enter Neon, which sells itself as:

The multi-cloud fully managed Postgres with a generous free tier. We separated storage and compute to offer autoscaling, branching, and bottomless storage.

Behind this new business from MemSQL co-founder Nikita Shamgunov is the linked (Apache-licensed) server written in Rust.

Cloud swyx.io

AWS is playing Chess. Cloudflare is playing Go

Shawn (swyx) Wang lays out Cloudflare’s strategy to disrupt the cloud from the outside in:

While the tech industry is used to come-from-below disruption, and the software industry is increasingly grasping class-for-the-masses atomic concepts, I believe Cloudflare is writing a new playbook that is the little-guy counterpart of the embrace, extend, extinguish model used by Microsoft.

Chris Fidao laravel-news.com

Mistakes I've made in AWS

Chris Fidao:

I’ve been using AWS “professionally” since about 2015. In that time, I’ve made lots of mistakes.

Other than occasionally deleting production data, the mistakes all arose from ignorance - there’s so much to know about AWS that it’s easy to miss something important.

Here’s a collection of the most commonly missed things when using AWS with Laravel Forge!

Learning from your mistakes is powerful. Learning from other people’s mistakes can be just as powerful without the major drawback of, you know, feeling all that pain!

Amazon Web Services github.com

You can now run Amazon EKS on your own infra

Amazon EKS Anywhere is a new deployment option for Amazon EKS that enables you to easily create and operate Kubernetes clusters on-premises with your own virtual machines. It brings a consistent AWS management experience to your data center, building on the strengths of Amazon EKS Distro, the same distribution of Kubernetes that powers EKS on AWS. Its goal is to include full lifecycle management of multiple Kubernetes clusters that are capable of operating completely independently of any AWS services.

API pirateweather.net

A weather forecast API to replace Dark Sky's

You may have heard that Dark Sky (the beloved weather app for iOS) was acquired by Apple and its accompanying developer API will be shut down soon, which left a lot of devs scrambling for alternatives. Enter the PirateWeather API:

Weather forecasts are primarily determined using models run by government agencies, but the outputs aren’t easy to use or in formats built for applications. To try to address this, I’ve put together a service (built on AWS Lambda) that reads public weather forecasts and serves it following the Dark Sky API style.

It’s in beta at the moment, but it appears the author has put a lot of thought into it.

Amazon Web Services aws.amazon.com

Introducing OpenSearch (renamed from Amazon Elasticsearch Service)

From the AWS open source blog:

Today, we are introducing the OpenSearch project, a community-driven, open source fork of Elasticsearch and Kibana. We are making a long-term investment in OpenSearch to ensure users continue to have a secure, high-quality, fully open source search and analytics suite with a rich roadmap of new and innovative functionality. This project includes OpenSearch (derived from Elasticsearch 7.10.2) and OpenSearch Dashboards (derived from Kibana 7.10.2). Additionally, the OpenSearch project is the new home for our previous distribution of Elasticsearch (Open Distro for Elasticsearch), which includes features such as enterprise security, alerting, machine learning, SQL, index state management, and more. All of the software in the OpenSearch project is released under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (ALv2).

Did you listen to our epic Elastic vs AWS episode on The Changelog? I’d really love to hear from the community on this subject…is this a good thing or a bad thing for open source at large? Why didn’t AWS just work with Elasticsearch (the company)?

We plan to rename our existing Amazon Elasticsearch Service to Amazon OpenSearch Service.

Elasticsearch aws.amazon.com

AWS forks Elasticsearch and Kibana as license changes

Ever since AWS took Elasticsearch and decided to sell a managed version of it there has been controversy around AWS and Elasticsearch. Now that the software created by Elastic is being switched to the Server-Side Public License
(SSPL), which is not a very permissive license, AWS is going ahead and forking the projects.

The debate rages around this. Few people feel sympathy with the behemoth that is AWS, but they don’t seem to be in violation of any licenses. Elastic have definitely worked hard on Elasticsearch and arguably deserves an opportunity to profit from their work. This new license raises significant concern though.

I don’t think we’ll see this settle anytime soon, just like the issue of open source sustainability is neither easy nor straightforward.

Amazon Web Services github.com

An opinionated full-stack boilerplate for production AWS apps

The primary objective of this boilerplate is to give you a production ready code that reduces the amount of time you would normally have to spend on system infrastructure’s configuration. It contains a number of services that a typical web application has (frontend, backend api, admin panel, workers) as well as their continuous deployment. Using this boilerplate you can deploy multiple environments, each representing a different stage in your pipeline.

An opinionated full-stack boilerplate for production AWS apps

Amazon Web Services adayinthelifeof.nl

AWS services explained in one line each

there are a lot of AWS services available. And I do mean: a LOT. Currently, there are 163 (!) different services that are available from the Amazon Dashboard, each with their own way of working, difficulties, catches and best practises.

What follows is one-line descriptions of all 163 AWS services. MSK? Kafka as a service. Amazon Connect? AWS call center platform. And so on.

Amazon Web Services github.com

The missing cron CLI for AWS Cloudwatch and Lambda

Do you have an AWS account? Great. Do you want to run cron jobs in the cloud?

Cronyo provides A simple CLI to manage your cron jobs on AWS.

In addition, Cronyo can instantly deploy a couple of super-simple, helpful and secure lambda functions to perform HTTP GET/POST requests for you. So if you need to trigger any webhooks on schedule, an AWS account and Cronyo is all you need :)

Amazon Web Services github.com

A serverless email server on AWS using S3 and SES

This stack was created out of frustration due to the fact that to this day there’s no easy way to have a full email server without the overhead of installing and configuring all servers needed to handle incoming and outgoing messages. We wanted something simple, with no interface and no server management, so we came up with S3-Email. This included AWS SES as our email server (receive and send) and S3 as our database and interface. Then we tied everything together with a bit of code via AWS Lambda.

All of this functionality and the repo is just some JSON, Yaml, and text files. Maybe 2020 really is the year of #nocode… 😉

Amazon Web Services aws.amazon.com

Announcing PartiQL: one query language for all your data

Today we are happy to announce PartiQL, a SQL-compatible query language that makes it easy to efficiently query data, regardless of where or in what format it is stored. As long as your query engine supports PartiQL, you can process structured data from relational databases (both transactional and analytical), semi-structured and nested data in open data formats (such as an Amazon S3 data lake), and even schema-less data in NoSQL or document databases that allow different attributes for different rows.

Announcing PartiQL: one query language for all your data
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