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Docker gitlab.com

Harbormaster – easily deploy many Docker-Compose apps on a single host

Here’s their pitch:

Do you have a home server you want to run a few apps on, but don’t want everything to
break every time you upgrade the OS? Do you want automatic updates but don’t want to buy
an extra 4 servers so you can run Kubernetes?

Do you have a work server that you want to run a few small services on, but don’t want
to have to manually manage it? Do you find that having every deployment action be in
a git repo more tidy?

Harbormaster is for you.

You create a YAML config file with all the git repos you want it to include and it’ll watch them for changes (on a timer) and do the necessary cloning/pulling, service restarting, etc. that needs doing to make it all run. Simple. Neat!

Ivan Velichko iximiuz.com

DevOps, SRE, and Platform Engineering

Ivan Velichko:

I compiled this thread on Twitter, and all of a sudden, it got quite some attention. So here, I’ll try to elaborate on the topic a bit more. Maybe it would be helpful for someone trying to make a career decision or just improve general understanding of the most hyped titles in the industry.

Titles come and go, and it’s worth knowing which ones are coming and which ones are going. This article is a good place to catch up if you haven’t been tracking. Oh, and there’s a pod for that too. 😉

Zach Bloomquist zach.bloomqu.ist

Reliable, deliverable, self-hosted email

This sounds too good to be true, because it kind of is. There is no escaping the cloud (because of email trust) or the requirement of sysadmin’ing this setup (sending/receiving email is critical). If you slack on the details or upkeep, it’s your email.

I have been on an ongoing quest to free myself from cloud services for years now. During this time, I have hosted my personal email (@bloomqu.ist) on a Google Apps G Suite Google Workspace account, which, while convenient, also means that my personal emails are at the whims of one of the world’s most privacy-hostile companies.

Don’t get me wrong – what Zach shared is quite possible, but it’s still too time consuming and difficult to host your own email. It’s untenable long-term. There’s a billion dollar business there waiting for someone to seriously compete with Google on email, and not be evil. Fastmail comes to mind. I could be wrong, but I would characterize them as being an alternative, not seriously competing with Google.

Ops incident.io

Incidents are for everyone

A perspective on incidents that makes a lot of sense actually, and captures the “Why?” perfectly. My highlights: Incidents involve more people than we think. Tooling just makes it really hard for them to help. We have more incidents than we realise. We just don’t hear about them. Your whole team, on the same team. Practice makes perfect.

Ops tech.channable.com

Nix is the ultimate DevOps toolkit

At Channable we use Nix to build and deploy our services and to manage our development environments. This was not always the case: in the past we used a combination of ecosystem-specific tools and custom scripts to glue them together. Consolidating everything with Nix has helped us standardize development and deployment workflows, eliminate “works on my machine”-problems, and avoid unnecessary rebuilds. In this post we want to share what problems we encountered before adopting Nix, how Nix solves those, and how we gradually introduced Nix into our workflows.

If Nix is intriguing to you, you’re going to love an upcoming episode of The Changelog. 😉

HackerNoon Icon HackerNoon

Why ML in production is (still) broken and ways we can fix it

Hamza Tahir on HackerNoon:

By now, chances are you’ve read the famous paper about hidden technical debt by Sculley et al. from 2015. As a field, we have accepted that the actual share of Machine Learning is only a fraction of the work going into successful ML projects. The resulting complexity, especially in the transition to “live” environments, lead to large amounts of failed ML projects never reaching production.

Productionizing ML workflows has been a trending topic on Practical AI lately…

Why ML in production is (still) broken and ways we can fix it

Machine Learning huyenchip.com

The MLOps tooling landscape in early 2021 (284 tools)

Chip Huyen:

While looking for these MLOps tools, I discovered some interesting points about the MLOps landscape:

  1. Increasing focus on deployment
  2. The Bay Area is still the epicenter of machine learning, but not the only hub
  3. MLOps infrastructures in the US and China are diverging
  4. More interests in machine learning production from academia

If MLOps is new to you, Practical AI did a deep dive on the topic that will help you sort it out. Or if you’d prefer a shallow dive… just watch this.

