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Amazon Web Services aws.amazon.com

Announcing PartiQL: one query language for all your data

Today we are happy to announce PartiQL, a SQL-compatible query language that makes it easy to efficiently query data, regardless of where or in what format it is stored. As long as your query engine supports PartiQL, you can process structured data from relational databases (both transactional and analytical), semi-structured and nested data in open data formats (such as an Amazon S3 data lake), and even schema-less data in NoSQL or document databases that allow different attributes for different rows.

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Ev Kontsevoy gravitational.com

Rolling your own servers with Kubernetes (goodbye AWS)

Why Kubernetes? Should you roll your own servers? Should you go off the cloud? If you’ve listened to The Changelog #344 — where we cover the details of Changelog.com’s 2019 infrastructure with special guest Gerhard Lazu — then you’ll know the answer to these questions. But if not, as you might assume, I recommend listening to that episode and reading this post from Ev, in that order. In this three-part blog series, we’ll try to address some of the fears and uncertainties faced by organizations who had successfully started their projects on public clouds, like AWS, but for one reason or another found themselves needing to replicate their cloud environment from scratch, starting with an empty rack in their own enterprise server room or a colocation facility.

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Julian Tellez github.com

Lambcycle – a declarative lambda middleware with life cycle hooks

Lambcycle is a middleware for lambda functions. It defines a configurable life-cycle and allows you to focus on your application’s logic. It has a “Feature as Plugin” approach, so you can easily create your own plugins or reuse your favorite packages with very little effort 🐑 🛵. The author goes deep on why Lambcycle solves a serious problem over on Medium.

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Amazon Web Services enterprisedb.com

Is Amazon’s new MongoDB-compatible DBMS really PostgreSQL under the covers?

This is a nice rundown of the technical clues indicating that DocumentDB might be powered by Postgres. PostgreSQL isn’t the only DBMS that scales writes vertically and reads horizontally via replication, but when you add this all up, especially some of the specific limitations, I think it makes a pretty compelling argument that PostgreSQL is the engine powering AWS DocumentDB.

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John Demian dashbird.io

AWS Lambda limitations explained

John Demian lays out Lambda’s runtime environment limitations for your consideration. I gave Lambda a chance to impress me after Pam Selle gave us the hard sell, but I hit up against the 5-minute function execution timeout. Needless to say I was not impressed. It’s nice to see they’ve increased that to 15 minutes, but there are other constraints to consider as well.

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Amazon Web Services awslabs.github.io

Find CloudFormation difficult to work with? Ditch YAML/JSON with AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK)

The AWS CDK is an infrastructure modeling framework that allows you to define your cloud resources using an imperative programming interface. The CDK is currently in developer preview. We look forward to community feedback and collaboration. If you’re developing for AWS and using CloudFormation, and you feel that YAML and/or JSON templates are too restrictive, CDK will allow you to programmatically define your stack. CDK provides strong typed resources for Java, .Net, and TypeScript, as well as JavaScript support. You can even augment it by creating your own constructs and create your own DSL on top of CloudFormation!

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Cristian Magherusan-Stanciu github.com

Lower your AWS costs (up to 90%!) by automating the use of spot instances

If you’re using EC2 and paying big bucks to do so, you owe it to yourself to check out AutoSpotting: Once installed and enabled by tagging existing on-demand AutoScaling groups, AutoSpotting gradually replaces their on-demand instances with spot instances that are usually much cheaper, at least as large and identically configured to the group’s members, without changing the group configuration in any way. For your peace of mind, you can also keep running a configurable number of on-demand instances given as percentage or absolute number.

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