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Kubernetes

Kubernetes is an open source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications.
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Kubernetes submariner.io

Connect all your Kubernetes clusters, wherever they are in the world

Submariner is a tool built to connect overlay networks of different Kubernetes clusters. While most testing is performed against Kubernetes clusters that have enabled Flannel/Canal, Submariner should be compatible with any CNI-compatible cluster network provider, as it utilizes off-the-shelf components such as strongSwan/Charon to establish IPsec tunnels between each Kubernetes cluster. Pre-alpha so it’s not ready for production, but it is ready for a follow.

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Abraham Ingersoll gravitational.com

The curious case of serverless on Kubernetes

Abraham Ingersoll: While AWS continues its Mr. Softy strategy of extend, embrace and extinguish with Lambda, Google is doubling down on its Kubernetes masterstroke with the upcoming “Knative.” Using the CNCF’s trail map as a guide, he finds four serious “Serverless on Kubernets” contenders in addition to Knative and overviews them each in turn.

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Kubernetes k3s.io

K3s — Lightweight Kubernetes

K3s is a fully compliant production-grade Kubernetes distribution with the following changes: Legacy, alpha, non-default features are removed. Many of these features are not available in most Kubernetes clusters already. Removed in-tree plugins (cloud providers and storage plugins) which can be replaced with out-of-tree add-ons. Added sqlite3 as the default storage mechanism. etcd3 is still available, but not the default. Wrapped in a simple launcher that handles a lot of the complexity of TLS and options. Rancher is also doing an online meet-up and demo of K3s on March 13, 2019.

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Linux github.com

A Linux distro built specifically for Kubernetes

Talos touts: Security: reduce your attack surface by practicing the Principle of Least Privilege (PoLP) and enforcing mutual TLS (mTLS). Predictability: remove needless variables and reduce unknown factors from your environment using immutable infrastructure. Evolvability: simplify and increase your ability to easily accommodate future changes to your architecture. Hit up the README if you’re curious about the name, why there’s no shell/ssh access, or how it’s different than CoreOS/RancherOS/Linuxkit

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Gianluca gianarb.it

Extend Kubernetes via a shared informer

This post from Gianluca Arbezzano contains both theory and code with a complete working application to understand how to build your own shared informer to extend Kubernetes beyond applying YAML via kubectl. Kubernetes increases in popularity every day but I don’t think we use all its power just applying YAML via kubectl. Kubernetes is a framework and as every framework, it exposes powerful interfaces and API usable to extend its capability with our needs. Shared Informers are what I see as the easy way to enjoy k8s as an extendible tool to programmatically build and ship containers.

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Fernand Galiana Medium

If you K8s, please try K9s...

Operating Kubernetes clusters is becoming more and more taxing in terms of the number of aliases/scripts and single purpose tools one must install/master. K9s is a terminal based CLI to manage and diagnose Kubernetes clusters in a single command. It provides a unified view to navigate and diagnose K8s resources for your local or remote clusters right there in the same CLI.

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Medium Icon Medium

Kubernetes development workflow for macOS (tips and tricks)

Megan O’Keefe, developer relations engineer at Google, shares her setup for Kubernetes as well as some very helpful tips and tricks from her Terminal setup, navigating clusters, and how she gave kubectl superpowers. As a developer relations engineer for Kubernetes, I work a lot with demo code, samples, and sandbox clusters. This can get interesting to keep track of (read: total chaos). So in this post I’ll show some of the tools that make my Kubernetes life a lot better. This environment can work no matter what flavor of Kubernetes you’re running.

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Kubernetes tilt.build

Local Kubernetes development without the stress

Tilt makes it possible to develop all your microservices locally in Kubernetes while collaborating with your team. You define a Tiltfile that describes how your services fit together (which is supposed to be pretty straight forward if you already have a Dockerfile and a Kubernetes config), then share it with your team. Everyone runs tilt up and the app is up and running on their localhost. No more “it worked on my machine” – everything runs in containers so the right dependencies are always there. Tilt updates with container optimization tricks & best practices, so that even complex projects update in seconds.

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Kubernetes github.com

Goldpinger tests and displays connectivity between Kubernetes nodes

Mikolaj Pawlikowski talked about this Bloomberg project at KubeCon 2018 last week. Goldpinger makes calls between its instances for visibility and alerting. It runs as a DaemonSet on Kubernetes and produces Prometheus metrics that can be scraped, visualised and alerted on. Oh, and it gives you the graph below for your cluster. Check out the video explainer.

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Victor Coisne Medium

An analysis of the Kubernetes codebase

In an attempt to confirm Kubernetes’ move beyond hype to widespread enterprise adoption, Francesc Campoy and Victor Coisne used source{d} Engine to analyze all the Kubernetes git repositories through SQL queries. Here’s a snapshot of what they learned. At its outset in 2014, the Kubernetes project had 15 programming languages, a number that quickly increased to 35 by the beginning of 2017. Given that Kubernetes came from Google, it’s not surprising to see that Go is by far the dominant language followed by Python, YAML and Markdown. The analysis shows that other languages such as Gradle and Lua have been dropped while some others like Assembly, SQL and Java made a comeback. The full results of the analysis are available upon request via a link shared at the end of the blog post.

