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Thorsten Ball thorstenball.com

Learn more programming languages, even if you won't use them

Thorsten Ball writes on his personal blog: Different programming languages are good at different things and bad at others. Each one makes certain things easier and in turn others harder. Depending on what we want to do we can save ourselves a lot of work by choosing the language that makes solving the type of problem we’re facing the easiest. That’s one of the tangible, no-nonsense benefits of learning more languages. You put another tool in your toolbox and when the time comes you’re able to choose the best one. But I would go even one step further. I think it’s valuable to learn new programming languages even if — here it comes — you never take them out of the box. But why? Languages shape the way we think, each in their own peculiar way. That’s true for programming languages as well…

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Hamel Husain towardsdatascience.com

How to automate tasks on GitHub with machine learning for fun and profit

This is an explainer on how to build a GitHub App that predicts and applies issue labels using Tensorflow and public datasets. Hamel Husain writes: In order to show you how to create your own apps, we will walk you through the process of creating a GitHub app that can automatically label issues. Note that all of the code for this app, including the model training steps are located in this GitHub repository. See also: Issue Label Bot

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Quantum computing quantum.country

Quantum computing for the very curious

A fabulous introduction to Quantum computing: Learning this material is challenging. Quantum computing and quantum mechanics are famously “hard” subjects, often presented as mysterious and forbidding. If this were a conventional essay, chances are that you’d rapidly forget the material. But the essay is also an experiment in the essay form… the essay incorporates new user interface ideas to help you remember what you read. Parts 2 and 3 coming soon. ⌛

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Dhawal Shah freeCodeCamp

570 free online programming & computer science courses

Get your free learning on! Dhawal Shah, founder of Class Central , writes for freeCodeCamp: Seven years ago, universities like MIT and Stanford first opened up free online courses to the public. Today, more than 850 schools around the world have created thousands of free online courses, popularly known as Massive Open Online Courses or MOOCs. I’ve compiled this list of 550 such free online courses that you can start in March. For this, I leveraged Class Central’s database of over 11,000 online courses. I’ve also included each course’s average rating.

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Nathan Pitzer find.xyz

Product-building articles by PMs at major tech companies

This is a treasure trove of product development articles by product managers at major tech companies. 1000+ articles recommended/written by PMs at Google, Facebook and almost every other major tech company or startup. This list contains no videos, books, or product placements — just articles. Read all of these articles to get your doctorate in Product Management.

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Dave Cheney dave.cheney.net

Practical Go — Real world advice for writing maintainable Go programs

This is Dave Cheney’s working document for his Practical Go workshop. So much wisdom shared. My goal over the next two sessions is to give you my advice for best practices writing Go code. This is a workshop style presentation, I’m going to dispense with the usual slide deck and we’ll work directly from the document which you can take away with you today. There’s also this page of the same name on his site, but I’m not sure if they’re directly connected.

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 Itamar Turner-Trauring codewithoutrules.com

On learning new technologies: why breadth beats depth

There’s always new technologies coming out, and learning them in-depth would take an impossible amount of time. But you can most of the benefit, and more efficiently, by focusing on learning just enough about a broad range of tools to know when they’re useful. You know I’ve been preaching breadth-first over depth-first for years now. In this post, Itamar breaks down why that’s a smart strategy for learning new technologies and lays out a few ways you can gain breadth of knowledge. Unfortunately, he omitted one of the best ways of gaining (and maintaining) breadth: listen to podcasts!

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Matt Dole artsy.github.io

So you want to be a software engineer

Are you or someone you know trying to move into the engineering department from a position that’s unrelated to software engineering at a company? …I wanted to pursue computer engineering. I’d been at Artsy for a bit less than two years at that point, first as a marketing intern working on SEO and then as a coordinator on the CRM (read: email) team. I’d consistently been working on small technical projects; first doing some work on a tool for SEO optimization for our Editorial team, then building emails with MJML, and a few other bits and bobs. But I didn’t think of it as a serious pursuit. It was Artsy’s Engineering team that convinced me that programming was something that I both wanted to and could do. Our engineers have always welcomed learners and been happy to answer questions and empower other teams to do technical work. I eventually realized that the parts of my work where I was coding were the parts I enjoyed the most, and that I would likely feel more fulfilled if I made programming my full-time occupation. (Gosh, that opening sounds like the first line of a pharmaceutical commercial. Sorry about that!)

