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Tooling and apps used to create and deliver awesome software.
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Michael Uloth upandrunningtutorials.com

How to set up a Mac for web development

From installing Mac’s command line developer tools (Xcode), Homebrew, Git, npm, to your code editor — Michael Uloth walks you through all the steps and details to get a new Mac ready for web development. This guide is a good start and purposely leaves out items that aren’t strictly required for web development. If you’re into automation and tweaking things, then thoughtbot/laptop is another route to consider. It automates most of Michael’s steps and can also be customized to install only exactly what you want.

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Medium Icon Medium

Kubernetes development workflow for macOS (tips and tricks)

Megan O’Keefe, developer relations engineer at Google, shares her setup for Kubernetes as well as some very helpful tips and tricks from her Terminal setup, navigating clusters, and how she gave kubectl superpowers. As a developer relations engineer for Kubernetes, I work a lot with demo code, samples, and sandbox clusters. This can get interesting to keep track of (read: total chaos). So in this post I’ll show some of the tools that make my Kubernetes life a lot better. This environment can work no matter what flavor of Kubernetes you’re running.

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Floor DrEES Phusion Blog

Using GitHub Actions to build and publish a Ruby gem

Follow along as our friends at Phusion walk us through the process of creating a GitHub Actions workflow to build and publish a Ruby gem to the RubyGems registry. One of the actions featured in the version that’s currently exclusively available to GitHub employees and a selected and undisclosed group of Beta testers, is the ‘GitHub Action for npm’, which wraps the npm CLI to enable common npm commands. We set out to instead make an example workflow to build and publish a Ruby library (or: gem) to the default public registry, and created a GitHub repository, with a Docker container for a ‘Rubygems’ action: github.com/scarhand/actions-ruby

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Electron github.com

Notable – The markdown-based note taking app 'that doesn't suck'

The thing about taking notes apps is everyone likes ‘em a bit different. Here’s what the author of Notable was after: Notes are written and rendered in GitHub-flavored Markdown, no WYSIWYG, no proprietary formats, I can run a search & replace across all notes, notes support attachments, the app isn’t bloated, the app has a pretty interface, tags are indefinitely nestable and can import Evernote notes (because that’s what I was using before). If that resonates with you, click through. 😄

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The Changelog The Changelog #330

source{d} turns code into actionable insights

Adam caught up with Francesc Campoy at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2018 in Seattle, WA to talk about the work he’s doing at Source{d} to apply Machine Learning to source code, and turn that codebase into actionable insights. It’s a movement they’re driving called Machine Learning on Code. They talked through their open source products, how they work, what types of insights can be gained, and they also talked through the code analysis Francesc did on the Kubernetes code base. This is as close as you get to the bleeding edge and we’re very interested to see where this goes.

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Johan Brandhorst grpc.io

The state of gRPC in the browser

Front-enders should check this out! Johan Brandhorst reviews the history of gRPC in the browser, the state of things today, and thoughts on the future of gRPC-Web. gRPC-Web is an excellent choice for web developers. It brings the portability, performance, and engineering of a sophisticated protocol into the browser, and marks an exciting time for frontend developers! So far the benefits have largely only been available to mobile app and backend developers, whilst frontend developers have had to continue to rely on JSON REST interfaces as their primary means of information exchange. However, with the release of gRPC-Web, gRPC is poised to become a valuable addition in the toolbox of frontend developers.

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Aaron Turner Medium

WebAssembly vs. ES6 — benchmark battle!

Aaron Turner (UXE at Google) says “WebAssembly is fast” and has conducted a real-world benchmark between WebAssembly and ES6 to showcase Wasm’s performance on different browsers, devices, and cores. …this benchmark will be utilizing the WasmBoy benchmarking tool (source code). The benchmark features three different cores as of today. AssemblyScript (WebAssembly built with the AssemblyScript compiler), JavaScript (ESNext output by the TypeScript compiler), and the previous JavaScript core except run through Google’s Closure Compiler…

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Victor Coisne Medium

An analysis of the Kubernetes codebase

In an attempt to confirm Kubernetes’ move beyond hype to widespread enterprise adoption, Francesc Campoy and Victor Coisne used source{d} Engine to analyze all the Kubernetes git repositories through SQL queries. Here’s a snapshot of what they learned. At its outset in 2014, the Kubernetes project had 15 programming languages, a number that quickly increased to 35 by the beginning of 2017. Given that Kubernetes came from Google, it’s not surprising to see that Go is by far the dominant language followed by Python, YAML and Markdown. The analysis shows that other languages such as Gradle and Lua have been dropped while some others like Assembly, SQL and Java made a comeback. The full results of the analysis are available upon request via a link shared at the end of the blog post.

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Data visualization learnui.design

A color palette generator for the design 'impaired'

This “Data Color Picker” looks like a spectacular tool for any developer out there (like myself) who appreciates the value of a good color palette, but lacks the ability to put one together. You’re not alone! (This tool is for generating equidistant palettes for data visualizations, but it can most certainly be used generically.) Creating visually equidistant palettes is basically impossible to do by hand, yet hugely important for data visualizations. Why? When colors are not visually equidistant, it’s harder to (a) tell them apart in the chart, and (b) compare the chart to the key. I’m sure we’ve all looked at charts where you can hardly use the key since the data colors are so similar. You pick the “endpoint” colors and it generates all of the colors in-between. Very cool.

