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Kubernetes

Kubernetes is an open source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications.
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Martin Heinz martinheinz.dev

Kubernetes' brand new Checkpointing API lets you backup-and-restore containers without every stopping them

Kubernetes v1.25 introduced Container Checkpointing API as an alpha feature. This provides a way to backup-and-restore containers running in Pods, without ever stopping them.

This feature is primarily aimed at forensic analysis, but general backup-and-restore is something any Kubernetes user can take advantage of.

So, let’s take a look at this brand-new feature and see how we can enable it in our clusters and leverage it for backup-and-restore or forensic analysis.

Kubernetes github.com

A graphical tool for developing on containers and Kubernetes

Podman Desktop installs, configures and keeps Podman up to date on your local environment. It provides a system tray, to check status and interact with your container engine without losing focus from other tasks. The desktop application provides a dashboard to interact with containers, images, pods and volumes but also configures your environment with your OCI registries and network settings. Podman Desktop also provides capabilities to connect and deploy pods to Kubernetes environments.

A graphical tool for developing on containers and Kubernetes

Michael Guarino plural.sh

Kubernetes StatefulSets are broken. Here's why

Why do we think StatefulSets are broken? Well, if you run through the operational needs of a stateful workload in your head, there’s one key component that you might notice is missing:

What do you do when you need to resize the underlying disk?

The dataset is a common database store that typically grows at a pretty constant positive rate. Unless you support horizontal scaling and partitioning, you’ll need to add headroom in the disk as that dataset grows.

This is where Kubernetes falls flat on its face.

Kubernetes plural.sh

How we created an in-browser Kubernetes experience

Michael Guarino lays out how the engineering team at Plural brought K8s to the browser for their users:

Overall, we had a ton of fun building this feature. It allowed us to delve into an often unexplored area of the Kubernetes API, which I am honestly happy that we got to explore. This project also took an unexpected turn in its use of tmux and exposed us to a genuinely mind-blowing project in xtermjs (I’m shocked the community had the patience to write a full shell in javascript!).

How we created an in-browser Kubernetes experience

Kubernetes jeremybrown.tech

Kubernetes is a red flag signalling premature optimisation

Jeremy Brown:

It feels bizarre saying this, having spent so much of my life advocating for and selling a distribution of Kubernetes and consulting services to help folks get the most of out it, but here goes! YOU probably shouldn’t use Kubernetes and a bunch of other “cool” things for your product.

This post turns out to be less about Kubernetes and more about premature optimization and doing more with less. Also it’s about Kubernetes. 😉

Kubernetes enterprisedb.com

CloudNativePG – a new Kubernetes operator for Postgres

CloudNativePG is distributed under the Apache License 2.0, and is now owned and governed by a newly formed community of contributors to the project, built on solid principles and values inspired by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

Among these are openness, fairness, inclusivity, technical excellence, “community over product/company,” built-in quality and built-in security. I’m part of the initial group of maintainers of the project, currently made up by the top six committers of the project within EDB.

If you’ve been following Ship It’s Kaizen episodes, you know we had troubles running Postgres in K8s and recently moved to a managed (sorta) database. I wonder if Gerhard will be tempted to try this operator out anyhow…

Rich Burroughs loft.sh

7 open source cloud native tools that aren’t Kubernetes

Rich Burroughs:

When you hear the phrase “cloud native,” is Kubernetes the first thing that comes to your mind? It is for me, and I expect I’m not alone. Kubernetes is now the second-largest open source project after Linux, and it’s the big fish in the cloud native pond. But there are many other projects in the CNCF landscape and the broader cloud native community.

So, I thought I’d list some cloud native tools that can be very useful for teams that aren’t using Kubernetes or aren’t using it for every workload. Here are 7 of them that I like a lot.

If Rich’s name rings a bell, that’s because he was just on Ship It! last week. 😉

Evil Martians Icon Evil Martians

Stressless Rails deployments on K8s with Kuby

The Evil Martians have been hard at work de-stressifying their Ruby on Rails deployments with a new tool: Kuby. In this post they share their journey getting there. It’s a lot. But in the end they seem happy with the results.

Kuby lowers the bar of adopting Kubernetes for Rails apps, leveraging the power of the convention-over-configuration principle. Just as Rails conquered the world with its “build a blog in 15 minutes” idea, so too could Kuby reign supreme in the context of deployment—”deploy Rails on Kubernetes in 15 minutes”.

Ops nomadproject.io

Nomad vs. Kubernetes

This page is built by the Nomad folks, so keep that in mind when reading through the comparison;

Kubernetes is an orchestration system for containers originally designed by Google, now governed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and developed by Google, Red Hat, and many others. Kubernetes and Nomad support similar core use cases for application deployment and management, but they differ in a few key ways. Kubernetes aims to provide all the features needed to run Linux container-based applications including cluster management, scheduling, service discovery, monitoring, secrets management and more. Nomad only aims to focus on cluster management and scheduling and is designed with the Unix philosophy of having a small scope while composing with tools like Consul for service discovery/service mesh and Vault for secret management.

I’m just excited to see strong competition in this space, and had never heard of Nomad prior to today. If you’ve used it and have experience/opinions, I’d love to hear ’em!

Kubernetes blog.alexellis.io

Do your demos like a boss at KubeCon

Which conference sessions do you remember the most and why? Those with a little theatre, live demos and audience participation are the ones that have stuck with me.

I don’t think that I actually heard the term “live demo” until I went to my first Dockercon event in 2016. The implication was that some demos wouldn’t be run live and would be staged, rehearsed or faked.

We take a quick look at the origins of live conference demos, some of the people who do them best. Then we take a look at why having traffic to localhost may be beneficial to your talk and how you could go about getting real traffic into your local applications.

PostgreSQL kubegres.io

Kubegres is a K8s operator for deploying Postgres clusters

Kubegres is fully integrated with Kubernetes’ lifecycle as it runs as an operator written in Go. It is minimalist in terms of codebase compared to other open-source Postgres operators. It has the minimal and yet robust required features to manage a cluster of PostgreSql on Kubernetes. We aim keeping this project small and simple.

We’ve struggled with running Postgres inside K8s around these parts. Maybe this would’ve helped?

Kubernetes github.com

Datree is a CLI to ensure K8s manifests and Helm charts follow best practices

Datree is a CLI tool that supports Kubernetes admins in their roles, by preventing developers from making errors in Kubernetes configurations that can cause clusters to fail in production. Our CLI tool is open source, enabling it to be supported by the Kubernetes community.

It’s far more effective than manual processes, such as sending an email to a slew of developers, begging them to set various limits, which likely falls on deaf ears because developers are already overwhelmed.

In addition the CIL, Datree provides a web app interface which you can see in action right here.

Amazon Web Services github.com

You can now run Amazon EKS on your own infra

Amazon EKS Anywhere is a new deployment option for Amazon EKS that enables you to easily create and operate Kubernetes clusters on-premises with your own virtual machines. It brings a consistent AWS management experience to your data center, building on the strengths of Amazon EKS Distro, the same distribution of Kubernetes that powers EKS on AWS. Its goal is to include full lifecycle management of multiple Kubernetes clusters that are capable of operating completely independently of any AWS services.

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