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Frameworks

A framework is a reusable set of libraries or classes in software.
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Tobias Uhlig github.com

A UI framework that runs (almost) entirely in Web Workers

Tobias Uhlig:

Neo is based on top of ES8 and uses the latest ES features as long as they can run directly inside the browser. This is one of the major design goals: the dev mode can run inside a browser without needing any JS related builds or transpilations. Instead of using any kind of templates, persistent JSON structures are in place. The combinations of these concepts lead to a pretty amazing performance and adds new possibilities for scaling to the UI area.

I haven’t seen any benchmarks or examples where using Neo produces extreme performance, but conceptually it makes sense that moving computationally expensive things to background threads would keep your UI thread snappy.

JavaScript timkadlec.com

The cost of JavaScript frameworks

We all know our users pay a cost when we push our JS framework in to their browser. Now, thanks to Tim Kadlec doing the yeoman’s work of crunching the numbers, we can approximate just how much that cost really is.

There is no faster (pun intended) way to slow down a site than to use a bunch of JavaScript. The thing about JavaScript is you end up paying a performance tax no less than four times:

  1. The cost of downloading the file on the network
  2. The cost of parsing and compiling the uncompressed file once downloaded
  3. The cost of executing the JavaScript
  4. The memory cost

Thanks to HTTP Archive, we can figure that out.

I’m pretty happy with how sites using jQuery size up. Granted, it’s not really a UI framework like the others are, but you have to imagine that many of those sites also use jQuery UI and their overall cost still compares well to the more modern solutions.

Brandon Bayer github.com

Blitz.js — a Rails-like framework for full-stack React apps without an API

Brandon Bayer:

The central thesis is that most apps don’t need a REST or GraphQL API. Blitz brings back the simplicity of server rendered frameworks like Ruby on Rails while preserving everything we love about React.

Additionally, Blitz is bringing other Rails goodness that’s missing in the React ecosystem like file structure and routing conventions, a really nice console REPL, intelligent code-scaffolding, and a fine-tuned out-of-the-box setup with Prettier, Typescript, ESlint, Jest, Cypress, etc.

The framework ‘wars’ continue right alongside the monolith-vs-microservices debate. For more on the principles behind Blitz, check out the manifesto.

Go github.com

Fiber – an Express inspired web framework for gophers

I know the Go community isn’t one for frameworks, but as a long time framework user myself, I’ve never quite understood the resistance. Fiber doesn’t hide the ball. It comes right out and says “this is a web framework written in Go”. Here’s the philosophy behind that:

New gophers that make the switch from Node.js to Go are dealing with a learning curve before they can start building their web applications or microservices. Fiber, as a web framework, was created with the idea of minimalism and follow UNIX way, so that new gophers can quickly enter the world of Go with a warm and trusted welcome.

Fiber is inspired by Express, the most popular web framework on the Internet. We combined the ease of Express and raw performance of Go. If you have ever implemented a web application on Node.js (using Express or similar), then many methods and principles will seem very common to you.

Medium Icon Medium

I’ve spent 5 years writing a JavaScript framework on my own

Typescene is a robust front end library written in TypeScript: strongly typed, no dependencies, no nonsense. It’s really great for desktop-like (or mobile) applications, not so great for blogs and other content. It isn’t backed by some major corporation, not even a startup, but it’s been built by me: one developer on a mission to build a no-nonsense dependency-less framework

The author’s journey is noteworthy, but if you’re mostly wanting to know if this particular framework speaks to you, jump directly to its list of goals.

Google Icon Google

Flutter for web

Flutter for web is a code-compatible implementation of Flutter that is rendered using standards-based web technologies: HTML, CSS and JavaScript. With Flutter for web, you can compile existing Flutter code written in Dart into a client experience that can be embedded in the browser and deployed to any web server. You can use all the features of Flutter, and you don’t need a browser plug-in.

This means Flutter is now on mobile, web, desktop, and embedded systems. What surprises me is how dedicated to Dart Google seems to be, despite community malaise and the success of TypeScript.

Rich Harris svelte.dev

Svelte 3: rethinking reactivity

After several months of being just days away, we are over the moon to announce the stable release of Svelte 3. This is a huge release representing hundreds of hours of work by many people in the Svelte community, including invaluable feedback from beta testers who have helped shape the design every step of the way.

Lots of folks (myself included) have been eagerly awaiting this release after Rich teed it up on The Changelog #332. We’d love to hear your first impressions!

Chi Wang deskgap.com

Deskgap — build cross-platform desktop apps with web technologies

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before…the difference is DeskGap leverages the operating system‘s webview instead of baking a browser in with it (like Electron).

DeskGap is a framework for building cross-platform desktop apps with web technologies (JavaScript, HTML and CSS).

To enable native capabilities while keeping the size down, DeskGap bundles a Node.js runtime and leaves the HTML rendering to the operating system‘s webview.

