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Ship It! Ship It! #69

The cloud native ecosystem

Maybe it’s the Californian sun. Or perhaps it’s the time spent at Disney Studios, the home of the best stories. One thing is for sure: Taylor Dolezal is one of the happiest cloud native people that Gerhard knows.

As a former Lead SRE for Disney Studios, Taylor has significant hands-on experience running cloud native technologies in a large company. After a few years as a HashiCorp Developer Advocate, Taylor is now Head of End User Ecosystem at CNCF. In his current role, he is helping enable cloud native success for end-users like Boeing, Mercedes Benz & many others.

Cloud resoto.com

Resoto is a meta layer on top of your cloud infra

As best I can tell, this provides simplified search across your infra, generates reports so you can easily audit resource usage, and lets you create/trigger jobs such as cleaning up unused resources and enforcing tag structures.

The search looks pretty powerful and you can pipe search results directly to jobs for quick processing:

search is(resource) and tags.owner==null | tag update owner "John Doe"

The Changelog The Changelog #501

The power of eBPF

eBPF is a revolutionary kernel technology that has lit the cloud native world on fire. If you’re going to have one person explain the excitement, that person would be Liz Rice. Liz is the COSO at Isovalent, creators of the open source Cilium project and pioneers of eBPF tech.

On this episode Liz tells Jerod all about the power of eBPF, where it came from, what kind of new applications its enabling, and who is building the next generation of networking, security, and observability tools with it.

Ship It! Ship It! #65

Two thumbs up for the Cool Wall

Tammer Saleh, founder of Super Orbital, a tiny team of exceptional Kubernetes engineers and teachers, is joining us today to talk about what is cool in the Cloud Native world. Yes, it’s the same Tammer that we had the pleasure of on shipit.show/31 - Is Kubernetes a platform?

In today’s episode, we also cover two great blog posts:

  1. Zero to GitOps: Terraform and the AWS EKS Blueprints project by Sean Kane
  2. Hunting Down an Intermittent Failure in Cilium by James McShane

We wrap up with ✨ The Cool Wall of Cloud Native ✨

Ship It! Ship It! #63

KubeVelo 2022

We know that many of you listen to this podcast while running 🏃‍♀️ or cycling 🚴‍♂️ Hey Dan!

How many of you cycled to a conference? Gerhard knows a single person that cycled 764 miles for 8 days straight from Switzerland to Spain for this year’s KubeCon EU. His name is Johann Gyger, a CNCF ambassador & a cloud consultant at Peak Scale. Johann is a cloud engineer at heart that is all in on sustainability. He is the main reason why Gerhard is super excited to talk about electric cars & Dagger at the Swiss Cloud Native Day this September.

Jerod Santo changelog.com/posts

SQLite's web renaissance

I won’t call SQLite’s current moment a comeback, because the most used database engine in the world doesn’t have anything to come back from. I’m going with “renaissance”, because despite its already mass adoption, there has been something of a rebirth of interest from one software sector that had previously relegated it to dev & test environments: web apps

Cloud github.com

Store files as YouTube videos == infinite disk space

YouTubeDrive is a Wolfram Language (aka Mathematica) package that encodes/decodes arbitrary data to/from simple RGB videos which are automatically uploaded to/downloaded from YouTube. Since YouTube imposes no limits on the total number or length of videos users can upload, this provides an effectively infinite but extremely slow form of file storage.

Filed under: ways-no-youtube-engineer-ever-imagined-people-would-use-their-software

Rust github.com

A cross-platform file explorer powered by a virtual distributed filesystem

Spacedrive helps you organize your files across many devices in one place. Here’s the motivation:

Many of us have multiple cloud accounts, drives that aren’t backed up and data at risk of loss. We depend on cloud services like Google Photos and iCloud, but are locked in with limited capacity and almost zero interoperability between services and operating systems. Photo albums shouldn’t be stuck in a device ecosystem, or harvested for advertising data. They should be OS agnostic, permanent and personally owned. Data we create is our legacy, that will long outlive us—open source technology is the only way to ensure we retain absolute control over the data that defines our lives, at unlimited scale.

A cross-platform file explorer powered by a virtual distributed filesystem

Cloud rohanrd.xyz

Why you should start self hosting

A short, cogent argument why hosting your own cloud services is worth the time/effort:

Consider this, you carefully curate your playlists on Spotify but every now and then you see a certain song missing from your playlist. Same goes for videos saved in your YouTube playlists or other music/video streaming services. Then there is also the case of OTT streaming platforms where the show you were going to watch over weekend has now disappeared.

The author points to r/selfhosted and this awesome self hosted list as good resources to get started.

Rich Burroughs loft.sh

7 open source cloud native tools that aren’t Kubernetes

Rich Burroughs:

When you hear the phrase “cloud native,” is Kubernetes the first thing that comes to your mind? It is for me, and I expect I’m not alone. Kubernetes is now the second-largest open source project after Linux, and it’s the big fish in the cloud native pond. But there are many other projects in the CNCF landscape and the broader cloud native community.

So, I thought I’d list some cloud native tools that can be very useful for teams that aren’t using Kubernetes or aren’t using it for every workload. Here are 7 of them that I like a lot.