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TechCrunch Icon TechCrunch

VMware acquires Heptio

Heptio is the startup founded by 2 of the co-founders of Kubernetes. We had been working on getting some time planned with the CEO Craig McLucki and CTO Joe Beda, but both were “unavailable” to speak. This acquisition might be one of the reasons why. From Ingrid Lunden’s coverage on TechCrunch: VMware acquires Heptio — a startup out of Seattle that was co-founded by Joe Beda and Craig McLuckie (two of the three people who co-created Kubernetes back at Google in 2014) Beda and McLuckie and their team will all be joining VMware in the transaction. More details can be found on the Heptio blog announcement. As for the terms of the deal, they “are not being disclosed.” For reference, when Heptio last raised money ($25M Series B in 2017) it was valued at $117M post-money. So, I’m estimating this deal to be in the $300M-$500M range. To Craig and Joe — first, congrats. Second, we’re still interested in talking with you. Maybe now is a better time and the details you couldn’t share before can now be more freely shared. This is an open invite, to you both! Congrats also to the team at Heptio for all the hard at work you’re doing to advance Kubernetes and cloud orchestration! What a ride the past few weeks for commercial open source in this recent wave of acquisitions.

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adrienjt admiralty.io

Introducing Multicluster-Controller

Last week, Admiralty open-sourced multicluster-controller, a Go library for building hybrid and multicloud Kubernetes operators. It is the equivalent of operator-sdk or kubebuilder, but for multiple clusters. It is actually a thin layer around parts of controller-runtime, the library that powers kubebuilder. It can be used to control custom resources (defined by CRDs) across clusters.

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Kubernetes kubernetes.io

Kubernetes now has a non-code contributor’s guide

Just in time for #Hacktoberfest! The Non-Code Contributor’s Guide aims to make it easy for anyone to contribute to the Kubernetes project in a way that makes sense for them. This can be in many forms, technical and non-technical, based on the person’s knowledge of the project and their available time. Most individuals are not developers, and most of the world’s developers are not paid to fully work on open source projects. Based on this we have started an ever-growing list of possible ways to contribute to the Kubernetes project in a Non-Code way!

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Daniele Polencic learnk8s.io

What is Kubernetes?

In this highly visual and scroll friendly post from Daniele, you’ll follow the evolution of monolith, to components, to VMs, to today’s world of Kubernetes and cloud. Daniele writes: Kubernetes and Docker? What is the difference? Is it just a fad or are those two technologies here to stay? If you heard about the Docker and Kubernetes, but you aren’t sold on the idea and don’t see the point in migrating, this article is for you. 
Learn how you can leverage Kubernetes to reduce infrastructure costs and accelerate your software delivery.

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Balaji Subramaniam kubernetes.io

Kubernetes' CPU Manager

Feature highlights of the beta CPU Manager in Kubernetes from Balaji Subramaniam, Cloud Software Engineer and Connor Doyle, Cloud Software Architect at Intel AI… A single compute node in a Kubernetes cluster can run many pods and some of these pods could be running CPU-intensive workloads. In such a scenario, the pods might contend for the CPU resources available in that compute node. When this contention intensifies, the workload can move to different CPUs depending on whether the pod is throttled and the availability of CPUs at scheduling time. There might also be cases where the workload could be sensitive to context switches. In all the above scenarios, the performance of the workload might be affected. If your workload is sensitive to such scenarios, then CPU Manager can be enabled to provide better performance isolation by allocating exclusive CPUs for your workload.

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Paul Dix InfluxData Blog

Will Kubernetes collapse under the weight of its complexity?

Paul Dix, Founder and CTO of InfluxData, writes on the InfluxData blog: I attended and spoke at KubeCon EU. It was a massive event attended by around 4,700 people … However, I felt there was an underlying problem … everyone I spoke with was either an operator or an SRE. Where were all the application developers? Aren’t those the people that all this complex infrastructure is supposed to serve? Which raised questions for Paul, like… Is Kubernetes too complex? Will it end up collapsing under the weight of its own complexity? Will it fade away as OpenStack has seemed to since 2014? And Paul walked away from KubeCon EU with this perspective: Application developers would be better served by having a happy path to follow with the tools preselected … CNCF’s increasing complexity and broader reach might dilute the focus and brand of Kubernetes … I’m not sure what the answer might be to this or if I’m overblowing it, but from my perspective at the conference, it was like tool porn. Why bother with solving user problems when you can spend your entire career learning about and building new tools for infrastructure?

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Netflix Technology Blog Icon Netflix Technology Blog

Titus, the Netflix container management platform, is now open source

Is Netflix Titus open source yet? Yes. Titus powers critical aspects of the Netflix business, from video streaming, recommendations and machine learning, big data, content encoding, studio technology, internal engineering tools, and other Netflix workloads So, why is Netflix open sourcing Titus? …we’ve been asked over and over again, “When will you open source Titus?” It was clear that we were discussing ideas, problems, and solutions that resonated with those at a variety of companies, both large and small. We hope that by sharing Titus we are able to help accelerate like-minded teams, and to bring the lessons we’ve learned forward in the container management community. The question is, is it too late for Titus to gain traction in a world where Kubernetes has seemingly already won?

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Kubernetes github.com

A best practice guide to Kubernetes security

K8s is a powerful platform which can be abused in many ways if not configured properly. Contributors to this guide are running Kubernetes in production and worked on several K8s projects to learn about security flaws the hard way. This guide scores major points for having battle-hardened contributors. I also dig how they indicate the severity/importance of each topic with an emoji. Look out for the 💥s!

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