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JavaScript

JavaScript is an object-oriented programming language used alongside HTML and CSS to give functionality to web pages.
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Isaac Schlueter blog.npmjs.org

npm has a new CEO

npm has faced some interesting challenges with project creator and co-founder Isaac Schlueter playing the role of leading the company AND the product. I’m excited to see how this new leadership and focus for Isaac plays out for npm and the greater JavaScript community. In this post, Isaac shares some backstory and details about this transition: Today, I’m happy to introduce Bryan Bogensberger as npm, Inc.’s CEO. He brings a wealth of experience in Open Source and a ton of excitement and expertise to help grow npm to the next level and beyond. Commercializing something like this without ruining it is no small task, and building the team to deliver on npm’s promise is a major undertaking. We’ve sketched out a business plan and strategy for the next year, and will be announcing some other key additions to the team in the coming months. Meanwhile, I’ve taken on the title of Chief Product Officer and I will be spending my time focused on the part of the problem that I love.

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Dan Abramov Increment

The melting pot of JavaScript

Dan Abramov, writing for Increment: Unconstrained by a single vendor, the JavaScript ecosystem closely reflects human culture. It is inventive, incremental, messy, assimilating everything on its way, and ubiquitous. I’ll be honest: I love the melting pot of JavaScript. And while there’s no denying that it’s harder for beginners now to get into it than it was for me five years ago, I believe there are a few things we can do to make it more approachable. But first, let’s see how the JavaScript ecosystem came to be this way. Whether are weighed down by JavaScript fatigue or revved up about the JavaScript renaissance, you’ll probably enjoy this insightful piece all about the melting pot that we call JS.

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Webpack github.com

🚀 Jetpack wraps webpack to create a smoother developer experience

Jetpack can be used instead of webpack, webpack-cli, webpack-dev-server and webpack-dev-middleware without writing any configuration. Jetpack is a thin wrapper around webpack, and can be extended with any of the webpack configuration. Taking the configuration out of webpack seems like a recipe for success. This project is an exploration of some ideas accumulated over a few years using webpack in a variety of projects. Webpack is a very powerful and flexible tool. It applies to a lot of use cases and that is one of the reasons it has so many configuration options. Webpack also evolved over the years but preserved backwards compatibility as much as possible to support the large ecosystem built around it. I’d be surprised if some of the good ideas in Jetpack don’t find their way in to webpack proper.

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Omar Bahareth Medium

Lessons learned from a year of fighting with Webpack and Babel

Webpack and Babel are awesome, this article isn’t trying to say otherwise. We wouldn’t be able to use a lot of things if it weren’t for them, but the experience of using them together needs to get better. I faced many of these issues over the course of many months and understanding them/finding solutions was incredibly difficult (error messages don’t exactly tell you what went wrong and searching for them doesn’t always give relevant results), and I hope this article can act as the guide I had hoped to find back then. I love posts these where you take your hard-won learnings and share them with the world in an attempt to save others from the same headaches.

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Divya Sasidharan shortdiv.com

All eyes on Wasm

We’re tracking the activity around Wasm quite well, but we’re open to more suggestions if you have them. In this post Divya shares some insights and the big idea behind Wasm. It is undeniable at this point that WebAssembly is (and will be) a huge game changer for web development. As a lower level language, it efficiently handles more computationally heavy tasks and allows us to so more, with less. Though we’re still in the early stages of WASM, the future looks bright.

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JavaScript chriscavs.github.io

Rallax.js – dead simple parallax scrolling

Vanilla JS. No dependencies. Even handles tricky situations like when conditions: const parallax = rallax('.parallax') // after reaching a certain position in the document, // increase the target's speed parallax.when( () => window.scrollY > 400, () => parallax.changeSpeed(1) ) // stop the parallax after a certain period of time const startTime = new Date().getTime() parallax.when( () => { const newTime = new Date().getTime() return newTime - startTime > 4000 }, () => parallax.stop() )

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Eran Hammer Medium

Why you should consider hapi

Eran Hammer makes the case for hapi as your Node web framework of choice. We’ve been talking about dependencies a lot lately due to recent events. In light of that, think about this: hapi was the first (and still the only) framework without any external code dependencies… I personally (and manually) review every single line of code that goes into hapi (excluding node itself). I review every pull request on every dependency regardless if I am the lead maintainer. That’s quite the selling point! He has a lot of great reasons why hapi is worthy of your consideration. Click through for the hard pitch.

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JavaScript github.com

A lightweight, auto-curried functional programming library

arare enables you to write tacit, point-free, declarative & clean code while avoiding side-effects and mutations. Internally the library itself, comprised of over 200 functions, follows the functional programming paradigm and is materialized using fundamental functional qualities such as currying, recursion, tail calls, high-order functions, referential transparency, side-effects elimination and function composition. Ships with a built-in REPL. 💪

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Medium Icon Medium

Crowdsourcing the evolution of text parsing with unified

unified –for the uninitiated– is an interface for processing text with syntax trees and transforming between them. Maybe you’ve never heard of it, but you’ve probably relied on it as part of your software infrastructure: [unified] has been OSS for years, but has recently gotten more traction. It’s used in fancy technology such as MDX, Gatsby, and Prettier, and used to build things like Node’s docs, freeCodeCamp, and GitHub’s open source guide. Project’s like unified are crucial to the JavaScript ecosystem, but they’re difficult to fund and support toward sustainability. Hence, the unified collective. Today, we are pleased to announce the creation of the unified collective. It’s an effort to bring together like-minded organisations to collaboratively work on the innovation of content through seamless, interchangeable, and extendible tooling. We build parsers, transformers, and utilities so that others don’t have to worry about syntax. We make it easier for developers to develop. Let’s show these maintainers some 💚 and share this around to those who should be supporting it.

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The Changelog The Changelog #326

The insider perspective on the event-stream compromise

Adam and Jerod talk with Dominic Tarr, creator of event-stream, the IO library that made recent news as the latest malicious package in the npm registry. event-stream was turned malware, designed to target a very specific development environment and harvest account details and private keys from Bitcoin accounts. They talk through Dominic’s backstory as a prolific contributor to open source, his stance on this package, his work in open source, the sequence of events around the hack, how we can and should handle maintainer-ship of open source infrastructure over the full life-cycle of the code’s usefulness, and what some best practices are for moving forward from this kind of attack.

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JS Party JS Party #53

VisBug is like DevTools for designers

Google UX Engineer Adam Argyle joins Jerod and KBall to share all the details on VisBug, his just-released Chrome Extension that “makes any webpage feel like an artboard.” Adam is passionate about doing for designers what Firebug (and later DevTools) did for developers. In this episode, he shares that passion and how it’s driven him to create and open source VisBug.

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