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JavaScript is an object-oriented programming language used alongside HTML and CSS to give functionality to web pages.
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Svelte github.com

A Svelte compiler & watcher that works with Snowpack

The goal of svelvet is to make svelte play nicely with snowpack and web_modules. As of today, svelte depends on a loader for webpack or rollup which compiles your svelte components into individual js files. Since snowpack’s goal is to avoid the need for a bundler, we can’t use those loaders, but we can use svelte’s internal compiler api to do 95% of the work for us. On top of that, svelvet adds automatic file watching to recompile your svelte files just like a loader would, but much faster! I’m not gonna lie, any green field that offers a super light build process is looking pretty stinkin’ green these days. That being said, there’s a reason we call it the bleeding edge.

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JavaScript github.com

A Next.js site demonstrating SSG support with a Notion-backed blog

I’m not sure which is more interesting: the fact that Next.js is getting in to the static-site generation game or the fact that Notion is becoming popular enough amongst devs that people would use it as a back-end for their blog. The Notion aspect, while interesting, comes with a big disclaimer: since it is using a private API and experimental features, use at your own risk as these things could change at any moment.

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JavaScript snowpack.dev

With Snowpack you can build modern web apps without a bundler

No more waiting for your bundler to rebuild your site every time you hit save. Instead, every change is reflected in the browser instantly. This relies on ESM (Mikeal gave a great rundown on the current state of things on a recent JS Party), so it’s not for everyone. The homepage has rundowns on who should use this, who should avoid it, and how to get started. Brought to you by the fine folks at Pika.

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Yehuda Katz blog.emberjs.com

Ember Octane is here

Ember has always focused on building the best framework that people with different levels of skill can use together to build web applications. Octane updates Ember’s components and reactivity system to make them more modern, easier to use, and just more fun. Glimmer;‘s Components and Reactivity are the two big changes in this major release from the Ember team. Both are opt-in and fully interoperable with existing code. Read Yehuda’s full announcement for all the details.

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JavaScript github.com

7 simple functions to give you a feel for how machines can actually "learn"

NanoNeuron is an over-simplified version of the Neuron concept from Neural Networks. NanoNeuron is trained to convert temperature values from Celsius to Fahrenheit. The NanoNeuron.js code example contains 7 simple JavaScript functions (which touches on model prediction, cost calculation, forward/backwards propagation, and training) that will give you a feeling of how machines can actually “learn”. No 3rd-party libraries, no external data-sets or dependencies, only pure and simple JavaScript functions. This is not a complete guide to machine learning. Just a primer.

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Manuel Vila freeCodeCamp

How to simplify full-stack development with a unified architecture

Manuel Vila, writing for freeCodeCamp: In this article, I introduce the concept of “unified architecture” that dramatically simplifies the development of full-stack applications. Indeed, this architecture unifies the six physical layers (data access, backend model, API server, API client, frontend model, and user interface) usually seen in “well-designed” applications into one single logical layer. It is like going from a 3D world to a 2D world. Everything gets a lot easier. That “unified architecture” manifests itself as Liaison, which we linked to last week and it caused some… controversy discussion. In this article, Manuel explains why Liaison is different than similar RPC things that came before it. Interesting stuff, to say the least.

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PostgreSQL pg-structure.com

Extract the structure of a Postgres database into JavaScript

When your database is the source of truth, it’s often useful to inspect that truth and reuse it elsewhere in your application. import pgStructure from "pg-structure"; async function demo() { const db = await pgStructure({ database: "db", user: "u", password: "pass" }, { includeSchemas: ["public"] }); const table = db.get("contact"); const columnNames = table.columns.map(c => c.name); const columnTypeName = table.columns.get("options").type.name; const indexColumnNames = table.indexes.get("ix_mail").columns; const relatedTables = table.hasManyTables; }

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Manuel Vila liaison.dev

Do we really need a web API?

Most of the time, web APIs are not functional requirements. They don’t add any value to the product we are building. They are just a necessary evil so the frontend can communicate with the backend. But is that really the case? Wouldn’t it be possible to get rid of these web APIs? In response to this, Manuel built Liaison, which is still in alpha, but aims to seamlessly bridge the divide between frontend and backend without having to formalize an API between the two. From reading the post, it appears to be akin to our old friend, RPC. If you are interested enough to dive into the code, he’s put together a RealWorld example which holds up quite well to the competition on a lines-of-code-to-implement basis.

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HTML almanac.httparchive.org

The HTTP Archive's first annual *state of the web* report

Our mission is to combine the raw stats and trends of the HTTP Archive with the expertise of the web community. The Web Almanac is a comprehensive report on the state of the web, backed by real data and trusted web experts. It is comprised of 20 chapters spanning aspects of page content, user experience, publishing, and distribution. There’s so much to digest here. 85 contributors! Quite an achievement and one that I’m excited to dig in to.

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