HTML github.com

A community fork of the popular Semantic UI framework

I’ve been using Semantic UI for years. Still do to this day. Unfortunately, the project hasn’t been sustainable with a BDFL despite Jack Lukic’s efforts (you can read a lot more on that history right here).

These things happen. And when they do, it’s awesome to see the community rally around the project and keep it alive and thriving. That’s exactly the case with Fomantic UI. Let’s be clear: this is no hostile takeover. From the README:

NOTE: Fomantic was created to continue active development of Semantic-UI and has the intent to be merged back into the master repository once active development can restart.

Let’s hope the two can become one flesh at some point in the future. In the meantime, Fomantic is where the action’s at.

sorrycc umijs.org

UmiJS – a pluggable, enterprise-level React app framework

Umi is based on routing, supports next.js-like conventional routing, and various advanced routing functions, such as routing-level on-demand loading. Then with a complete plugin system, covering every life cycle from source code to build product, umi is able to support various functional extensions and business needs, currently umi have almost 50+ plugins in both community and inside company.

Bash github.com

A standard library and boilerplate framework for writing tools using Bash

The aim of Bash Infinity is to maximize readability of bash scripts, minimize the amount of code repeat and create a central repository for a well-written, and a well-tested standard library for bash.

It seems to me that by the time you need something as fancy/full-featured as this, maybe the task at hand has outgrown Bash? Cool, nonetheless. 👍

Kevin Ball zendev.com

GitHub stars !== usage: React is still blowing Vue and Angular away

KBall, on Vue’s ⭐️ count surpassing React’s:

Don’t get me wrong, I love Vue - I’ve been using it far more than React recently - but github stars are more of a measure of the “hipness” of a project than its actual use.

He backs that up by citing the preposterously low number of stars ‘earned’ by the Apache web server, which powers ~38% of websites. What is a useful metric, then?

There is no perfect measure - there are many many ways to install and use any of these projects - but NPM has become the de facto standard for installing JavaScript packages. If we look at download statistics for the core package of each of these frameworks - the vue package and the react package, that should give us a reasonable proxy for actual use.

Click through for his detailed findings, but the big takeaway is right there 👆 in the headline.

Kyle Mathews gatsbyjs.org

GatsbyJS raised a $3.8M seed round and is now a startup

Well, Gatsby is officially a startup! They just announced the formation of Gatsby Inc. and have raised a $3.8M seed round to fund the effort. Wow, congrats Kyle and team.

Kyle Matthews writes on the Gatsby blog:

I’m thrilled to announce the formation of Gatsby Inc. Based on the open source project Gatsby I founded, Gatsby the company will make feature-rich and blazing-fast websites easier to build and run.

What is Gatsby?

Gatsby is…

  • a blazing fast static site generator for React.js
  • a powerful and flexible modern website framework that simplifies every step of starting, developing and running websites
  • helps you leverage open source innovations in the React, NPM, and Gatsby communities for your web projects
  • lets you pull data into pages from WordPress, Drupal, Contentful, markdown—and any other data source you can imagine
  • compiles and optimizes your site’s code to make your sites lightning fast—even on mobile

Mauricio Gomes github.com

Stealth – a Ruby framework for creating conversational bots

This is a lot like Ruby on Rails (even with ActiveSupport & ActiveRecord built-in), but instead of views you have replies. It works for both voice-based and text-based bots and has NLP offerings baked in too. 🍰

The only bummer is that service integrations are currently limited to Facebook Messenger and Twilio SMS. That’s pretty normal for a new open source offering, though, and it’s a great place to hop in and contribute.

React github.com

Create native desktop applications through a React syntax, on all platforms

Proton Native looks full of potential:

  1. Same syntax as React Native
  2. Works with existing React libraries such as Redux
  3. Cross platform
  4. Native components. No more Electron
  5. Compatible with all normal Node.js packages

This is the 2nd (1st here) Electron-less desktop UI framework I’ve logged in the past week. Are we seeing a rising trend or merely coincidence?

project Icon github.com

"The mother of all demo apps"

I think we’ve linked to this before, but it’s worth sharing again as people have continued to add implementations. The conceit:

While most “todo” demos provide an excellent cursory glance at a framework’s capabilities, they typically don’t convey the knowledge & perspective required to actually build real applications with it.

RealWorld solves this by allowing you to choose any frontend (React, Angular 2, & more) and any backend (Node, Django, & more) and see how they power a real world, beautifully designed fullstack app called “Conduit”.

It’s so cool that you can plug and play different front ends (13 so far) and back ends (32!) and the app will continue to work because they all conform to the same API.

Ryan Bigg ryanbigg.com

Thoughts on Hanami

Ryan Bigg has been toying around with Hanami (an alternative Ruby web framework). In this post, he shares the top three things he likes about Hanami and contrasts them to Rails. To sum it up:

There’s a few places where your mind has to change into the “Hanami Way”, but ultimately once your mind does that you’ll realise that the Hanami way is better.

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