Gerhard Lazu changelog.com/posts

The new changelog.com setup for 2020

In this post I share the latest 2020 and beyond details for changelog.com’s infrastructure.

Why Kubernetes? How is Kubernetes simpler than what we had before? What was our journey to running production on Kubernetes? What worked well? What could have been better? What comes next for changelog.com? Read this post and listen to episode #419 to learn all the details.

Ops grafana.com

Grafana Tempo is a high volume, distributed tracing backend

Tempo is cost-efficient, requiring only object storage to operate, and is deeply integrated with Grafana, Prometheus, and Loki. Tempo can be used with any of the open source tracing protocols, including Jaeger, Zipkin, and OpenTelemetry. It supports key/value lookup only and is designed to work in concert with logs and metrics (exemplars) for discovery.

Add this to the incredibly impressive open source portfolio at Grafana Labs.

Kubernetes keel.sh

Keel is a tool for automating Kubernetes deployment updates

kubectl is the new SSH. If you are using it to update production workloads, you are doing it wrong. See examples on how to automate application updates.

We’re using this in our new Kubernetes-based infrastructure (more details on that coming to a podcast near you). Keel runs as a single container, scanning Kubernetes and Helm releases for outdated images. Super cool stuff, and even has a web interface (which we’re not using yet, but should).

Keel is a tool for automating Kubernetes deployment updates

Terminal github.com

What's new in htop 3

Everyone’s (or at least my) favorite system monitoring tool is still alive and kickin’ with a big 3.0 release. In addition to a new display option to show CPU frequency in CPU meters, optional vim key mapping mode, and many other goodies, the big news is this:

New maintainers - after a prolonged period of inactivity from Hisham, the creator and original maintainer, a team of community maintainers have volunteered to take over a fork at htop.dev and github.com/htop-dev to keep the project going.

Open source FTW!

More good news: Hisham has agreed to join us on Maintainer Spotlight!

Ops github.com

Quickly spin up local development environments with Lando

This tool is surrounded by mountains of marketing speak, but it does seem like it offers a quick way to spin up different dev environments, which is cool. It has built-in recipes for WordPress, Drupal, LAMP, MEAN, and more. Here’s how you get started on Drupal 7, for example:

lando init \
  --source remote \
  --remote-url https://ftp.drupal.org/files/projects/drupal-7.59.tar.gz \
  --remote-options="--strip-components 1" \
  --recipe drupal7 --webroot . \
  --name hello-drupal7

You can use these out of the box or start with a base language and mix in the things you need from there. Kinda like Docker Compose? Yeah, kinda like Docker Compose:

You can think of Lando as both an abstraction layer and superset of Docker Compose as well as a Docker Compose utility.

The New Stack Icon The New Stack

The 3 myths of observability

Arijit Mukherji on The New Stack:

We all have our favorite urban legends. From cow tipping to chupacabras, these myths persist despite a lack of definitive proof (and often evidence to the contrary). Technology isn’t immune to this phenomenon. It has its own set of urban legends and myths that emerge alongside new technologies and continue well into mass adoption. As organizations consider the shift from monitoring to Observability, I hear three common misperceptions. It’s time to debunk the myths.

Callback: Observability is for your unknown unknowns

Linux devconnected.com

The complete system administrator guide to Syslog

If you are a system administrator, or just a regular Linux user, there is a very high chance that you worked with Syslog, at least one time. On your Linux system, pretty much everything related to system logging is linked to the Syslog protocol. Designed in the early 80’s by Eric Allman (from Berkeley University), the syslog protocol is a specification that defines a standard for message logging on any system.

This is pitched as “everything that you need to know about Syslog.” From what I can tell, it might just live up to that pitch. It’s high quality and thorough.

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