If Rich’s name rings a bell, that’s because he was just on Ship It! last week. 😉

PostgreSQL github.com

Building a cloud native storage engine for Postgres

One of the things we discussed with Paul Copplestone from Supabase was what, exactly, might a cloud native Postgres look like? Well, perhaps it will look like OrioleDB:

A new storage engine for PostgreSQL, bringing a modern approach to database capacity, capabilities and performance to the world’s most-loved database platform.

OrioleDB consists of an extension, building on the innovative table access method framework and other standard Postgres extension interfaces. By extending and enhancing the current table access methods, OrioleDB opens the door to a future of more powerful storage models that are optimized for cloud and modern hardware architectures.

Cloud garagehq.deuxfleurs.fr

Garage - a self-hosted distributed object storage solution

Garage is a distributed storage solution, that automatically replicates your data on several servers. Garage takes into account the geographical location of servers, and ensures that copies of your data are located at different locations when possible for maximal redundancy, a unique feature in the landscape of distributed storage systems.

It has an S3-compatible API and can be used as a storage backend for things like NextCloud, Matrix, and Mastodon. It’s being built by a non-profit in France that is “working to promote self-hosting and small-scale hosting.” Why do they do this?

self-hosting means running our own hardware at home, and providing 24/7 Internet services from there. We have many reasons for doing this. One is because this is the only way we can truly control who has access to our data. Another one is that it helps us be aware of the physical substrate of which the Internet is made: making the Internet run has an environmental cost which we want to evaluate and keep under control. The physical hardware also gives us a sense of community, calling to mind all of the people that could currently be connected and making use of our services, and reminding us of the purpose for which we are doing this.

Troy Hunt troyhunt.com

How I got pwned by my cloud costs

Troy Hunt (of Have I been Pwned fame) has been a vocal proponent of cloud-first services for awhile. Last December, that strategy came back to bite him:

It all started with my monthly Azure bill for December which was way over what it would normally be. It only took a moment to find the problem…

He goes on to tell the tale in excruciating detail. Be careful out there, cloud natives.

Shawn Wang swyx.io

AWS is playing Chess. Cloudflare is playing Go

Shawn (swyx) Wang lays out Cloudflare’s strategy to disrupt the cloud from the outside in:

While the tech industry is used to come-from-below disruption, and the software industry is increasingly grasping class-for-the-masses atomic concepts, I believe Cloudflare is writing a new playbook that is the little-guy counterpart of the embrace, extend, extinguish model used by Microsoft.

Ship It! Ship It! #19

Real-world implications of shipping many times a day

This week Emile Vauge, founder & CEO of Traefik, joins Gerhard to share a story that started as a solution to a 2000 microservices challenge, the real-world implications of shipping many times a day for years, and the difficulties of sustaining an inclusive and healthy open-source community while building a product company.

Working every day on keeping the open-source community in sync with the core team was an important lesson. The second learning was around big changes between major versions.

The journey from Travis CI to Circle CI, then to Semaphore CI and eventually GitHub Actions is an interesting one. The automation tools inspired by the Mymirca ant colony is a fascinating idea, executed well. There is more to discover in the episode.

The Changelog The Changelog #459

Coding in the cloud with Codespaces

On this special edition of The Changelog, we’re talking with Cory Wilkerson, Senior Director of Engineering at GitHub, about GitHub Codespaces. For years now, the possibility of coding in the cloud seemed so close, yet so far away for a number of reasons. According to Cory, the raw ingredients to make coding in the cloud a reality have been there for years. The challenge has really been how the industry thinks, and we are now at a place where the skepticism in cloud based workflows is “non-existent.”

After 15 months in preview, GitHub not only announced the availability of Codespaces for Teams and Enterprise — they also showcased their internal adoption, with 600 of their 1,000 engineers using it daily to develop GitHub.com.

On this episode, Cory shares the full backstory of that journey and a peek into the future where we’re all coding in the cloud.

Ship It! Ship It! #15

Assemble all your infrastructure

In this episode, Gerhard follows up on The Changelog #375, which is the last time that he spoke Crossplane with Dan and Jared. Many things changed since then, such as abstractions and compositions, as well as using Crossplane to build platforms, which were mostly ideas.

Fast forward 18 months, 2k changes, as well as a major version, and Crossplane is now an easy choice - some would say the best choice - for platform teams to declare what infrastructure means to them. You can now use Crossplane to define your infrastructure abstractions across multiple vendors, including AWS, GCP & Equinix Metal. The crazy ideas from 2019 are now bold and within reach. Gerhard also has an idea for the changelog.com 2022 setup. Listen to what Jared & Dan think, and then let us know your thoughts too.

Alex Ellis blog.alexellis.io

The Internet is my computer

In 1984 John Gage of Sun Microsystems was credited as saying “The Network is the computer.” Almost four decades ago, John had a vision of distributed systems working together to be greater than the sum of their parts.

For this article, I surveyed the land of hosted IDEs and it turns out that we’ve progressed beyond running VS Code on an iPad whilst sipping a cocktail.

You can still do that, but there’s way more to it today and I’ll take you through some of use-cases and add my own thoughts. There’s also a practical guide at the end to get started with the open source VS Code browser by Coder.

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