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Practices simplabs.com

How simplabs maintains a large number of open source projects

In this blog post we will introduce you to some of out internal best practices we have developed or discovered to simplify and speed up working on open-source and other projects. There’s nothing revolutionary in here for those experienced in open source maintenance, but it’s a good rundown nonetheless. It’s also interesting to see how many teams are now using (and recommending) dependency update services such as dependabot and Greenkeeper.

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Daniel Stenberg daniel.haxx.se

Daniel Stenberg is leaving Mozilla

We’ve been chronicling Daniel’s work on #curl for some time now. December 11, 2018 will be Daniel’s final official day at Mozilla. He assures us that his work on curl will continue, saying this in regards to his time dedicated to curl and where he works for his full-time income, “I don’t think my choice of future employer should have to affect that negatively too much, except of course in periods.” Here are the main points from Daniel (but you should certainly dig into the details): It’s been five great years, but now it is time for me to move on and try something else. …lots of the HTTP/2 development and the publication of that was made while I was employed by Mozilla and I fondly participated in that. …we’re also losing Mozilla as a primary sponsor of the curl project, since that was made up of them allowing me to spend some of my work days on curl and that’s now over. I will continue to follow and work with HTTP and other internet protocols very closely. The future is bright but unknown! “I don’t yet know what to do next.”

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James Governor redmonk.com

"GitHub is where source code lives."

I agree — “GitHub is, quite simply, home for developers,” as stated by James Governor in his highlights post on GitHub Universe 2018. Out the gate, James focuses on the announcement of GitHub Actions, which “feels like a profound launch, one that could prove extremely disruptive in the long term.” An idea that seems to have started as “Probot” is now a full fledged and more approachable product offering called GitHub Actions, and looks like it will continue to drive more and developers, developers, developers to GitHub in 2019. Quite simply, Actions could be a disruption driving feature. So what about future implications of Actions for AWS, Microsoft Azure and GCP Cloud compute platforms? Actions could even pose a threat to the centrality and stickiness of the cloud console, because If developers can drive all their workflows from GitHub they have less need to use the console. It might seem absurd to position GitHub as an AWS competitor … but there is no denying the potential for GitHub to lessen the primacy of a cloud operator console in favor of Actions scripted in GitHub, triggering actions and deployments across multiple clouds. GitHub used its keynote to demonstrate the ability to deploy a workload across multiple clouds. Mark your calendars for November 28th! We’re releasing a new episode on The Changelog talking GitHub Actions with Kyle Daigle, Director of Ecosystem Engineering at GitHub, and one of the leaders to bring Actions to fruition. Stay tuned!

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Facebook Engineering Blog Icon Facebook Engineering Blog

Facebook has a tool that learns to fix bugs automatically?!

This week on the Facebook code blog they shared details about a new tool called Getafix that automatically finds fixes for bugs and offers them to engineers to approve. 😎 Modern production codebases are extremely complex and are updated constantly. To create a system that can automatically find fixes for bugs — without help from engineers — we built Getafix to learn from engineers’ previous changes to the codebase. It finds hidden patterns and uses them to identify the most likely remediations for new bugs. Getafix has been deployed to production at Facebook, where it now contributes to the stability of apps that billions of people use. The goal of Getafix is to let computers take care of the routine work, albeit under the watchful eye of a human, who must decide when a bug requires a complex, nonroutine remediation. Whether or not this tool will be open sourced or shared at large remains to be seen. How cool would it be to have something like this deployed to your codebase to find and suggest fixes to your bugs?

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Adam Stacoviak changelog.com/posts

Install Node.js and npm using Homebrew on OS X and macOS

If you’re looking for an easy guide to install Node.js and npm on OS X and macOS — this is it. The default method for installing Node.js is to download a pre-built installer for your platform, install it and make sure it’s on your $PATH. However — if you’re a Homebrew fan like me and prefer to install all of your packages with it — ensuring your packages are installed using the same commands and directories and allowing Homebrew to easily manage upgrades and updates, then this guide will help you get started. Install Node.js and npm with Homebrew First, install Homebrew. /usr/bin/ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)" Then run brew update to make sure Homebrew is up to date. brew update As a safe measure you should run brew doctor to make sure your system is ready to brew. Run the command below and follow any recommendations from brew doctor. brew doctor Next, add Homebrew’s location to your $PATH in your .bash_profile or .zshrc file. export PATH="/usr/local/bin:$PATH" Next, install Node (npm will be installed with Node): brew install node To test out your Node and npm install, try installing Grunt (you might be asked to run with sudo): npm install -g grunt-cli If that worked then congratulations — you’ve installed Node.js, npm, and Grunt. If not — retrace your steps or post a question to Stack Overflow. Listen to Related Podcasts on The Changelog Since you’re interested in Node.js, npm, and Homebrew — listen to some recent related podcasts we’ve done on those subjects. #223: Homebrew and Package Management with Mike McQuaid #200: JavaScript and Robots with Raquel Vélez, a.k.a. rockbot #178: OAuth 2.0, Oz, Node.js, and Hapi.js with Eran Hammer #155: The Future of Node.js with Scott Hammond #139: The Rise of io.js with Mikeal Rogers #119: MEAN.js & Full-Stack JavaScript with Roie Cohen and Amos Haviv #116: Node Black Friday at Walmart with Eran Hammer #113: Keep npm Running with Isaac Schlueter and Charlie Robbins #101: npm Origins and Node.js with Isaac Schlueter

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