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Sean DuBois webrtcforthecurious.com

WebRTC for the Curious 📘

A new CC0 book about WebRTC by Sean DuBois (and friends). Sean recently shared his love for and deep knowledge about the technology on our Go Time podcast.

This book was created by WebRTC implementers to share their hard-earned knowledge with the world. WebRTC for the curious is an Open Source book written for those that are always looking for more. This book doesn’t settle for abstraction.

This book is all about protocols and APIs, and will not be talking about any software in particular. We attempt to summarize RFCs and get all undocumented knowledge into one place. This is book is not a tutorial, and will not contain much code.

This is very much a WIP, but there’s a fair bit ready for consumption and the authors are actively collaborating in the GitHub repo.

Shubheksha Jalan shubheksha.com

How to start reviewing code

Code review is critical to being a software engineer yet there aren’t many resources on how to build up the skill. That’s why Shubheksha wrote what she learned when she first started making the mental shift from writing code to reviewing it.

Remember to be kind and empathetic — Code reviews are very ripe for misunderstanding and lack of empathy on either side. At the heart of code reviews is collaboration. It is as important to remind yourself as a reviewer that you’re reviewing someone’s code and not passing judgments on them as a person and it is equally important to remember that whatever your reviewer tells you is not meant as a personal attack.

Music helen.blog

What software teams can learn from music masterclasses

Musicians and developers go together like peas and carrots, Jenny. So it makes sense that techniques used by musicians to hone their skills might transfer over to software people. One of those techniques is the “masterclass”

A masterclass is a format in which musicians perform a work for an established artist and the artist then gives them feedback rather like a lesson, except that all of this happens in front of an audience.

Click through for a compelling distillation of what software teams can learn from musicians when it comes to giving and receiving feedback.

Stephanie Morillo stephaniemorillo.co

A Brief introduction to technical writing

Stephanie Morillo:

Developers encounter technical writing everywhere: product & API docs, manpages, tutorials & more. We know it matters but what is technical writing exactly? And how does it differ from other writing?

In this brief post, I define what technical writing is, provide examples of technical writing in software and beyond, and explore other skills technical writers must develop to create successful and effective documentation.

Nikola Đuza pragmaticpineapple.com

Why learn Vim in 2020?

Nikola Đuza makes a compelling case for the powerful text editor that developers love (or love to hate):

What Vim is excellent at is navigating, making some changes, and repeating the process. The process most call editing (not to be confused with writing). Most developers tend to overlook this fact, but this is one of the strong selling points of Vim. Developers are more prone to reading code, jumping from file to file, making small incisions in the code, and writing code all the time.

Jordan Lewis jordanlewis.org

How to run a live coding stream (on Twitch using OBS)

Jordan Lewis shared his end-to-end setup to run a live coding stream. He covers all the things — OBS configuration, stream alerts, channel setup, chatbot, becoming a Twitch affiliate…

If you’re reading this post, you might be interested in trying your hand at live coding on stream, as a way of sharing your projects in a more relatable, immediate way than a polished blog post, teaching others about programming, or just as a way to have fun. I think that live coding and streams in general are an interesting possible future form of both education and entertainment, and if you’re contemplating starting your own stream, I sincerely hope that you do it.

How to run a live coding stream (on Twitch using OBS)

Vlad Mihalcea Twitter

You can write a software book and make over $100k

Here’s what worked for Vlad Mihalcea…

  1. I started a blog first. This allows you to practice your writing and build an audience.

  2. I self-published my book because publishers only wanted to give me just 10% from the profit. I used Leanpub to write and sell the book while I was still writing it and Teachable to sell it when it was done. Leanpub gives you 80% royalties. Teachable gives you around 95%.

Check his Twitter thread for the other twelve (12) things he did to make money with his book idea.

Sheshbabu Chinnakonda sheshbabu.com

Rust for JavaScript developers (functions and control flow)

This is part 3 of a three part series from Sheshbabu Chinnakonda introducing the Rust language to JavaScript developers — this one is focused on functions and control flow.

When Shesh kicked off this series he said, “I find it easier to understand something new if it was explained in terms of something I already know. I thought there might be others like me.”

BTW, here are links to the others from this series:

Learn commoncog.com

How to use YouTube to learn tacit knowledge

This article isn’t about software development, per se, though there is a section on learning programming. Instead, it’s about YouTube itself and how it’s become an amazing platform for knowledge transfer.

In this piece, we’re going to walk through a number of ways you may use YouTube for tacit knowledge acquisition, on a domain-by-domain basis. I’m afraid the anecdotes here are necessarily domain-specific, but the purpose of this piece is to give you certain patterns that you may adapt to whatever skillset you want to acquire in whatever domain you’re interested in.

It’s a shame that a thing as valuable to humanity as YouTube is owned by a single corporate entity. This makes me appreciate Wikipedia even more…

Nabeel Qureshi nabeelqu.co

Video games are the future of education

Nabeel shares some great insights about using games/simulations for learning in this post — I recommend reading it if the topic piques your interest (always be learning, amirite?).

Learning is just the act of engaging with an external thing and performing many conjecture/criticism loops, forming conclusions, and building on them to form a body of knowledge.

So it makes sense that video games would be the primary educational environment of the future: they are the best way we have of (a) creating simulations of reality (b) with fast feedback loops (c) accessible at low cost.

Video games are the future of education

Victor Zhou victorzhou.com

An interactive guide to XSS attacks

Definitely Secure Bank® returns, this time with a big Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability:

To get in character, let’s have you open up your online banking portal and look around. Click here to open Definitely Secure Bank’s website and login. Use any username and any password you want (don’t worry - it’s definitely secure). Keep that tab open for the rest of this post.

Victor is killing it with this Web Security 101 series.

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