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Go is a programming language built to resemble a simplified version of the C programming language.
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Go github.com

pgrok is a poor man's ngrok

A multi-tenant HTTP reverse tunnel solution through remote port forwarding from the SSH protocol.

This is intended for small teams that need to expose the local development environment to the public internet, and you need to bring your own domain name and SSO provider.

It gives stable subdomain for every user, and gated by your SSO through OIDC protocol.

Think this as a bare-bone alternative to the ngrok’s $65/user/month enterprise tier. Try to put this behind a production system will blow up your SLA.

For individuals and production systems, just buy ngrok, it is still my favorite.

Go Time Go Time #268

This will blow your docs off

In a world where most documentation sucks, large language models write better than humans, and people won’t be bothered to type full sentences with actual punctuation.

Two men… against all odds… join an award-worthy podcast… hosted by a coin-operated, singing code monkey (?)… to convince the developer world they’re doing it ALL wrong.

Grab your code-generator and heat up that cold cup of coffee on your desk. Because this episode of Go Time is about to blow your docs off!

Go serviceweaver.dev

Service Weaver is a programming framework for writing & deploying cloud apps

Service Weaver is a programming framework for writing, deploying, and managing distributed applications in Go. With Service Weaver, you write your application like it is a traditional, single-process Go executable that runs on your local machine. Then, you deploy it to the Cloud, and the framework breaks it down into a set of connected microservices and integrates it with the cloud provider (e.g., monitoring, tracing, logging).

Go benhoyt.com

From Go on EC2 to Fly.io: +fun, −$9/mo

Ben Hoyt shares his experience switching two of his side projects from on an EC2 instance to Fly.io:

It took me about an hour to figure out the basics of Fly.io and move the simpler project, and a couple of evenings to move the more complex one. Fly.io handles the annoying reverse proxy and SSL stuff, deployment is as simple as fly deploy, and there’s a nice dashboard on Fly.io to show me what’s going on…

I’m only a few weeks into using Fly.io to host my side projects, but I’m very happy with their product so far. I was quite happy to delete the 500 lines of Ansible scripts, systemd unit files, and Caddy config files.

It also made me smile to finally stop the EC2 instance and bump my AWS bill down from $9 per month to about 10 cents per month (I still use S3 for user-uploaded images and for backups). I have nothing against EC2 and would use it again for certain things, but for small web applications, Fly.io seems like a great fit.

Filippo Valsorda words.filippo.io

I’m now a full-time professional open source maintainer

Filippo Valsorda:

Last May I left my job on the Go team at Google to experiment with more sustainable paths for open-source maintainers. I held on to my various maintainer hats (Go cryptography, transparency tooling, age, mkcert, yubikey-agent…), iterated on the model since September, and I’m happy to report that I am now a full-time independent open-source maintainer.

People like Filippo are still (unfortunately) the exception, not the rule. BUT! I’ll celebrate every time an open source maintainer makes it to the promised land, hopefully paving the way for others to follow after.

I’m sharing details about my progress to hopefully popularize the model, and eventually help other maintainers adopt it, although I’m not quite ready to recommend anyone else drop everything to try this just yet.

Chris Coyier chriscoyier.net

A very basic aggregator site in Next.js with Go cloud functions and Supabase

I love a good “I built a thing and here is how I built that thing” post, especially when it’s penned by someone like Chris who’s sure to keep you entertained along the way.

Wouldn’t it be neat to have aggregated data (for a website, daily email, push alert, etc) of kids events in our surrounding area so we know about them right away?

— My wife, possibly salty we missed out on Bluey Live tickets in Portland

Terminal github.com

`hishtory` is a better shell history

It stores your shell history in context (what directory you ran the command in, whether it succeeded or failed, how long it took, etc). This is all stored locally and end-to-end encrypted for syncing to to all your other computers. All of this is easily queryable via the hishtory CLI. This means from your laptop, you can easily find that complex bash pipeline you wrote on your server, and see the context in which you ran it.

Russ Cox go.dev

Thirteen years of Go

Russ Cox, for the Go team:

Today we celebrate the thirteenth birthday of the Go open source release. The Gopher is a teenager!

It’s been an eventful year for Go. The most significant event was the release of Go 1.18 in March, which brought many improvements but most notably Go workspaces, fuzzing, and generics.

He goes on to describe many of the other notable features and events of the past year and closes with a glance into Go’s future:

In Go’s 14th year, we’ll keep working to make Go the best environment for software engineering at scale. We plan to focus particularly on supply chain security, improved compatibility, and structured logging, all of which have been linked already in this post. And there will be plenty of other improvements as well, including profile-guided optimization.

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