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Lara Hogan twitter.com

Lara Hogan on mentorship and sponsorship

Read this Twitter thread from Lara Hogan. Get wisdom. Here’s an excerpt from the thread: I’m giving a talk today about Mentorship and Sponsorship and how they help folks grow in super different ways. Managers most frequently default to mentorship mode when they’re helping their teammates grow, and that’s… not quite right, exactly But the magical mode is SPONSOR MODE. Also, read “What does sponsorship look like?”

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Dan Abramov overreacted.io

React as a UI runtime

At a 37 minute read time, this post from Dan Abramov on using React as a programming runtime is near book length and will give you a deeper understanding of React “than 90% of its users.” We’ve touched on pretty much all important aspects of the React runtime environment. If you finished this page, you probably know React in more detail than 90% of its users. And there’s nothing wrong with that!

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Mattt Thompson nshipster.com

Flight School - essential topics in iOS and macOS development

Today, I’m excited to announce updates to our guides to Swift Codable and Numbers, as well as a brand new Guide to Swift Strings. Everything is up-to-date with the latest from Swift 5 and Xcode 10.2, and now — for the first time — available in print! If you dig NSHipster, you’ll love Flight School. Amazing cover design! I love it when the cover of a book makes you want to read it.

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Denny Tek dennytek.com

Building a personal site with Gatsby (part 1)

The goal of this series of blog posts is to create a personal website using Gatsby V2 from the default starter. The final website will have an index page where you can introduce yourself, a list of all blog posts, individual blog pages, tag pages listing blog posts in specific categories, and a projects portfolio page. Here’s all the parts to this deep dive. Part 1: Introduction and Setup Part 2: Styling with Sass/SCSS Part 3: Generating Blog Posts with Markdown Files Part 4: Creating a List of Blog Posts Part 5: Adding Thumbnail Images to a Blog List Part 6: Adding Multiple Responsive Images to a Markdown Blog Post Part 7: Adding Tags to Blog Posts Part 8: Creating a Project Page from JSON data Part 9: Pagination, Deploying to Netlify, and SEO Check out the example repo on GitHub and preview the final website.

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Practical AI Practical AI #28

New year’s resolution: dive into deep learning!

Fully Connected – a series where Chris and Daniel keep you up to date with everything that’s happening in the AI community. If you’re anything like us, your New Year’s resolutions probably included an AI section, so this week we explore some of the learning resources available for artificial intelligence and deep learning. Where you go with it depends upon what you want to achieve, so we discuss academic versus industry career paths, and try to set you on the Practical AI path that will help you level up.

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Y Combinator Icon Y Combinator

Now you can listen to Startup Playbook by Sam Altman (for free)

The book is free in Kindle format on Amazon AND you can listen for free on the web! We spend a lot of time advising startups. Though one-on-one advice will always be crucial, we thought it might help us scale Y Combinator if we could distill the most generalizable parts of this advice into a sort of playbook we could give YC and YC Fellowship companies. Then we thought we should just give it to everyone. This is meant for people new to the world of startups. Most of this will not be new to people who have read a lot of what YC partners have written—the goal is to get it into one place.

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Max Stoiber mxstbr.com

Regrets and lessons learned building Spectrum

Max Stoiber shares his regrets and lessons learned from tech choices made when building Spectrum. Yes, this is the same Spectrum recently acquired by GitHub. With the benefit of hindsight, here are the technology choices I regret and the lessons I have learned. … Changing these decisions would not have made Spectrum a better product by itself. Yet, it would have saved us time and allowed us to spend more time experimenting.

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