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Tim github.com

Transform Gist into your personal key/value data store

Sometimes all a project needs is the ability to read/write small amounts of JSON data and have it saved in some persistent storage. Imagine a simple data-model which receives infrequent updates and could be represented as JSON object. It doesn’t demand a full-blown database, but it would be neat to have a way to interact with this data and have it persist across sessions.

This is where gist-database comes in handy, by leveraging the power of the gist api you can easily create a key/value data-store for your project.

This is a perfect solution for low write / high read scenarios when serving static site content with Next.js and using Incremental Static Regeneration to keep your cached content fresh.

Stefan Judis stefanjudis.com

Split JS strings into sentences, words or graphemes with `Intl.Segmenter`

If you’ve ever had to split a string into sentences, you may have reached for a naive regular expression:

'Hello! How are you?'.split(/[.!?]/);

Instead of giving yourself two problems, Stefan Judis says maybe reach for Intl.Segmenter, which he shows is quite sophisticated and supported everywhere but Firefox.

Testing new.pythonforengineers.com

Web automation: don't use Selenium, use Playwright

For web automation/testing, Selenium has been the de facto “standard” since forever. It’s simple to get started with and supports almost every programming language.
My problem with it has been: It’s good enough, but nothing more. It doesn’t work that well with modern, Javascript framework heavy sites (Angular, React etc). I’m not saying it doesn’t work– just not too well.

I know a lot of people who use Selenium, but I don’t know a lot of people who enjoy using Selenium. (That’s no knock on the Selenium team. They solved a hard problem for lots of devs over the course of many years. Huge impact!) Playwright on the other hand…

Bill Prin billprin.com

Why I ditched Django for NextJS

If you’re feeling the FOMO of JavaScript or you’re writing “spaghetti code” just to do something a NextJS component would do out of the box, then read this post from Bill Prin on why he moved from Django to NextJS.

The summary is that using a language like Python or Ruby for a significant web project has increasingly gotten less reasonable over time to the point where now, in 2022, it’s getting hard to justify. By not keeping your web stack in pure Javascript, you are making your life unnecessarily difficult (as usual, we’ll include languages like TypeScript as part of the JavaScript ecosystem). You will almost certainly invest a bunch of time-solving problems that would be automatically solved for you if you just stuck with JavaScript.

I will provide specific examples of solving problems using Django that would have been trivially solved in NextJS.

He goes on to share two reasons why you should use Python or Ruby for web projects in 2022.

You’re working on an existing project that hasn’t been migrated yet or is not worth migrating.
You are already a master of a Python or Ruby web stack, and you need to implement a new project as soon as possible, and you don’t have time to learn a better stack.

Tobias Koppers Vercel

Introducing Turbopack: Rust-based successor to Webpack

Webpack creator Tobias Koppers announcing its (Vercel-funded) successor:

Turbopack is built on a new incremental architecture for the fastest possible development experience. On large applications, it shows updates 10x faster than Vite and 700x faster than Webpack. On even larger applications, the difference is greater—often 20x faster than Vite.

Turbopack is open source and still in alpha. Here’s what the future may hold:

To start, Turbopack will be used for the Next.js 13 development server. It will power lightning-fast HMR, and it will support React Server Components natively, as well as TypeScript, JSX, CSS, and more.

Turbopack will eventually also power Next.js production builds, both locally and in the cloud. We’ll be able to share Turbo’s cache across your entire team, using Vercel Remote Caching.

Webpack users can also expect an incremental migration path into the Rust-based future with Turbopack.

Changelog Interviews Changelog Interviews #509

A new batch of web frameworks emerge!

This week we’re talking fresh, faster, and new web frameworks by way of JS Party. Yes, today’s show is a web framework sampler because a new batch of web frameworks have emerged. There’s always something new happening in the front-end world and JS Party does an amazing job of keeping us up to date. So…what’s fresh, faster, and new?

The first segment of the show focuses on Deno’s Fresh new web framework. Luca Casonato joins Jerod & Feross to talk about Fresh – a next generation web framework, built for speed, reliability, and simplicity.

In segment two, AngularJS creator Miško Hevery joins Jerod and KBall to talk about Qwik. He says Qwik is a fundamental rethinking of how a web application should work. And he’s attempting to convince Jerod & KBall that the implications of that are BIG.

In the last segment, Amal talks with Fred Schott about Astro 1.0. They go deep on how Astro is built to pull content from anywhere and serve it fast with their next-gen island architecture.

Plus there’s an 8 minute bonus for our ++ subscribers (changelog.com/++). Fred Schott explains Astro Islands and how Astro extracts your UI into smaller, isolated components on the page, and the unused JavaScript gets replaced with lightweight HTML — leading to faster loads and time-to-interactive.

Tobias Bieniek mainmatter.com

node_modules: How one character saved 50 GB of disk space

Tobias Bieniek:

Have you ever worked with JavaScript? Have you been annoyed by the three hundred copies of left-pad in all of the node_modules folders on your disk? Would you prefer if all of your projects shared their node_modules folders instead of each getting their own copy?

The single character that saved him all that space? The p in pnpm

JS Party JS Party #245

Launching Platformatic DB 🚀

Patformatic co-founders Matteo Collina & Luca Maraschi join Amal & Chris to discuss their just-announced (and we mean just announced) open source database tool: Platformatic DB!

It’s a daemon that can turn any PostgreSQL, MySQL, MariaDB, or SQLite database into a REST and GraphQL endpoint. What makes it special is that it allows massive customization thanks to the flexibility of Fastify plugins.

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