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Kris Brandow

New York, New York · Twitter · GitHub

The Changelog The Changelog #504

Building actually maintainable software ♻️

This week we’re sharing the most popular episode of Go Time from last year — Go Time #196. We believe this episode was the most popular because it’s all about building actually maintainable software and what goes into that. Kris Brandow is joined by Johnny Boursiquot, Ian Lopshire, and Sam Boyer. There’s lots of hot takes, disagreements, and unpopular opinions.

This is part two of a three part mini-series led by Kris on maintenance. Make sure you check out Go Time #195 and Go Time #202 to continue the series.

Go Time Go Time #229

What to do when projects get big and messy

Another entry in the maintenance series! Throughout the series we’ve discussed building versus buying, building actually maintainable software, maintaining ourselves, open source maintenance, legacy code, and most recently Go project structure. In this 7th installment of the series, we continue narrowing our focus by talking about what to do when projects get big and messy.

Go Time Go Time

The funny bits from 2021

Here’s a little bonus episode before we get back to your regularly scheduled Go Time. We’re calling it the funny bits. It’s a compilation of times we cracked up making the show for y’all. If you dig it, holler at Jerod. If you don’t, email Mat Ryer.

Go Time Go Time #207

Maintenance in the open

Open Source and other source available projects have been a huge driver of progress in our industry, but building and maintaining an open source project is about a lot more than just writing the initial code and putting together a good README. On this episode of the maintenance mini-series, we’ll be discussing open source and the maintenance required to keep it going.

Go Time Go Time #204

Discussing Go's annual developer survey

Each year a group of user researchers and the Go team get together and create a survey for the Go community. The results of the survey are analyzed and turned into a report made available to everyone in the Go community. In this episode we sit down with Alice Merrick and Todd Kulesza to discuss the survey, how it’s made, and some of the interesting results from this year’s survey.

Go Time Go Time #198

The little known team that keeps Go going

Ever wonder how new features get added to the go command? Or where tools like gopls come from? Well, there’s an open team that handles just those things.

Just like the programming language itself, many of the tools that Go engineers use everyday are discussed and developed in the open. In this episode we’ll talk about this team, how it started, where it’s going, and how you can get involved.

Go Time Go Time #189

Do devs need a product manager?

What is a Product Manager, and do Engineers need them? In this episode, we will be discussing what a Product Manager does, what makes a good Product Manager, and debating if engineering teams truly need them, with some tech companies going without them. We are joined by Gaëlle Sharma, Senior Technical Product Manager, at the New York Times, leading the Identity group.

Go Time Go Time #188

SIV and the V2+ issue

Go modules brought about quite a few changes to the Go ecosystem. One of those changes is semantic import versioning (SIV), which has a fairly pronounced effect on how libraries are identified. In this episode we are joined by Tim Heckman and Peter Bourgon to discuss some of the downsides to these changes and how it has lead to what a subset of the Go community refers to as the “v2+ problem.”

Go Time Go Time #179

Event-driven systems

In this episode we talk with Daniel and Steve about their experience with event-driven systems and shed some light on what they are and who they might be for. We explore topics like the complexity of setting up an event-driven system, the need to embrace eventual consistency, useful tools for building event-driven systems, and more.

Go Time Go Time #176

TCP & UDP

The internet wouldn’t exist as we know it if it weren’t for TCP and UDP, yet many developers don’t quite understand the technology powering the web. In this episode we talk with Adam Woodbeck, author of Network Programming with Go, to learn about TCP and UDP; what they are, how they work, and how one can experiment with tools like Wireshark and Go to learn more.

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