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GraphQL

GraphQL is a query language for APIs and a runtime for fulfilling those queries with your existing data.
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Patrick DeVivo github.com

A fluent GraphQL library for Go

This package wraps the graphql-go/graphql implementation to provide a “fluent” pattern for constructing GraphQL queries in Go. This can be valuable in situations where dynamic queries are desired: when the fields of a GraphQL query (or mutation) are not known until runtime. For most other use cases, plain query strings or a helper library such as this should be sufficient.

I wonder if this would change Mislav’s unpopular GraphQL/Go opinion

GraphQL supabase.com

A native GraphQL extension for PostgreSQL

The Supabase folks have open sourced a work-in-progress native PostgreSQL extension adding GraphQL support. First, they surveyed the field and liked what they saw from Graphile and Hasura, but…

we host free-tier projects on VMs with 1 GB of memory. After tallying the resources reserved for PostgreSQL, PostgREST, Kong, GoTrue, and a handful of smaller services, we were left with a total memory budget of … 0 MB 😬. Unsurprisingly, our pathological memory target disqualified any option that required launching another process in those VMs.

By their estimates, this effort will reduces the platform’s memory requirements by 525 TB/hours every month. Seems worth it!

Shruti Kapoor Medium (via Scribe)

The story of PayPal's adoption of GraphQL

From Shruti Kapoor on PayPal’s technology blog:

We started our GraphQL adoption journey by building our checkout experience. We saw tremendous benefits in adopting GraphQL when our checkout app built with GraphQL became our guiding light.We built more apps, provided infrastructure support, launched a public GraphQL API, and provided trainings and learning materials across the company. We also set up a standards body, provided a GraphQL tools fanny pack, and built sample apps to help teams get started.

Today, GraphQL is being used by several production apps across PayPal. It is now a default pattern to use GraphQL for building new UI apps. Many existing apps are in the process of migrating to GraphQL.

Loren 🤓 blog.graphql.guide

Releasing The GraphQL Guide

John Resig and Loren Sands-Ramshaw first announced the beta of their GraphQL book (discussed here) nearly three years ago. After years of writing and re-writing, it’s now ready to be released. Loren had this to say in the linked announcement post:

This project has taken much longer than we expected, and the length of the book has wound up being much longer than we expected. We’d like to give a huge shout-out to our 740 beta readers who stuck with us through four major versions of the in-progress text.

The GraphQL Guide aims to be the most comprehensive guide to GraphQL, from a beginner introduction to advanced client and server topics.

GraphQL github.com

Mordred brings Gatsby's "source data from anywhere" idea to the rest of us

One of Gatsby’s greatest virtues is how it normalizes all data sources through its source plugin architecture. This is cool because it gives you a unified access layer for everything from the file system to 3rd-party APIs to headless CMSes.

Kevin Titor must’ve liked the idea enough that he’s bringing it to other frameworks that support static site generation (Next.js, Nuxt.js, Eleventy, etc.). The main thing missing from Mordred is a community creating plugins for popular CMSes and services; a great way to get involved!

JavaScript github.com

A Minecraft clone built entirely with JS

Having to open an additional app to play a game is sometimes too tiring. Therefore, I thought it’d be interesting to somehow implement Minecraft with javascript, essentially bringing the whole Minecraft game into the web. This not only takes away the tedious process of installing the game, it also brings the entire game to players within a couple clicks.

Words cannot describe how much I adore the thought that building this extremely ambitious piece of software was a better alternative to the tedious process of installing the game. 😆

A Minecraft clone built entirely with JS

JS Party JS Party #85

Building PizzaQL at the age of 16

Jerod, Mikeal, and Feross welcome Antoni Kepinski to the show to discuss his open source pizza ordering management web app. We talk about learning programming at a young age, how overwhelming web development can be these days, how Antoni decided which technologies to use, and more. This is a super fun conversation with many insights and takeaways for developers at every stage of their career.

GraphQL nilan.netlify.com

GraphQL trends in 2019

GraphQL is exploding in popularity, and I love to see it getting moved out of Facebook and becoming a clearly independent project. Neat to see all the stuff happening in the community around it.

The GraphQL Foundation announcement last year was another reassurance that GraphQL is here to stay, after Facebook granted full patent rights to all GraphQL users two years ago.

While the legal situation around GraphQL is in the clear now, 4 years after its open-source release, the best practices and developments surrounding the still-emerging technology are still rapidly evolving.

If you like this stuff, you might also like a couple episodes of JSParty. Episode #38 is an interview with John Resig about GraphQL, while episode #72 is a panel discussion on the evolution of state management, including GraphQL.

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